SATELLITE TEAM


You can find here, the complete team of RadioSatellite and RadioSatellite2

 

For RadioSatellite : Instrumental music / Lounge / Jazz :

Guido  : Presenting his program : In the Zone (Lounge) (Netherlands)

Michael Maretimo : Presenting his program : Maretimo Sessions (Lounge) (Nethelands)

Steve Hart : Presenting his program : Cool Nights ( Soft Jazz)  (New Zealand)

 

For RadioSatellite2 : Oldies Pop from 60s to 80s + Soft Jazz + Blues + Country Music

Artie Martello : Presenting his daily program : Mostly Folk ( Folk, Pop and Americana) (USA)

Steve Hart : Presenting his daily  program : Cool Nights  ( Soft Jazz) (New Zealand)

Rojene Bailey : Presenting his “week end” program : Blues Time In the City ( Blues) (USA)

Paul Farrar : Presenting his program : Paul Farrar Comedy Show  (Comedy)(UK)

Jason Curtman : Presenting his daily program : The Jason Curtman Show  (American Oldies RocknRoll and pop ) (USA)

Ben Morris : Presenting his program : Rockin Back the clock (UK)

Matthew LasarPaul Riismandel, and Jennifer Waits : Presenting their program: Radio Survivor (Reports / news and interviews about radios and webradios) (USA)

 

CLICK ON VIDEO BELOW TO DISCOVER SHOWS ON RADIOSATELLITE & RADIOSATELLITE2

 

 

Music composition + Audio and Video creation : by Pierre .

 

BELLA CIAO


Bella ciao” is an Italian folk song, and later an anti-fascist resistance song. It was used by the Italian partisans during the Italian Civil War between 1943 and 1945 in their struggle against the fascist Italian Social Republic and its Nazi German allies.

It is used worldwide as an anti-fascist hymn of freedom and resistance. The song has much older origins though in the hardships of the mondina women, the paddy field workers in the late 19th century who sang it as a protest against harsh working conditions in the paddy fields in North Italy.

“Bella ciao” was originally sung as “Alla mattina appena alzata” by seasonal worker of paddy fields of rice, especially in Italy’s Po Valley from the late 19th century to the first half of the 20th century with different lyrics.

The work of monda (weeding) was widespread in northern Italy in that era. The work consisted of removing the weeds growing in rice fields that hindered the healthy growth of young rice plants. It took place during the flooding of the fields, from the end of April to the beginning of June every year, during which the delicate shoots needed to be protected, during their first stages of their development, from temperature differences between the day and the night.

bella ciao Rodge Ft Tre Tenori (Album 2018 )

bella ciao Rodge Ft Tre Tenori (Album 2018 )

It consisted of two phases: transplanting the plants and pruning the weeds. The work of monda was an extremely tiring task, carried out mostly by women known as mondinas (rice-weeders) that came of the poorest social classes. The workers would spend their workdays with their bare feet in water up to their knees and their back bent for many hours. The atrocious working conditions, long hours and very low pay led to constant dissatisfaction and led, at times to rebellious movements and riots in the early years of the twentieth century.

The struggles against the supervising padroni was even harder with the abundance of clandestine workers ready to compromise even further the already low wages just to get work. Besides “Bella ciao”, similar songs by the mondina women included “Sciur padrun da li beli braghi bianchi” and “Se otto ore vi sembran poche”.

Other similar versions of the antecedents of “Bella ciao” appeared over the years, indicating that “Alla mattina appena alzata” must have been composed in the later half of the 19th century. The earliest written version is dated 1906 and comes from near Vercelli, Piedmont.

 

“Bella ciao” was revived by the anti-fascist resistance movement active in Italy between 1943 and 1945 with different lyrics of resistance. The author of the lyrics is unknown.

In addition to the original Italian, the song has been recorded by various artists in many different languages, including #Arabic, #Bosnian, #Breton, #Catalan, #Chinese (known as “啊朋友再见“), #Croatian, #Danish, #English, #Esperanto, #Finnish, #German, #Hungarian, #Japanese, #Persian, #Norwegian, #Occitan, #Russian, #Serbian, #Slovenian, #Spanish, #Syriac, #Tagalog, #Telugu, #Thai, #Tibetan, and #Ukrainian.

 

A rewritten version of the song can be heard on Chumbawamba’s acoustic album A Singsong and a Scrap.

Former Yugoslav punk rock bands KUD Idijoti and later Goblini recorded their versions of the track.

Hungarian punk rock band Aurora has performed the song.

Folk musician Leslie Fish has written and performed several versions of the song, one of which can be found on the album Smoked Fish.

Folk artist Mirah lent her voice to this song on her 2004 album, To All We Stretch the Open Arm.

Anita Lane recorded a version in English for her 2001 album, Sex O’Clock.

Breton folk punk band Les Ramoneurs de menhirs recorded a version in Breton and French but called it “BellARB”.

Danish psychedelic rock group Savage Rose have recorded a version of this song on the albums En Vugge Af Stål from 1982 and Ild Og Frihed (1989).

San Francisco punk band La Plebe perform “Bella Ciao” on their album, Brazo en Brazo.

French-born musician of Spanish origin Manu Chao has also recorded a version of the song.

The tune has been used in a song in the Indian Tollywood movie Businessman, starring Mahesh Babu, Music by S.S.Thaman.

Italian ska punk band Talco recorded the song on their 2006 album Combat Circus.

Konstantin Wecker and Hannes Wader, two German “Liedermacher” performed it live on their collaboration album Was für eine Nacht.

Yugoslav musician Goran Bregovic has recorded one version on his album Champagne for Gypsies (2012).

German folk duo Zupfgeigenhansel recorded a free adaptation on their 1982 album Miteinander that, instead of glorifying the death of the partisan, paints him as a reluctant anti-hero who is scared and despises war, but feels he has no other choice because of the atrocities he has seen.

Thai anti-fascism band, “Faiyen” (ไฟเย็น, “Cold Flame”) recorded a Thai version of the song called “Plodploy Plianplaeng” (Thai: ปลดปล่อย เปลี่ยนแปลง, “Liberate and Change”). It has been used by the Red Shirts anti-fascism group since 2011.

Spanish punk rock band boikot recorded a modified version in Spanish.

An a cappela version was recorded by the Swingle Singers in 1991 on their album “Folk Music Around The World”

Belarusian folk punk band Dzieciuki recorded a modified version in Belarusian under the name “Трымайся, браце!” (“Hold fast, brother”)

Syriac (Aramaic) version created by Beith Souryoye Morounoye under the name “foosh bashlom (Bella ciao)”

Patric recorded Bèla Ciaò, a version in Occitan for his 2010 album, Colors.

Mike Singer recorded an Electro dance version in June 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source Wikipedia / Youtube

Worldcup 2018 : France


No words, no comments. We can’t express the happiness and the joy of France.

All People, all communities, all french people from wherever they are.

A real share of happiness

 

President Of France : Emmanuel Macron

 

Macron

 

Paris

 

PARIS2

 

Paris3

 

Paris4

 

LA MAISON BLEUE


CHILDREN’S DAYCARE / NURSERY

If you are in France or you work in France ( ALL DEPARTMENTS AND ALL CITIES in FRANCE) : More than 1 300 addresses.

So  if you want to keep  your young children (under 4 years old)  well guarded, and to let them spend educational  days? … Here is an address , a website  to remember. ( you can use Google translator …Just in case )

 

Details :

https://www.la-maison-bleue.fr/

LOGO

https://www.facebook.com/crecheslamaisonbleue/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCqEyRc5UtV1tHflNi9wpDw

https://www.linkedin.com/company/la-maison-bleue/

Smartspeakers


 

Smart speaker assistants compared: Siri vs. Alexa vs. Google Assistant

 

CLICK HERE TO READ ARTICLE

 

 

 

Article by  AppleInsider Staff

https://appleinsider.com

 

Smartspeakers

DAMIAN MULLER NEW ALBUM


Damian Muller’s ORIGINAL & refreshing songs will make you laugh, sometimes cry, and always smile. “YOU’VE STILL GOT IT” is his second CD of his own songs that will touch your heart with his real-life, uplifting, humorous, and poignant stories. The CD features an ALL-STAR CAST of incredible musicians: Jim Van Cleve, Aaron Ramsey, Seth Taylor, Russ Carson, and tight blend of smooth family harmonies.

Damian is a long-time Richmond, VA songwriter and performer.

In addition to being an award-winning bluegrass bassist, Damian is currently the principal bassist for The Richmond Philharmonic Orchestra.

About “YOU’VE STILL GOT IT”
Produced by Jim Van Cleve & Damian Muller
Recorded by David Hall at Studio Studio, Franklin, TN

1. THERE’S NO FUTURE LIVING IN THE PAST – Hard Driving Bluegrass – about meeting someone from your past. It may take you back to that time in your life, but you can’t spend your life looking back.

2. HALF AND INCH OF SNOW – Hilarious yet true story whenever it snows anywhere in the south. Upbeat acoustic swing style.

3. THE BEAUTY OF AMERICA – A poignant patriotic ballad for our time – Inspired by the many good things in this country that make us proud to be Americans.

4. YOU’VE STILL GOT IT – a Bouncy Bluegrass Song – Everyone who’s been in a relationship a long time wants to hear that they’ve still got it.

5. GALAX STATE OF MIND – Upbeat Bluegrass – There’s nothing quite like spending a week at the fiddlers convention in Galax, Virginia playing music night and day.

6. CLAP YOUR HANDS – Bluegrass Gospel – Everyone and every church has many reasons to celebrate!

7. ON MY WAY – a touching true story about someone who lived his faith every day of his life.

8. THINGS ARE LOOKING UP – Hard Driving & Lighthearted Bluegrass – This is for anyone who found their true love the second time around.

9. NEVER TOO OLD – Acoustic ballad any baby boomer or senior can relate to. It’s never too old to find love & happiness.

10. SHENANDOAH HOME – Upbeat Bluegrass – Going to Shenandoah National Park always feels like going home. However, for folks whose families lived there before it was a park, going home takes on a different meaning.

11. BE NOT AFRAID – a wonderful Bluegrass Gospel Quartet inspired by the scriptures.

12. LOVE LIVES FOREVER – a touching Bluegrass Ballad about remembering our grandparents’ love – and wanting to pass that love on to our own grandchildren.

13. LONG WAY TO GO – an exciting, upbeat Gospel Bluegrass Quartet with terrific harmonies & a great message.

 

From his last Album, we can listen to Steady Work

 

Damian Muller cover album 2018

TOP 100


TOP 100 of countries / Listeners  for MARCH 2018

Listeners by country and by connection for RADIO SATELLITE

Reminder: Radio Satellite plays “instrumental” music (#JamesLast, #FaustoPapetti, #EnnioMorricone, #Zamfir….)

Radio Satellite2 : Plays Oldies Pop Rock music and also Some soft jazz programs and blues.  (#Eric_Clapton, #Elton_john, #JohnDenver, #Abba, #BeeGees, #TheCarpenters, #TheEverlyBrothers, #The_Statler_Brothers, #Beatles, #BarryWhite, #TomJones and more…)

TOP20

 

TOP40

 

TOP60

 

TOP 80

 

 

 

TOP100

 

 

 

 

 

Just for Fun


Just for Fun with “Radio Satellite” and “Radio Satellite2”

We won’t write…

We won’t talk…

We will just watch this funny video ….

Have  a great day folks

 

 

RS2 PP 700 X 400

Mission Impossible…60s and 70s


 

Mission: Impossible is an American television series, created and initially produced by Bruce Geller, chronicling the exploits of a team of secret government agents known as the Impossible Missions Force (IMF).

Mission impossible3

 

In the first season the team is led by Dan Briggs, played by Steven Hill; Jim Phelps, played by Peter Graves, takes charge for the remaining seasons. A hallmark of the series is each episode’s opening scene, in which Briggs or Phelps receives his instructions from a faceless voice, delivered on a recording which then self-destructs; this is immediately followed by the series’ innovative theme music composed by Lalo Schifrin.

 

 

The series was filmed and financed by Desilu Productions, and aired on the CBS network from September 1966 to March 1973. It was revived in 1988 for two seasons on ABC, retaining only Graves in the cast. It also inspired a series of theatrical motion pictures starring Tom Cruise, beginning in 1996.

The series follows the exploits of the Impossible Missions Force (IMF), a small team of secret agents used for covert missions against dictators, evil organizations and (primarily in later episodes) crime lords. On occasion, the IMF also mounts unsanctioned, private missions on behalf of its members.

The identities of the higher echelons of the organization that oversees the IMF are never revealed. Only rare cryptic bits of information are ever provided during the life of the series, such as in the third season mission “Nicole”, where the IMF leader states that his instructions come from “Division Seven”.

 

In the 1980s revival, it is suggested the IMF is an independent agency of the United States government. This is implied by the fact that towards the end of the taped instructed messages, the narrator includes the passage:- “As always, should you or any of your IM force be caught or killed, the Secretary will disavow any knowledge of your actions”, or words to that effect.

The leader of the IMF is initially Dan Briggs, played by Steven Hill. As an Orthodox Jew, Hill had to leave on Fridays at 4 p.m. to be home before sundown and was not available until after dark the next day.

Although his contract allowed for filming interruptions due to religious observances, the clause proved difficult to work around due to the production schedule and as the season progressed, an increasing number of episodes featured little of Briggs.

Hill had other problems as well.

After cooperatively crawling through dirt tunnels and repeatedly climbing a rope ladder in the episode “Snowball in Hell,” in the following episode ,  he balked at climbing a stairway with railings and locked himself in his dressing room.

Unable to come to terms with Hill, the producers re-shot the episode without him (another character, Cinnamon Carter, listened to the taped message, the selected operatives’ photos were displayed in “limbo”, and the team meeting was held in Rollin Hand’s apartment), and reduced Briggs’ presence in the five episodes left to be filmed to a minimum.

 

As far as Hill’s religious requirements were concerned, line producer Joseph Gantman simply had not understood what had been agreed to. He told author Patrick J. White, “‘If someone understands your problems and says he understands them, you feel better about it.

But if he doesn’t care about your problems, then you begin to really resent him. Steven Hill may have felt exactly the same way.”

Hill was replaced without explanation to the audience after the first season by Peter Graves playing the role of Jim Phelps, who remained the leader for the remainder of the original series and in the 1988–1990 revival.

In theory, Briggs and Phelps are the only full-time members of the IMF. As the series was originally conceived, they would form teams made up of part-time agents who came from a variety of professions, choosing their operatives based on the particular skills necessary for the mission.

In practice, however (especially after the first season), Briggs and especially Phelps would choose the same core group of three or four agents for every single mission, leading these regulars to be considered de facto full-time IMF agents. Still, many episodes also feature guest stars playing one-time additional agents who have special skills.

The regular agent line-up during the first season consisted of:

Cinnamon Carter (Barbara Bain), a top fashion model and actress

Barnard “Barney” Collier (Greg Morris), a mechanical and electronics genius and owner of Collier Electronics

William “Willy” Armitage (Peter Lupus), a world record-holding weight lifter

Rollin Hand (Martin Landau), a noted actor, makeup artist, escape artist, magician and “man of a million faces.”

 

Landau was billed as a “special guest star” during the first season; he had been cast as a guest star for the pilot with the understanding that he would be one of four or five rotating guest star agents. His contract gave producers an option to have him “render services for (three or four) additional episodes”.

To fill the void left by Hill’s Sabbath absences, producers wound up using Landau for more episodes, always as a “guest star”.

He eventually struck a deal to appear in all the first season’s remaining episodes, but always billed as a “guest star” so that he could have the option to give notice to work on a feature film. Landau contractually became a series regular in season two.

As actors left the series over time, others became regulars. Replacements often possessed the same skills as their predecessors.

For example, “The Great Paris” (Leonard Nimoy), Hand’s replacement in the fourth and fifth seasons, is also an actor, makeup artist, magician and “master of disguise.

” Also seen in seasons five and six is Dr. Doug Robert, played by Sam Elliott (according to White, the character was introduced as a replacement for Willy, but the idea was dropped once the producers realized how popular Willy was with viewers).

Cinnamon’s “replacement” in season four was a series of guest stars, only one making more than one appearance: Lee Meriwether as Tracey.

 

Season five saw the addition of Dana Lambert, played by stage and movie actress Lesley Ann Warren (billed as “Lesley Warren”). In seasons six and seven, the female member of the team was cosmetologist and mistress-of-disguise Lisa Casey (Lynda Day George), whose first name was only established in the 1988–1989 revival.

She was replaced in a third of the total season seven episodes, during her maternity leave, by Mimi Davis, played by Barbara Anderson, who had just come from the show Ironside.

Morris and Lupus were the only actors to last through the full run of the original series. Morris also appeared in two episodes of the revival series, in which the character’s son, Grant Collier (played by Morris’s real-life son, Phil Morris), is also an IMF agent.

The original series was filmed almost exclusively around Hollywood and the Los Angeles Basin. The pilot episode was filmed at Mount St. Mary’s College (Brentwood Campus) with special guest star Wally Cox.

Other first season locations included the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County (“Old Man Out”) and the Los Angeles Union Pacific rail yard (“The Train”).

Pasadena and the Caltech campus were common locations.[citation needed] Another noted location was the Bradbury Building, used in other films and series (from The Outer Limits to Blade Runner). One episode (“Trial by Fury”) was filmed at the Stalag 13 set of Hogan’s Heroes.

 

 

Casting :

Steven Hill

Barbara Bain

Greg Morris

Peter Lupus  

Peter Graves  

Martin Landau

Leonard Nimoy   (also Mr Spock in Star Trek)

Lesley Ann Warren 

Sam Elliott

Lynda Day George 

Barbara Anderson   (Played Also in Ironside )

 

Sources : Divers / Youtube / Pinterest / Wikipedia / Google / Zimbio

 

SIR CLIFF RICHARD ( Harry Rodger Webb )


RADIO SATELLITE

CLIFF RICHARDS : THE artist

He started life as Harry Webb and spent some of his childhood years in India. Cliff Richard was inspired by the music of Elvis Presley and at age 16, formed a band, ‘The Quintones’, with school friends and performed at their local Youth Club. From there, Cliff Richard went from strength to strength and became a global star.Image

Image

Having moved to India to help build a system of railways, Rodger Webb married Dorothy Dazely in 1939 and the following year the couple had a baby boy – Harry Rodger Webb.

Born in The King’s English Hospital in Lucknow, Harry was educated in Howrah, until his family moved to England in 1948, following Home Rule in India.

After a privileged life in India, the Webbs faced poverty, and were forced to sleep on mattresses at the houses of various relatives. In 1951, they were given a…

View original post 668 more words

They were… They are


They are stars

We know them as we saw them in the movies.

But time has passed and everyone is changing.

Here how we knew them
Here they are now mature and greater than before

 

ABBA

ABBA

ABBA

 

 

ART GARFUNKEL (Simon and Garfunkel 

ART AND GARFUNKEL

ART AND GARFUNKEL

 

 

BARBARA EDEN 

Barbara Eden

Barbara Eden

 

 

BARRY GIBB  (Bee Gees )

barry gibb bee gees

barry gibb bee gees

 

 

BOB DYLAN

Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan

 

 

CAT STEVENS

cat stevens

cat stevens

 

 

DAVID MC CALLUM

David Mc Callum

David Mc Callum

 

 

HARISON FORD

Harison Ford

Harison Ford

 

 

JOAN BAEZ

Joan baez

Joan baez

 

 

JULIE ANDREWS

JULIE ANDREWS

JULIE ANDREWS

 

SOUND OF MUSIC TEAM  ( Von Trapp family in movie)

Sound of music team

Sound of music team

 

 

PAUL ANKA

PAUL ANKA

PAUL ANKA

 

 

LEE  AAKER ( Aka RUSTY in RINTINTIN )

LEE AAKER AKA RUSTY in RINTINTIN

LEE AAKER AKA RUSTY in RINTINTIN

 

 

TOM HANKS

Tom Hanks

Tom Hanks

 

 

TOM JONES

TOM JONES

TOM JONES

 

Sources : Google

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pat Boone


Charles Eugene “Pat” Boone (born June 1, 1934) is an American singer, composer, actor, writer, television personality, motivational speaker, and spokesman. He was a successful pop singer in the United States during the 1950s and early 1960s.

 

pat Boone

pat Boone

He sold more than 45 million records, had 38 top-40 hits, and appeared in more than 12 Hollywood films.

According to Billboard, Boone was the second-biggest charting artist of the late 1950s, behind only Elvis Presley, and was ranked at No. 9 in its listing of the Top 100 Top 40 Artists 1955–1995.

Until the 2010s, Boone held the Billboard record for spending 220 consecutive weeks on the charts with one or more songs each week.

 

At the age of 23, he began hosting a half-hour ABC variety television series, The Pat Boone Chevy Showroom, which aired for 115 episodes (1957–1960). Many musical performers, including Edie Adams, Andy Williams, Pearl Bailey, and Johnny Mathis, made appearances on the show. His cover versions of rhythm and blues hits had a noticeable effect on the development of the broad popularity of rock and roll. Elvis Presley was the opening act for a 1955 Pat Boone show in Cleveland, Ohio.

 

As an author, Boone had a number-one bestseller in the 1950s (Twixt Twelve and Twenty, Prentice-Hall). In the 1960s, he focused on gospel music and is a member of the Gospel Music Hall of Fame. He continues to perform and speak as a motivational speaker, a television personality, and a conservative political commentator.

Boone was born Charles Eugene Boone on June 1, 1934, in Jacksonville, Florida, the son of Margaret Virginia (Pritchard) and Archie Altman Boone. Boone was reared primarily in Nashville, Tennessee, a place he still visits. His family moved to Nashville from Florida when Boone was two years old. He attended and graduated in 1952 from David Lipscomb High School in Nashville. His younger brother, whose professional name is Nick Todd, was also a pop singer in the 1950s and is now a church music leader.

pat Pat Boone

Pat Boone

In a 2007 interview on The 700 Club, Boone claimed that he is the great-great-great-great grandson of the American pioneer Daniel Boone.

He is a cousin of two stars of Western television series: Richard Boone of CBS’s Have Gun – Will Travel and Randy Boone, of NBC’s The Virginian and CBS’s Cimarron Strip.[citation needed] Research done a few years ago  by The Boone Society found that Pat and his siblings are not biological descendants of Daniel Boone, nor of any of Daniel’s brothers.

Pat’s siblings were notified and have acknowledged that the research done by The Boone Society is true.

 

In November 1953, when he was 19 years old, Boone married Shirley Lee Foley, daughter of country music great Red Foley and his wife, singer Judy Martin. They have four daughters: Cheryl Lynn (better known as Cherry), Linda Lee, Deborah Ann (better known as Debby), and Laura Gene. Starting in the late 1950s, Boone and his family were residents of Leonia, New Jersey.

In college, he primarily attended David Lipscomb College, later Lipscomb University, in Nashville. He graduated in 1958 from Columbia University School of General Studies magna cum laude[7] and also attended North Texas State University, now known as the University of North Texas, in Denton, Texas.

Boone began his career by performing in Nashville’s Centennial Park

He began recording in 1954 for Republic Records (not to be confused with the current label with that name), and by 1955, for Dot Records.

His 1955 version of Fats Domino’s “Ain’t That a Shame” was a hit. This set the stage for the early part of Boone’s career, which focused on covering R&B songs by black artists for a white American market.

Randy Wood, the owner of Dot, had issued an R&B single by the Griffin Brothers in 1951 called “Tra La La-a”—a different song from the later LaVern Baker one—and he was keen to put out another version after the original had failed. This became the B side of the first Boone single “Two Hearts Two Kisses”, originally by the Charms – whose “Hearts Of Stone” had been covered by the label’s Fontane Sisters.

Once the Boone version was in the shops, it spawned more covers by the Crew-Cuts, Doris Day, and Frank Sinatra.

A number-one single in 1956 by Boone was a second cover and a revival of a then seven-year-old song “I Almost Lost My Mind”, by Ivory Joe Hunter, which was originally covered by another black star, Nat King Cole.

 

According to an opinion poll of high-school students in 1957, the singer was nearly the “two-to-one favorite over Elvis Presley among boys and preferred almost three-to-one by girls …”

During the late 1950s, he made regular appearances on ABC-TV’s Ozark Jubilee, hosted by his father-in-law.

Pat Boone

Pat Boone

Boone cultivated a safe, wholesome, advertiser-friendly image that won him a long-term product endorsement contract from General Motors during the late 1950s, lasting through the 1960s.

He succeeded Dinah Shore singing the praises of the GM product: “See the USA in your Chevrolet … drive your Chevrolet through the USA, America’s the greatest land of all!” GM had also sponsored The Pat Boone Chevy Showroom.

In the 1989 documentary Roger & Me, Boone stated that he first was given a Chevrolet Corvette from the GM product line, but after his wife and he started having children, at one child a year, GM supplied him with a station wagon, as well.

 

Many of Boone’s hit singles were covers of hits from black R&B artists. These included: “Ain’t That a Shame” by Fats Domino; “Tutti Frutti” and “Long Tall Sally” by Little Richard;

“At My Front Door (Crazy Little Mama)” by The El Dorados; and the blues ballads “I Almost Lost My Mind” by Ivory Joe Hunter, “I’ll be Home” by the Flamingos and “Don’t Forbid Me” by Charles Singleton. Boone also wrote the lyrics for the instrumental theme song for the movie Exodus, which he titled “This Land Is Mine”. (Ernest Gold had composed the music.)

As a conservative Christian, Boone declined certain songs and movie roles that he felt might compromise his beliefs—including a role with sex symbol Marilyn Monroe. In one of his first films, April Love, the director, Henry Levin, wanted him to give co-star Shirley Jones a kiss (which was not in the script). Since this would be his first onscreen kiss, Boone said that he wanted to talk to his wife first, to make sure it was all right with her. He had his own film production company, Cooga Mooga Productions.

 

He appeared as a regular performer on Arthur Godfrey and His Friends from 1955 through 1957, and later hosted his own The Pat Boone Chevy Showroom, on Thursday evenings. In the early 1960s, he began writing a series of self-help books for adolescents, including Twixt Twelve and Twenty.

The British Invasion ended Boone’s career as a hitmaker, though he continued recording throughout the 1960s.

In the 1970s, he switched to gospel and country, and he continued performing in other media, as well.

pat boone speedy gonzales

pat boone speedy gonzales

In 1959, Boone’s likeness was licensed to DC Comics, first appearing in Superman’s Girl Friend, Lois Lane #9 (May 1959) before starring in his own series from the publisher which lasted for five issues from September 1959 to May 1960.

 

In the 1960s and 1970s. the Boone family toured as gospel singers and made gospel albums, such as The Pat Boone Family and The Family Who Prays.[citation needed]

 

In the early 1970s, Boone founded the record label Lamb & Lion Records. It featured artists such as Pat, the Pat Boone Family, Debby Boone, Dan Peek, DeGarmo and Key, and Dogwood.

 

In 1974, Boone was signed to the Motown country subsidiary Melodyland.

The label was later to be renamed Hitsville after a Christian church sued Motown’s president Berry Gordy over the use of the earlier name. The country subsidiary was closed in 1977.

pat boone

In 1978, Boone became the first target in the Federal Trade Commission’s crackdown on false-claim product endorsements by celebrities.

He had appeared with his daughter Debby in a commercial to claim that all four of his daughters had found a preparation named Acne-Statin a “real help” in keeping their skin clear.

The FTC filed a complaint against the manufacturer, contending that the product did not really keep skin free of blemishes. Boone eventually signed a consent order in which he promised not only to stop appearing in the ads, but also to pay about 2.5% of any money that the FTC or the courts might eventually order the manufacturer to refund to consumers.

Boone said, through a lawyer, that his daughters actually did use Acne-Statin, and that he was “dismayed to learn that the product’s efficacy had not been scientifically established as he believed.”

 

In 1956 Boone was one of the biggest recording stars in the US. Several film studios pursued him for movies; he decided to go with 20th Century Fox who made Elvis Presley’s first movie.

Fox reworked a play he had bought, Bernadine, into a vehicle for Boone. The resulting film was a solid hit, earning $3.75 million in the US.

Even more popular was April Love (1957), a remake of Home in Indiana. Boone regards it as one of his favourites, “the kind of movie I wish I could have made 20 more of: a musical, appealing characters, some drama, a good storyline, a happy ending, it’s the kind of film which makes you feel good. I never wanted to make a depressing or immoral film.”

In 1957 he was voted the third most popular star in the US.

 

Less popular was a musical comedy Mardi Gras (1958), which was the last movie of Edmund Goulding. However Journey to the Center of the Earth (1959), a science fiction adventure tale was a huge hit. Boone had been reluctant to do it, and needed to be persuaded by being offered the chance to sing several songs and given a percentage of the profits, but was glad he did.

 

He produced and starred in a documentary, Salute to the Teenagers (1960) but did not make a film for a while, studying acting with Sanford Meisner. He returned with a military comedy All Hands on Deck (1961), a mild hit.

He was one of several names in another remake, State Fair (1962), a box office disappointment. Musicals were becoming less fashionable in Hollywood, so Boone decided to take on a dramatic role in the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer-distributed movie The Main Attraction (1962) for Seven Arts Productions, his first movie outside Fox.

It was an unhappy experience for Boone as he disliked the implication his character had sex with Nancy Kwan’s and he got into several public fights with the producers.

 

He had a deal with Fox to make three films at $200,000 a film with his production company. This was meant to start with a thriller, The Yellow Canary (1963), in which Boone would play an unsympathetic character.

New management came in at the studio which was unenthusiastic about the picture but because Boone had a pay or play deal, they decided to make it anyway, only with a much shorter budget. Boone even paid some money out of his own pocket to help complete it.

 

Boone’s next movie for Fox was another low budget effort, The Horror of It All (1963), shot in England. He shot a comedy in Ireland Never Put It in Writing (1964) for Allied Artists. Boone’s third film for Fox was an “A” production, Goodbye Charlie (1964) but Boone was in support of Debbie Reynolds and Tony Curtis.

 

Boone was one of the many names in The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965). He appeared in The Perils of Pauline (1967), a pilot for a TV series that did not eventuate, which was screened in some theatres. Boone’s last film of note was The Cross and the Switchblade (1970).

 

In 1997, Boone released In a Metal Mood: No More Mr. Nice Guy, a collection of heavy metal covers. To promote the album, he appeared at the American Music Awards in black leather. He was then dismissed from Gospel America, a TV show on the Trinity Broadcasting Network. After making a special appearance on TBN with the president of the network, Paul Crouch, and his pastor, Jack Hayford, many fans accepted his explanation of the leather outfit being a “parody of himself”. Trinity Broadcasting then reinstated him, and Gospel America was brought back.

 

In 2003, the Nashville Gospel Music Association recognized his gospel recording work by inducting him into its Gospel Music Hall of Fame.

In September 2006, Boone released Pat Boone R&B Classics – We Are Family, featuring cover versions of 11 R&B hits, including the title track, plus “Papa’s Got A Brand New Bag”, “Soul Man”, “Get Down Tonight”, “A Woman Needs Love”, and six other classics.

 

Boone and his wife, Shirley, live in Beverly Hills, a suburb of Los Angeles. At one time, their neighbors were Ozzy Osbourne and his family.[citation needed] A sound-alike of Boone’s cover of Osbourne’s song “Crazy Train” became the theme song for The Osbournes (though the original Boone version appears on The Osbournes soundtrack).

Pat Boone

Pat Boone

In 2010, plans were announced for the Pat Boone Family Theater at Broadway at the Beach in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.[25] The attraction was never built.

 

In 2011 Boone acted as a spokesperson for Security One Lending, a reverse mortgage company.

 

Since at least 2007 Boone has acted as a spokesperson for Swiss America Trading Corporation, a broker of gold and silver coins that warns of “America’s Economic Collapse”.

 

Pat Boone grew up in the Church of Christ.

In the 1960s, Boone’s marriage nearly came to an end because of his use of alcohol and his preference for attending parties.

However, after coming into contact with the Charismatic Movement, Shirley began to focus more on her religion and eventually influenced Pat and their daughters toward a similar religious focus.

At this time, they attended the Inglewood Church of Christ in Inglewood, California.

In the spring of 1964, Boone spoke at a “Project Prayer” rally attended by 2,500 at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles.

The gathering, which was hosted by Anthony Eisley, a star of ABC’s Hawaiian Eye series, sought to flood the United States Congress with letters in support of school prayer, following two decisions in 1962 and 1963 of the United States Supreme Court which struck down the practice as in conflict with the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

 

Joining Boone and Eisley at the Project Prayer rally were Walter Brennan, Lloyd Nolan, Rhonda Fleming, Gloria Swanson, and Dale Evans. Boone declared, “what the communists want is to subvert and undermine our young people. … I believe in the power of aroused Americans, I believe in the wisdom of our Constitution. … the power of God.”

It was noted that Roy Rogers, John Wayne, Ronald Reagan, Mary Pickford, Jane Russell, Ginger Rogers, and Pat Buttram had endorsed the goals of the rally and would also have attended had their schedules not been in conflict.

 

In the early 1970s, the Boones hosted Bible studies for celebrities such as Doris Day, Glenn Ford, Zsa Zsa Gabor, and Priscilla Presley at their Beverly Hills home. The family then began attending The Church On The Way in Van Nuys, a Foursquare Gospel megachurch pastored by Jack Hayford.

 

 

On an April 22, 2016, broadcast of Fox News Radio’s The Alan Colmes Show, Boone discussed an episode of Saturday Night Live which included a sketch entitled God Is A Boob Man; the sketch parodied the film God’s Not Dead 2 in which Boone had a role.

He described the sketch as “blasphemy”, stating that the Federal Communications Commission should forbid any such content, and that it should revoke the broadcast licenses of any “network, or whoever is responsible for the shows.”

 

 

 

 

 

Sources : Wikipedia / Youtube

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Bruce Springsteen


Bruce Frederick Joseph Springsteen (born September 23, 1949) is an American singer-songwriter, known for his work with the E Street Band. Nicknamed “The Boss”.

Bruce Springsteen

Bruce Springsteen

 

He is widely known for his brand of poetic lyrics, Americana, working class, sometimes political sentiments centered on his native New Jersey, his distinctive voice, and his lengthy and energetic stage performances—with concerts from the 1970s to the present decade running at up to four hours in length. His artistic endeavors reflect both his personal growth and the zeitgeist of the times.

 

Springsteen’s recordings have included both commercially accessible rock albums and more somber folk-oriented works. His most successful studio albums, Born to Run (1975) and Born in the U.S.A. (1984) find pleasures in the struggles of daily American life. He has sold more than 120 million records worldwide and more than 64 million records in the United States, making him one of the world’s best-selling artists of all time.

He has earned numerous awards for his work, including 20 Grammy Awards, two Golden Globes, and an Academy Award as well as being inducted into both the Songwriters Hall of Fame and the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame in 1999. In 2009, Springsteen was a Kennedy Center Honors recipient, in 2013 was named MusiCares person of the year, and in 2016 was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

He married Patti Scialfa in 1991, and the couple have had three children – Evan James, Jessica Rae and Sam Ryan.

Bruce Springsteen 1988

Bruce Frederick Joseph Springsteen was born on September 23, 1949, at Monmouth Medical Center in Long Branch, New Jersey.

He was brought home from the hospital to Freehold Borough where he spent his childhood. He lived on South Street and attended Freehold Borough High School. His father, Douglas Frederick Springsteen, was of Dutch and Irish ancestry, and worked as a bus driver, among other vocations, although he was mostly unemployed. Springsteen said his mother, Adele Ann (née Zerilli), a legal secretary and of Italian ancestry, was the main breadwinner.

His maternal grandfather was born in Vico Equense, a town near Naples.

He has two younger sisters, Virginia and Pamela. Pamela had a brief film career, but left acting to pursue still photography full-time; she took photos for his Human Touch, Lucky Town and The Ghost of Tom Joad albums.

 

Springsteen’s last name is topographic and of Dutch origin, literally translating to “jumping stone” but more generally meaning a kind of stone used as a stepping stone in unpaved streets or between two houses.

The Springsteens are among the early Dutch families who settled in the colony of New Netherland in the 1600s.

Raised a Roman Catholic, Springsteen attended the St. Rose of Lima Catholic school in Freehold Borough, where he was at odds with the nuns and rejected the strictures imposed upon him, even though some of his later music reflects a Catholic ethos and includes a few rock-influenced, traditional Irish-Catholic hymns

In a 2012 interview, he explained that it was his Catholic upbringing rather than political ideology that most influenced his music. He noted in the interview that his faith had given him a “very active spiritual life”, although he joked that this “made it very difficult sexually.” He added: “Once a Catholic, always a Catholic.”

In the ninth grade, Springsteen transferred to the public Freehold High School, but did not fit in there either. Former teachers have said he was a “loner, who wanted nothing more than to play his guitar.” He completed high school, but felt so uncomfortable that he skipped his own graduation ceremony. He briefly attended Ocean County College, but dropped out.

 

Springsteen grew up hearing fellow New Jersey singer Frank Sinatra on the radio. He became interested in being involved in music himself when, in 1956 at the age of seven, he saw Elvis Presley on The Ed Sullivan Show.

In 1964, Springsteen bought his first guitar for $18. 1964 was also an important year for Springsteen, having seen The Beatles’ appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show.

Thereafter he started playing for audiences with a band called the Rogues at local venues such as the Elks Lodge in Freehold. In 1965, Springsteen’s mother took out a loan to buy her 16-year-old son a $60 Kent guitar, an act he subsequently memorialized in his song “The Wish”.

 

In the same year, he went to the house of Tex and Marion Vinyard, who sponsored young bands in town. They helped him become the lead guitarist and subsequently one of the lead singers of the Castiles.

His first gig with the Castiles was possibly at a trailer park on New Jersey Route 34. The Castiles recorded two original songs at a public recording studio in Brick Township and played a variety of venues, including Cafe Wha? in Greenwich Village. Marion Vinyard said that she believed the young Springsteen when he promised he would make it big.

Called for conscription in the United States Armed Forces when he was 18, Springsteen failed the physical examination and did not serve in the Vietnam War. He had suffered a concussion in a motorcycle accident when he was 17, and this together with his “crazy” behavior at induction gave him a classification of 4F, which made him unacceptable for service.

 

In the late-1960s, Springsteen performed briefly in a power trio known as Earth, playing in clubs in New Jersey, with one major show at the Hotel Diplomat in New York City. Earth consisted of John Graham on bass, and Mike Burke on drums.

Bob Alfano was later added on organ, but was replaced for two gigs by Frank ‘Flash’ Craig.

Springsteen acquired the nickname “The Boss” during this period; when he played club gigs with a band he took on the task of collecting the band’s nightly pay and distributing it amongst his bandmates.

The nickname also reportedly sprang from games of Monopoly that Springsteen would play with other Jersey Shore musicians.

Springsteen is not fond of this nickname, due to his dislike of bosses, but seems to have since tacitly accepted it. Previously he had the nickname “Doctor”.

 

From 1969 through early 1971, Springsteen performed with Steel Mill (originally called Child), which included Danny Federici, Vini Lopez, Vinnie Roslin and later Steve Van Zandt and Robbin Thompson. During this time he performed regularly at venues on the Jersey Shore, in Richmond, Virginia, Nashville, Tennessee, and a set of gigs in California, quickly gathering a cult following.

San Francisco Examiner music critic Philip Elwood gave Springsteen credibility in his glowing assessment of Steel Mill: “I have never been so overwhelmed by totally unknown talent.” Elwood went on to praise their “cohesive musicality” and, in particular, singled out Springsteen as “a most impressive composer”.

 

His prolific songwriting ability, with “More words in some individual songs than other artists had in whole albums”, as his future record label would describe it in early publicity campaigns, brought his skill to the attention of several people who were about to change his life: new managers Mike Appel and Jim Cretecos, who in turn brought him to the attention of Columbia Records talent scout John Hammond, who auditioned Springsteen in May 1972.

 

Even after Springsteen gained international acclaim, his New Jersey roots showed through in his music, and he often praised “the great state of New Jersey” in his live shows. Drawing on his extensive local appeal, he has routinely sold out consecutive nights in major New Jersey, Philadelphia and New York venues. He has also made many surprise appearances at The Stone Pony and other shore nightclubs over the years.

Springsteen was signed to Columbia Records in 1972 by Clive Davis, after having initially piqued the interest of John Hammond, who had signed Bob Dylan to the same label a decade earlier.

Despite the expectations of Columbia Records’ executives that Springsteen would record an acoustic album, he brought many of his New Jersey-based colleagues into the studio with him, thus forming the E Street Band (although it would not be formally named for several months). His debut album Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J., released in January 1973, established him as a critical favorite[20] though sales were slow.

Bruce Springsteen and Bryan Adams

Bruce Springsteen and Bryan Adams

In September 1973, Springsteen’s second album The Wild, the Innocent & the E Street Shuffle was released, again to critical acclaim but no commercial success. Springsteen’s songs became grander in form and scope, with the E Street Band providing a less folksy, more R&B vibe, and the lyrics often romanticized teenage street life. ”

In the May 22, 1974 issue of Boston’s The Real Paper music critic Jon Landau wrote, after seeing a performance at the Harvard Square Theater, “I saw rock and roll future, and its name is Bruce Springsteen.

And on a night when I needed to feel young, he made me feel like I was hearing music for the very first time.” Landau helped to finish the epic new album Born to Run and subsequently became Springsteen’s manager and producer. Given an enormous budget in a last-ditch effort at a commercially viable record, Springsteen became bogged down in the recording process while striving for a “Wall of Sound” production. But fed by the release of an early mix of “Born to Run” to nearly a dozen radio stations, anticipation built toward the album’s release.

 

On August 13, 1975, Springsteen and the E Street Band began a five-night, 10-show stand at New York’s The Bottom Line club. This attracted major media attention and was broadcast live on WNEW-FM. (Decades later, Rolling Stone magazine would name the stand as one of the 50 Moments That Changed Rock and Roll.)

Oklahoma City rock radio station WKY, in association with Carson Attractions, staged an experimental promotional event that resulted in a sold out house at the (6,000 seat) Civic Center Music Hall.

With the release of Born to Run on August 25, 1975, Springsteen finally found success. The album peaked at No. 3 on the Billboard 200, and while reception at US top 40 radio outlets for the album’s two singles was not overwhelming.

Bruce Springsteen

Bruce Springsteen

 

Springsteen appeared on the covers of both Time and Newsweek in the same week, on October 27 of that year. So great did the wave of publicity become that he eventually rebelled against it during his first venture overseas, tearing down promotional posters before a concert appearance in London

By the late 1970s, Springsteen had earned a reputation in the pop world as a songwriter whose material could provide hits for other bands. Manfred Mann’s Earth Band had achieved a US No. 1 pop hit with a heavily rearranged version of Greetings’ “Blinded by the Light” in early 1977.

Patti Smith reached No. 13 with her take on Springsteen’s unreleased “Because the Night” (with revised lyrics by Smith) in 1978, while The Pointer Sisters hit No. 2 in 1979 with Springsteen’s also unreleased “Fire”. Although not a critical success, long time friend Southside Johnny recorded Springsteen’s “The Fever” in early 1976 and “Talk to Me” in 1978. The two of them along with Steve Van Zandt collaborated to produce “Trapped Again” in 1978.

 

In September 1979, Springsteen and the E Street Band joined the Musicians United for Safe Energy anti-nuclear power collective at Madison Square Garden for two nights, playing an abbreviated set while premiering two songs from his upcoming album.

Springsteen continued to focus on working-class life with the 20-song double album The River in 1980, which included an intentionally paradoxical range of material from good-time party rockers to emotionally intense ballads, and finally yielded his first hit Top Ten single as a performer, “Hungry Heart”.

The River was followed in 1982 by the stark solo acoustic Nebraska. Recording sessions had been held to expand on a demo tape Springsteen had made at his home on a simple, low-tech four-track tape deck. However, during the recording process Springsteen and producer Jon Landau realized the songs worked better as solo acoustic numbers than full band renditions and the original demo tape was released as the album.

Although the recordings of the E Street Band were shelved, other songs from these sessions would later be released, including “Born in the U.S.A” and “Glory Days”.

Springsteen is probably best known for his album Born in the U.S.A. (1984), which sold 15 million copies in the U.S., 30 million worldwide, and became one of the best-selling albums of all time with seven singles hitting the Top 10.

Bruce Springsteen cover album

During the Born in the U.S.A. Tour, Springsteen met actress Julianne Phillips, whom he would marry in 1985. He also that year took part in the recording of the USA For Africa charity song “We Are The World”; however he declined to play at Live Aid. He later stated that he “simply did not realise how big the whole thing was going to be”.

He has since expressed regret at turning down Bob Geldof’s invitation, stating that he could have played a couple of acoustic songs had there been no slot available for a full band performance.

 

Springsteen was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1999 by Bono (the lead singer of U2), a favor he returned in 2005.

 

In 2002, Springsteen released his first studio effort with the full band in 18 years, The Rising, produced by Brendan O’Brien. The album, mostly a reflection on the September 11 attacks, was a critical and popular success. (Many of the songs were influenced by phone conversations Springsteen had with family members of victims of the attacks who in their obituaries had mentioned how his music touched their lives.)

The title track gained airplay in several radio formats, and the record became Springsteen’s best-selling album of new material in 15 years.

At the Grammy Awards of 2003, Springsteen performed The Clash’s “London Calling” along with Elvis Costello, Dave Grohl, and E Street Band member Steven Van Zandt and No Doubt’s bassist, Tony Kanal, in tribute to Joe Strummer; Springsteen and the Clash had once been considered multiple-album-dueling rivals at the time of the double The River and the triple Sandinista!.

 

In 2004, Springsteen and the E Street Band participated in the Vote for Change tour, along with John Mellencamp, John Fogerty, the Dixie Chicks, Pearl Jam, R.E.M., Bright Eyes, the Dave Matthews Band, Jackson Browne, and other musicians.

 

Devils & Dust was released on April 26, 2005, and was recorded without the E Street Band. It is a low-key, mostly acoustic album, in the same vein as Nebraska and The Ghost of Tom Joad although with a little more instrumentation.

Some of the material was written almost 10 years earlier during, or shortly after, the Ghost of Tom Joad Tour, with a few having been performed then but not released.

In the early 1980s, Springsteen met Patti Scialfa at The Stone Pony, a bar in New Jersey where local musicians regularly perform. On that particular evening she was performing alongside one of Springsteen’s pals, Bobby Bandiera, with whom she had written “At Least We Got Shoes” for Southside Johnny. Springsteen liked her voice and after the performance, introduced himself to her. Soon after that, they started spending time together and became friends.

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN 3

Early in 1984, Springsteen asked Scialfa to join the E Street Band for the upcoming Born in the U.S.A. Tour. According to the book Bruce Springsteen on Tour 1969–2005 by Dave Marsh, it looked like Springsteen and Scialfa were on the brink of becoming a couple through the first leg of the tour. But before that could happen, Barry Bell introduced Julianne Phillips to Springsteen and on May 13, 1985, they were married.

 

Springsteen and Scialfa lived in New Jersey, before moving to Los Angeles, where they decided to start a family.

On July 25, 1990, Scialfa gave birth to the couple’s first child, Evan James Springsteen.

On June 8, 1991, Springsteen and Scialfa married at their Los Angeles home in a very private ceremony, only attended by family and close friends.

Their second child, Jessica Rae Springsteen, was born on December 30, 1991; and their third child, Samuel Ryan Springsteen, was born on January 5, 1994.

In April 2006, Springsteen released We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Sessions.

Springsteen’s next album, titled Magic, was released on October 2, 2007. Recorded with the E Street Band, it had 10 new Springsteen songs plus “Long Walk Home”, performed once with the Sessions band, and a hidden track (the first included on a Springsteen studio release), “Terry’s Song”, a tribute to Springsteen’s long-time assistant Terry Magovern, who died on July 30, 2007.

Magic debuted at No. 1 in Ireland and the UK. Greatest Hits reentered the Irish charts at No. 57, and Live in Dublin almost cracked the top 20 in Norway again. Sirius Satellite Radio also restarted E Street Radio on September 27, 2007, in anticipation of Magic.

Radio conglomerate Clear Channel Communications was alleged to have sent an edict to its classic rock stations to not play any songs from the new album, while continuing to play older Springsteen material.

 

Bruce Springsteen album

 

 

Sources:  YouTube / Wikipedia

For further informations about Bruce Springsteen’s tours :

website:   brucespringsteen.net

 

Ryan O’Neil


Charles Patrick Ryan O’Neal (born April 20, 1941) is an American actor and former boxer. O’Neal trained as an amateur boxer before beginning his career in acting in 1960.

Ryan O neal

Ryan O neal

In 1964, he landed the role of Rodney Harrington on the ABC nighttime soap opera Peyton Place. The series was an instant hit and boosted O’Neal’s career. He later found success in films, most notably Love Story (1970), for which he received Academy Award and Golden Globe nominations as Best Actor, What’s Up, Doc? (1972), Paper Moon (1973), Stanley Kubrick‘s Barry Lyndon (1975), and A Bridge Too Far (1977). He had a recurring role in the TV series Bones as Max, the father of the series’ protagonist.

O’Neal was born in Los Angeles, California, the eldest son of actress Patricia Ruth Olga (née Callaghan; 1907–2003) and novelist and screenwriter Charles O’Neal.

His father was of English and Irish descent, while his mother was of paternal Irish and maternal Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry.

His brother, Kevin, is an actor and screenwriter.

Ryan O neal in Peyton Place

Ryan O neal in Peyton Place

O’Neal attended University High School in Los Angeles, and trained there to become a Golden Gloves boxer. During the late 1950s, his father had a job writing on a television series called Citizen Soldier, and moved the family to Munich, where O’Neal attended Munich American High School.

 

O’Neal appeared in guest roles on series that included The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis, Leave It to Beaver, Bachelor Father, Westinghouse Playhouse, Perry Mason and Wagon Train.

From 1962 to 1963, he was a regular on NBC’s Empire, another modern day western, where he played “Tal Garrett”. Also, was in an episode of My Three Sons as Chug Williams in 1962.

 

In 1964 he was cast as Rodney Harrington in the prime time serial drama Peyton Place. The series was a big success, making national names of its cast including O’Neal. Several were offered movie roles, including Mia Farrow and Barbara Parkins.

 

Eventually O’Neal was cast in the lead of The Big Bounce (1969), based on an Elmore Leonard novel. Then he played an Olympic athlete in The Games (1970). Neither film was particularly successful.

The Games had been co written by Erich Segal, who recommended O’Neal for the lead in Love Story, based on Segal’s novel and script.

A number of actors had turned down the role including Beau Bridges and Jon Voight before it was offered to O’Neal. His fee was $25,000; he had an offer that paid five times as much to appear in a Jerry Lewis film but O’Neal knew that Love Story was the better prospect and selected that instead.

“I hope the young people like it,” he said before the film came out. “I don’t want to go back to TV. I don’t want to go back to those NAB conventions.”

 

In between the film’s production and release. O’Neal appeared in a TV movie written by Eric Ambler, Love Hate Love, which received good ratings. He also made a Western, Wild Rovers with William Holden for director Blake Edwards.

 

Love Story turned out to be a box office phenomenon. It made O’Neal a star and earned him a nomination for an Academy Award for Best Actor (although O’Neal was bitter he was never given a percentage of the profits, unlike co-star Ali MacGraw).

 

Wild Rovers, badly cut by MGM, was considerably less popular, yet O’Neal was going to make another film for MGM, Deadly Honeymoon from a novel by Larry Block.

However, O’Neal pulled out – Peter Bogdanovich later said MGM head Jim Aubrey was “cruel” to O’Neal.

(The film became Nightmare Honeymoon.) He was also wanted by director Nic Roeg to appear opposite Julie Christie in an adaptation of Out of Africa that was never made.

 

Instead O’Neal starred in What’s Up Doc? (1972) for Bogdanovich opposite Barbra Streisand. This was the third-highest-grossing film of 1972 and led to him receiving an offer to star in a movie for Stanley Kubrick, Barry Lyndon.

While that was in pre production, O’Neal played a jewel thief in The Thief Who Came to Dinner (1972) opposite Jacqueline Bisset and Warren Oates. Then he was reunited with Bogdanovich for Paper Moon (1973) in which he starred opposite his daughter Tatum O’Neal. Tatum won an Oscar for her performance in a very popular movie and in 1973, Ryan O’Neal was voted by exhibitors as the second most popular star in the country, behind Clint Eastwood.

O’Neal spent over a year making Barry Lyndon (1975) for Kubrick.

The resulting film was considered a commercial disappointment and had a mixed critical reception; it won O’Neal a Harvard Lampoon Award for the Worst Actor of 1975. Its reputation has risen in recent years but O’Neal says his career never recovered from the film’s reception.

“Oh it’s all right but he [Kubrick] completely changed the picture during the year he spent editing it,” said O’Neal.

O’Neal had been originally meant to star in Bogdanovich’s At Long Last Love but was replaced by Burt Reynolds. He made Nickelodeon (1976) with Reynolds, Bogdanovich and Tatum O’Neal, for a fee of $750,000. The film flopped at the box office.

 

He followed this with a small role in the all-star war film A Bridge Too Far (1977), playing General James Gavin. O’Neal’s performance as a hardened general was much criticised, although O’Neal was only a year older than Gavin at the time of the events in the film.

“Can I help it if I photograph like I’m 16 and they gave me a helmet that was too big for my head?” he later said. “At least I did my own parachute jump.”

The film performed poorly at the US box office but did well in Europe.

O’Neal initially turned down a reported $3 million to star in Oliver’s Story (1978), a sequel to Love Story.

Instead he appeared in the car-chase film The Driver (1978), directed by Walter Hill, who had written The Thief Who Came to Dinner.

This was a box office disappointment in the US but, like A Bridge Too Far, did better overseas. Hill later said he “was so pleased with Ryan in the movie and I was very disappointed that people didn’t particularly give him any credit for what he did. To me, he’s the best he’s ever been. I cannot imagine another actor.”

O’Neal was meant to follow this with The Champ (1979), directed by Franco Zeffirelli, but decided to pull out after Zeffirelli refused to cast O’Neal’s son Griffin opposite him.[13] Instead he agreed to make Oliver’s Story after all once the script was rewritten.

However the film was a flop at the box office.

 

“What I have to do now, seriously, is win a few hearts as an actor,” he said in 1978. “The way Cary Grant did. I know I’ve got a lot of winning to do. But I’m young enough. I’ll get there…”

 

Around this time, O’Neal was meant to star in The Bodyguard, from a Lawrence Kasdan script, opposite Diana Ross for director John Boorman. However the film fell over when Ross pulled out, and it would not be made until 1992, with Kevin Costner in O’Neal’s old role.

There was some talk he would appear in a film from Michelangelo Antonioni, Suffer or Die, but this did not eventuate.

 

O’Neal instead played a boxer in a comedy, The Main Event, reuniting him with Streisand. He received a fee of $1 million plus a percentage of the profits. The Main Event was a sizeable hit at the box office.

 

A 1980 profile of O’Neal described him:

 

“           Unlike most stars of the post-Hoffman era he is very handsome, especially when moustached: he has blond curly hair and a toothpaste smile: he seems to lead an interesting life.

Maybe he would really come on if he had the apprenticeship of the stars of the 30s: for he is, to underline the point, a throwback to that era. There are no nervous tics, solemnity is at bag; his is an easy, genial presence, and thank heaven for it!      ”

O’Neal was looking to follow it as the lead in the film version of The Thorn Birds to be directed by Arthur Hiller but the book ended up being adapted as a mini series.

Instead O’Neal made a British-financed thriller, Green Ice (1981), for the most money he had ever received up front.

The movie had a troublesome production (the original director quit during filming) and flopped at the box office.

Ryan O Neal and Farah Fawcett

Ryan O Neal and Farah Fawcett

He had a cameo in Circle of Two, a film his daughter made with Richard Burton.

O’Neal says Burton told him during filming he was “five years away from winning acceptance as a serious actor. On the other hand, my agent, Sue Mengers says I’m right on the threshold. Split the difference, that’s two and a half years. One good picture, that’s all I need…”

 

However, in the early 80s he focused on comedies. He received $2 million for the lead in So Fine.

This was followed by Partners (1982), a farce written by Francis Veber in which O’Neal played a straight cop who goes undercover as one half of a gay couple.

He then played a film director loosely based on Peter Bogdanovich in Irreconcilable Differences (1984); he received no upfront fee but got a percentage of the profits.

It was a minor box office success.

 

A 1984 profile called him “the Billy Martin of Hollywood, whether it’s his love affair with Farrah Fawcett… his precocious actor daughter Tatum or fisticuffs with his son Griffin. He just can’t seem to stay out of the news.” O’Neal said he felt more like Rocky Marciano, “wondering why guys are always picking fights with me. If I’m in a good picture, they’ll like me. If I’m not they’ll hate me. Hey I’m mad too when I don’t make good pictures.”

 

O’Neal said too many of the roles he had played were “off the beaten path for me”.[6] In particular he regretted doing The Thief Who Came to Dinner, A Bridge Too Far, The Driver, So Fine, Partners and Green Ice.

He blamed this in part on having to pay alimony and child support. He also said agent Sue Mengers encouraged him to constantly work.

 

“If I could get a good director to choose me for a picture, I was okay,” he said. “But they stopped calling me in the mid-70s… I made a whole bunch of pictures that didn’t make any money and people lost interest in me… Directors take me reluctantly. I feel I’m lucky to be here in the first place and they know it too. I’m a glamour boy, a Hollywood product. I have a TV background and they can point to the silly movies I’ve made.”

 

He tried something different playing a gambler in Fever Pitch (1985), the last movie for Richard Brooks. Even less conventional was Tough Guys Don’t Dance (1987) for director Norman Mailer. Both movies flopped at the box office.

 

O’Neal had a good supporting role in the romantic comedy Chances Are (1989). He returned to TV opposite his then-partner Farrah Fawcett in Small Sacrifices (1989).

 

He and Fawcett made a short-lived CBS series Good Sports (1991).

 

He had a good role in Faithful (1996) with Cher. It was directed by Paul Mazursky who later said of O’Neal:

 

He’s sweet as sugar, and he’s volatile. He’s got some of that Irish stuff in him, and he can blow up a bit. One day he was doing a scene, and I said, ‘Bring it down a little bit,’ and Ryan said, ‘I quit! You can’t say “Bring it down” to me that loud!’ I said, ‘If you quit, I’m going to break your nose.’ He started to cry. He’s sort of a big baby at times, but he’s a good guy, and he’s very talented. He’s had a strange career, but he was a monster star.

 

He is a recurring character on Fox’s Bones (2007–2017; died in the hospital after a shootout saving his grandchildren).

 

In 2011, Ryan and Tatum attempted to restore their broken father/daughter relationship after 25 years. Their reunion and reconciliation process was captured in the Oprah Winfrey Network series, Ryan and Tatum: The O’Neals.

 

In 2016, O’Neal reunited with Love Story co-star Ali MacGraw in a staging of A.R. Gurney’s play Love Letters.

Ryan O neal and Ali Mac Graw

Ryan O neal and Ali Mac Graw

 

O’Neal said that in 2009 he “made a tremendous amount of money on real estate, more than [he] deserve[s]”.

 

O’Neal was in a long-term relationship with actress Farrah Fawcett from 1979 until 1997.

They then reunited in 2001 and were together until her death in 2009.

He was previously married to actresses Joanna Moore and Leigh Taylor-Young; both marriages ended in divorce.

He has four children: Tatum O’Neal and Griffin O’Neal (with Moore), Patrick O’Neal (with Taylor-Young), and Redmond James Fawcett O’Neal (with Fawcett).

 

“I got married at 20, and I was not a real mature 20,” said O’Neal. “My first child was born when I was 21. I was a man’s man; I didn’t discover women until I was married, and then it was too late.”

O’Neal had custody of Tatum and Griffin due to his first wife’s drug and alcohol issues. He had romances with Ursula Andress, Bianca Jagger, Anouk Aimee, Jacqueline Bisset, Barbra Streisand, Diana Ross, and Anjelica Huston.

For several years, O’Neal was estranged from his elder three children. However, in 2011, Tatum reconciled with her father with a book and a television show. On August 4, O’Neal, Tatum, and Patrick attended Redmond’s court appearance on firearms and drug charges.

Ryan Oneal

Ryan Oneal

In 2001, O’Neal was diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). After struggling with leukemia, O’Neal was frequently seen at Fawcett’s side when she was battling cancer.

He told People magazine, “It’s a love story. I just don’t know how to play this one. I won’t know this world without her. Cancer is an insidious enemy.” In April 2012, O’Neal revealed he had been diagnosed with stage IV prostate cancer. He reported that it had been detected early enough to give a prognosis of full recovery.

 

Also : https://radiosatellite.co/2018/01/14/ali-mac-graw

 

 

Sources : Wikipedia / YouTube

Ali Mac Graw


Elizabeth Alice “Ali” MacGraw (born April 1, 1939) is an American actress, model, author, and animal rights activist.

Ali MacGraw

Ali MacGraw

 

She first gained attention with her role in the 1969 film Goodbye, Columbus, for which she won the Golden Globe Award for Most Promising Newcomer. She reached international fame in 1970’s Love Story, for which she was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress and won the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama.

In 1972, MacGraw was voted the top female box office star in the world and was honored with a hands and footprints ceremony at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre after having been in just three films. She went on to star in the popular action films The Getaway (1972) and Convoy (1978) as well as the romantic sports drama Players (1979), the comedy Just Tell Me What You Want (1980), and the historical novel-based television miniseries The Winds of War (1983). In 1991, she published an autobiography, Moving Pictures.

MacGraw was born in Pound Ridge, New York, the daughter of commercial artists Frances (née Klein; 1901–1980)  and Richard MacGraw.

She has one brother, Dick, an artist. Her father was adopted. Her maternal grandparents were from Budapest, Hungary, of Jewish heritage.

MacGraw’s mother chose not to disclose her true ethnicity to her father, instead professing ignorance about it. “I think Daddy was bigoted,” MacGraw has said.

Her mother was considered a “pioneer” as an artist, who had taught school in Paris before settling in Greenwich Village.

Her parents married when her mother was 40: “My gorgeous father: a combination of Tyrone Power and a mystery, a brilliant artist and a brain beyond brains.”

He was born in New Jersey with his childhood spent in an orphanage. He ran away to sea when he was 16 and studied art in Munich. MacGraw adds, “Daddy was frightened and really, really angry. He never forgave his real parents for giving him up.”

As an adult, he constantly suppressed the rage he built up against his parents.

She described her father as “violent”.

Beginning in 1960, MacGraw spent six years working at Harper’s Bazaar magazine as a photographic assistant to fashion maven Diana Vreeland.

She worked at Vogue magazine as a fashion model, and as a photographer’s stylist. She has also worked as an interior decorator.

ALI Mac Graw

ALI Mac Graw

MacGraw started her acting career in television commercials, including one for the Polaroid Swinger camera. MacGraw gained critical notice in the 1969 film Goodbye, Columbus, but real stardom came in 1970 when she starred opposite Ryan O’Neal in Love Story, one of the highest-grossing films in U.S. history.

MacGraw was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress for that performance. Following Love Story, MacGraw was celebrated on the cover of Time magazine.

 

In 1972, after appearing in just three films, she had her footprints and autograph engraved at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre. She then starred opposite Steve McQueen in The Getaway (1972), which was one of the year’s top ten films at the box office.

Having taken a five-year break from acting, in 1978 MacGraw re-emerged in another box office hit, Convoy (1978), opposite Kris Kristofferson. She then appeared in the films Players (1979) and Just Tell Me What You Want (1980), directed by Sidney Lumet.

In 1983, MacGraw starred in the highly successful television miniseries The Winds of War.

In 1985, MacGraw joined hit ABC prime-time soap opera Dynasty as Lady Ashley Mitchell, which, she admitted in a 2011 interview, she did for the money.

She appeared in 14 episodes of the show before her character was killed off in the infamous “Moldavian wedding massacre” cliffhanger episode in 1985.

MacGraw made her Broadway theatre debut in New York City in 2006 as a dysfunctional matriarch in the drama Festen (The Celebration).

In 2016, MacGraw reunited with Love Story co-star Ryan O’Neal in a staging of A.R. Gurney’s play Love Letters.

In 1991, People magazine selected MacGraw as one of its “50 Most Beautiful People” in the World.

 

In 2008 GQ magazine listed her in their “Sexiest 25 Women in Film Ever” edition.

Having become a Hatha Yoga devotee in her early 50s, MacGraw produced a yoga video with the American Yoga Master Erich Schiffmann, Ali MacGraw Yoga Mind and Body.

This video was a bestseller upon release and still popular more than a decade later. The video’s impact was such that in June 2007 Vanity Fair magazine credited MacGraw with being one of the people responsible for the practice’s recent popularity in the United States.

In July 2006, MacGraw filmed a public service announcement for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), urging residents to take their pets with them in the event of wildfires.

In 2008, she wrote the foreword to the book Pawprints of Katrina  by author Cathy Scott and photography by Clay Myers about Best Friends Animal Society and the largest pet rescue in U.S. history.

An animal rights advocate throughout her life, she received the Humane Education Award by Animal Protection of New Mexico for speaking out about animal issues.

 

MacGraw has acknowledged having had an abortion in her early twenties, at a time when the procedure was illegal.

After college, she married Robin Hoen, a Harvard-educated banker, but they divorced after a year and a half.

Ali and Kris Kristofferson in Convoy

Ali and Kris Kristofferson in Convoy

On October 24, 1969, MacGraw married film producer Robert Evans; their son, Josh Evans, is an actor, director, producer and screenwriter.

They divorced in 1972 after she became involved with Steve McQueen on the set of The Getaway. She married McQueen on August 31, 1973, in Cheyenne, Wyoming, and divorced him in 1978.

 

 

 

 

 

MacGraw’s autobiography, Moving Pictures revealed her struggles with alcohol and sex addiction. She was treated for the former at the Betty Ford Center.

 

When former husband Evans received his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2002, she accompanied him. Their grandson Jackson was born in December 2010 to Josh and his wife, singer Roxy Saint.

 

Since 1994 she has lived in Tesuque, New Mexico, after “fleeing Malibu” when a house she was renting burned down.

 

Ali Mac Graw

Ali Mac Graw

 

 

Also :    https://radiosatellite.co/2018/01/14/ryan-oneil/

 

Sources : Youtube / Pinterest / Wikipedia

JOHN DENVER


RADIO SATELLITE

Henry John Deutschendorf, Jr. (December 31, 1943 – October 12, 1997), known professionally as John Denver.

John was an American singer, songwriter, actor, activist, and humanitarian. He was one of the most popular acoustic artists of the 1970s and one of the greatest songwriters of the 20th century. After traveling and living in numerous locations while growing up in his military family, Denver began his music career in folk music groups in the late 1960s. His greatest commercial success was as a solo singer, starting in the 1970s. Throughout his life, Denver recorded and released approximately 300 songs, about 200 of which he composed.Image

He performed primarily with an acoustic guitar and sang about his joy in nature, his enthusiasm for music, and his relationship trials. Denver’s music appeared on a variety of charts, including country and western, the Billboard Hot 100, and adult contemporary, in all earning him twelve…

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