KALINKA


No comment, no words could express what we could feel in watching this video. Just Enjoy it. Like it, share it to your friends and readers …

Aucun mot, aucun commentaire ne pourrait exprimer nos sentiments suite au visionnage de cette vidéo. Juste appréciez là à sa juste valeur. Likez, partagez… C’est à vous

 

 

 

Amaizing

Amaizing

TOP 100


TOP 100 of countries / Listeners  for MARCH 2018

Listeners by country and by connection for RADIO SATELLITE

Reminder: Radio Satellite plays “instrumental” music (#JamesLast, #FaustoPapetti, #EnnioMorricone, #Zamfir….)

Radio Satellite2 : Plays Oldies Pop Rock music and also Some soft jazz programs and blues.  (#Eric_Clapton, #Elton_john, #JohnDenver, #Abba, #BeeGees, #TheCarpenters, #TheEverlyBrothers, #The_Statler_Brothers, #Beatles, #BarryWhite, #TomJones and more…)

TOP20

 

TOP40

 

TOP60

 

TOP 80

 

 

 

TOP100

 

 

 

 

 

SIR CLIFF RICHARD ( Harry Rodger Webb )


RADIO SATELLITE

CLIFF RICHARDS : THE artist

He started life as Harry Webb and spent some of his childhood years in India. Cliff Richard was inspired by the music of Elvis Presley and at age 16, formed a band, ‘The Quintones’, with school friends and performed at their local Youth Club. From there, Cliff Richard went from strength to strength and became a global star.Image

Image

Having moved to India to help build a system of railways, Rodger Webb married Dorothy Dazely in 1939 and the following year the couple had a baby boy – Harry Rodger Webb.

Born in The King’s English Hospital in Lucknow, Harry was educated in Howrah, until his family moved to England in 1948, following Home Rule in India.

After a privileged life in India, the Webbs faced poverty, and were forced to sleep on mattresses at the houses of various relatives. In 1951, they were given a…

View original post 668 more words

They were… They are


They are stars

We know them as we saw them in the movies.

But time has passed and everyone is changing.

Here how we knew them
Here they are now mature and greater than before

 

ABBA

ABBA

ABBA

 

 

ART GARFUNKEL (Simon and Garfunkel 

ART AND GARFUNKEL

ART AND GARFUNKEL

 

 

BARBARA EDEN 

Barbara Eden

Barbara Eden

 

 

BARRY GIBB  (Bee Gees )

barry gibb bee gees

barry gibb bee gees

 

 

BOB DYLAN

Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan

 

 

CAT STEVENS

cat stevens

cat stevens

 

 

DAVID MC CALLUM

David Mc Callum

David Mc Callum

 

 

HARISON FORD

Harison Ford

Harison Ford

 

 

JOAN BAEZ

Joan baez

Joan baez

 

 

JULIE ANDREWS

JULIE ANDREWS

JULIE ANDREWS

 

SOUND OF MUSIC TEAM  ( Von Trapp family in movie)

Sound of music team

Sound of music team

 

 

PAUL ANKA

PAUL ANKA

PAUL ANKA

 

 

LEE  AAKER ( Aka RUSTY in RINTINTIN )

LEE AAKER AKA RUSTY in RINTINTIN

LEE AAKER AKA RUSTY in RINTINTIN

 

 

TOM HANKS

Tom Hanks

Tom Hanks

 

 

TOM JONES

TOM JONES

TOM JONES

 

Sources : Google

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pat Boone


Charles Eugene “Pat” Boone (born June 1, 1934) is an American singer, composer, actor, writer, television personality, motivational speaker, and spokesman. He was a successful pop singer in the United States during the 1950s and early 1960s.

 

pat Boone

pat Boone

He sold more than 45 million records, had 38 top-40 hits, and appeared in more than 12 Hollywood films.

According to Billboard, Boone was the second-biggest charting artist of the late 1950s, behind only Elvis Presley, and was ranked at No. 9 in its listing of the Top 100 Top 40 Artists 1955–1995.

Until the 2010s, Boone held the Billboard record for spending 220 consecutive weeks on the charts with one or more songs each week.

 

At the age of 23, he began hosting a half-hour ABC variety television series, The Pat Boone Chevy Showroom, which aired for 115 episodes (1957–1960). Many musical performers, including Edie Adams, Andy Williams, Pearl Bailey, and Johnny Mathis, made appearances on the show. His cover versions of rhythm and blues hits had a noticeable effect on the development of the broad popularity of rock and roll. Elvis Presley was the opening act for a 1955 Pat Boone show in Cleveland, Ohio.

 

As an author, Boone had a number-one bestseller in the 1950s (Twixt Twelve and Twenty, Prentice-Hall). In the 1960s, he focused on gospel music and is a member of the Gospel Music Hall of Fame. He continues to perform and speak as a motivational speaker, a television personality, and a conservative political commentator.

Boone was born Charles Eugene Boone on June 1, 1934, in Jacksonville, Florida, the son of Margaret Virginia (Pritchard) and Archie Altman Boone. Boone was reared primarily in Nashville, Tennessee, a place he still visits. His family moved to Nashville from Florida when Boone was two years old. He attended and graduated in 1952 from David Lipscomb High School in Nashville. His younger brother, whose professional name is Nick Todd, was also a pop singer in the 1950s and is now a church music leader.

pat Pat Boone

Pat Boone

In a 2007 interview on The 700 Club, Boone claimed that he is the great-great-great-great grandson of the American pioneer Daniel Boone.

He is a cousin of two stars of Western television series: Richard Boone of CBS’s Have Gun – Will Travel and Randy Boone, of NBC’s The Virginian and CBS’s Cimarron Strip.[citation needed] Research done a few years ago  by The Boone Society found that Pat and his siblings are not biological descendants of Daniel Boone, nor of any of Daniel’s brothers.

Pat’s siblings were notified and have acknowledged that the research done by The Boone Society is true.

 

In November 1953, when he was 19 years old, Boone married Shirley Lee Foley, daughter of country music great Red Foley and his wife, singer Judy Martin. They have four daughters: Cheryl Lynn (better known as Cherry), Linda Lee, Deborah Ann (better known as Debby), and Laura Gene. Starting in the late 1950s, Boone and his family were residents of Leonia, New Jersey.

In college, he primarily attended David Lipscomb College, later Lipscomb University, in Nashville. He graduated in 1958 from Columbia University School of General Studies magna cum laude[7] and also attended North Texas State University, now known as the University of North Texas, in Denton, Texas.

Boone began his career by performing in Nashville’s Centennial Park

He began recording in 1954 for Republic Records (not to be confused with the current label with that name), and by 1955, for Dot Records.

His 1955 version of Fats Domino’s “Ain’t That a Shame” was a hit. This set the stage for the early part of Boone’s career, which focused on covering R&B songs by black artists for a white American market.

Randy Wood, the owner of Dot, had issued an R&B single by the Griffin Brothers in 1951 called “Tra La La-a”—a different song from the later LaVern Baker one—and he was keen to put out another version after the original had failed. This became the B side of the first Boone single “Two Hearts Two Kisses”, originally by the Charms – whose “Hearts Of Stone” had been covered by the label’s Fontane Sisters.

Once the Boone version was in the shops, it spawned more covers by the Crew-Cuts, Doris Day, and Frank Sinatra.

A number-one single in 1956 by Boone was a second cover and a revival of a then seven-year-old song “I Almost Lost My Mind”, by Ivory Joe Hunter, which was originally covered by another black star, Nat King Cole.

 

According to an opinion poll of high-school students in 1957, the singer was nearly the “two-to-one favorite over Elvis Presley among boys and preferred almost three-to-one by girls …”

During the late 1950s, he made regular appearances on ABC-TV’s Ozark Jubilee, hosted by his father-in-law.

Pat Boone

Pat Boone

Boone cultivated a safe, wholesome, advertiser-friendly image that won him a long-term product endorsement contract from General Motors during the late 1950s, lasting through the 1960s.

He succeeded Dinah Shore singing the praises of the GM product: “See the USA in your Chevrolet … drive your Chevrolet through the USA, America’s the greatest land of all!” GM had also sponsored The Pat Boone Chevy Showroom.

In the 1989 documentary Roger & Me, Boone stated that he first was given a Chevrolet Corvette from the GM product line, but after his wife and he started having children, at one child a year, GM supplied him with a station wagon, as well.

 

Many of Boone’s hit singles were covers of hits from black R&B artists. These included: “Ain’t That a Shame” by Fats Domino; “Tutti Frutti” and “Long Tall Sally” by Little Richard;

“At My Front Door (Crazy Little Mama)” by The El Dorados; and the blues ballads “I Almost Lost My Mind” by Ivory Joe Hunter, “I’ll be Home” by the Flamingos and “Don’t Forbid Me” by Charles Singleton. Boone also wrote the lyrics for the instrumental theme song for the movie Exodus, which he titled “This Land Is Mine”. (Ernest Gold had composed the music.)

As a conservative Christian, Boone declined certain songs and movie roles that he felt might compromise his beliefs—including a role with sex symbol Marilyn Monroe. In one of his first films, April Love, the director, Henry Levin, wanted him to give co-star Shirley Jones a kiss (which was not in the script). Since this would be his first onscreen kiss, Boone said that he wanted to talk to his wife first, to make sure it was all right with her. He had his own film production company, Cooga Mooga Productions.

 

He appeared as a regular performer on Arthur Godfrey and His Friends from 1955 through 1957, and later hosted his own The Pat Boone Chevy Showroom, on Thursday evenings. In the early 1960s, he began writing a series of self-help books for adolescents, including Twixt Twelve and Twenty.

The British Invasion ended Boone’s career as a hitmaker, though he continued recording throughout the 1960s.

In the 1970s, he switched to gospel and country, and he continued performing in other media, as well.

pat boone speedy gonzales

pat boone speedy gonzales

In 1959, Boone’s likeness was licensed to DC Comics, first appearing in Superman’s Girl Friend, Lois Lane #9 (May 1959) before starring in his own series from the publisher which lasted for five issues from September 1959 to May 1960.

 

In the 1960s and 1970s. the Boone family toured as gospel singers and made gospel albums, such as The Pat Boone Family and The Family Who Prays.[citation needed]

 

In the early 1970s, Boone founded the record label Lamb & Lion Records. It featured artists such as Pat, the Pat Boone Family, Debby Boone, Dan Peek, DeGarmo and Key, and Dogwood.

 

In 1974, Boone was signed to the Motown country subsidiary Melodyland.

The label was later to be renamed Hitsville after a Christian church sued Motown’s president Berry Gordy over the use of the earlier name. The country subsidiary was closed in 1977.

pat boone

In 1978, Boone became the first target in the Federal Trade Commission’s crackdown on false-claim product endorsements by celebrities.

He had appeared with his daughter Debby in a commercial to claim that all four of his daughters had found a preparation named Acne-Statin a “real help” in keeping their skin clear.

The FTC filed a complaint against the manufacturer, contending that the product did not really keep skin free of blemishes. Boone eventually signed a consent order in which he promised not only to stop appearing in the ads, but also to pay about 2.5% of any money that the FTC or the courts might eventually order the manufacturer to refund to consumers.

Boone said, through a lawyer, that his daughters actually did use Acne-Statin, and that he was “dismayed to learn that the product’s efficacy had not been scientifically established as he believed.”

 

In 1956 Boone was one of the biggest recording stars in the US. Several film studios pursued him for movies; he decided to go with 20th Century Fox who made Elvis Presley’s first movie.

Fox reworked a play he had bought, Bernadine, into a vehicle for Boone. The resulting film was a solid hit, earning $3.75 million in the US.

Even more popular was April Love (1957), a remake of Home in Indiana. Boone regards it as one of his favourites, “the kind of movie I wish I could have made 20 more of: a musical, appealing characters, some drama, a good storyline, a happy ending, it’s the kind of film which makes you feel good. I never wanted to make a depressing or immoral film.”

In 1957 he was voted the third most popular star in the US.

 

Less popular was a musical comedy Mardi Gras (1958), which was the last movie of Edmund Goulding. However Journey to the Center of the Earth (1959), a science fiction adventure tale was a huge hit. Boone had been reluctant to do it, and needed to be persuaded by being offered the chance to sing several songs and given a percentage of the profits, but was glad he did.

 

He produced and starred in a documentary, Salute to the Teenagers (1960) but did not make a film for a while, studying acting with Sanford Meisner. He returned with a military comedy All Hands on Deck (1961), a mild hit.

He was one of several names in another remake, State Fair (1962), a box office disappointment. Musicals were becoming less fashionable in Hollywood, so Boone decided to take on a dramatic role in the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer-distributed movie The Main Attraction (1962) for Seven Arts Productions, his first movie outside Fox.

It was an unhappy experience for Boone as he disliked the implication his character had sex with Nancy Kwan’s and he got into several public fights with the producers.

 

He had a deal with Fox to make three films at $200,000 a film with his production company. This was meant to start with a thriller, The Yellow Canary (1963), in which Boone would play an unsympathetic character.

New management came in at the studio which was unenthusiastic about the picture but because Boone had a pay or play deal, they decided to make it anyway, only with a much shorter budget. Boone even paid some money out of his own pocket to help complete it.

 

Boone’s next movie for Fox was another low budget effort, The Horror of It All (1963), shot in England. He shot a comedy in Ireland Never Put It in Writing (1964) for Allied Artists. Boone’s third film for Fox was an “A” production, Goodbye Charlie (1964) but Boone was in support of Debbie Reynolds and Tony Curtis.

 

Boone was one of the many names in The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965). He appeared in The Perils of Pauline (1967), a pilot for a TV series that did not eventuate, which was screened in some theatres. Boone’s last film of note was The Cross and the Switchblade (1970).

 

In 1997, Boone released In a Metal Mood: No More Mr. Nice Guy, a collection of heavy metal covers. To promote the album, he appeared at the American Music Awards in black leather. He was then dismissed from Gospel America, a TV show on the Trinity Broadcasting Network. After making a special appearance on TBN with the president of the network, Paul Crouch, and his pastor, Jack Hayford, many fans accepted his explanation of the leather outfit being a “parody of himself”. Trinity Broadcasting then reinstated him, and Gospel America was brought back.

 

In 2003, the Nashville Gospel Music Association recognized his gospel recording work by inducting him into its Gospel Music Hall of Fame.

In September 2006, Boone released Pat Boone R&B Classics – We Are Family, featuring cover versions of 11 R&B hits, including the title track, plus “Papa’s Got A Brand New Bag”, “Soul Man”, “Get Down Tonight”, “A Woman Needs Love”, and six other classics.

 

Boone and his wife, Shirley, live in Beverly Hills, a suburb of Los Angeles. At one time, their neighbors were Ozzy Osbourne and his family.[citation needed] A sound-alike of Boone’s cover of Osbourne’s song “Crazy Train” became the theme song for The Osbournes (though the original Boone version appears on The Osbournes soundtrack).

Pat Boone

Pat Boone

In 2010, plans were announced for the Pat Boone Family Theater at Broadway at the Beach in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.[25] The attraction was never built.

 

In 2011 Boone acted as a spokesperson for Security One Lending, a reverse mortgage company.

 

Since at least 2007 Boone has acted as a spokesperson for Swiss America Trading Corporation, a broker of gold and silver coins that warns of “America’s Economic Collapse”.

 

Pat Boone grew up in the Church of Christ.

In the 1960s, Boone’s marriage nearly came to an end because of his use of alcohol and his preference for attending parties.

However, after coming into contact with the Charismatic Movement, Shirley began to focus more on her religion and eventually influenced Pat and their daughters toward a similar religious focus.

At this time, they attended the Inglewood Church of Christ in Inglewood, California.

In the spring of 1964, Boone spoke at a “Project Prayer” rally attended by 2,500 at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles.

The gathering, which was hosted by Anthony Eisley, a star of ABC’s Hawaiian Eye series, sought to flood the United States Congress with letters in support of school prayer, following two decisions in 1962 and 1963 of the United States Supreme Court which struck down the practice as in conflict with the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

 

Joining Boone and Eisley at the Project Prayer rally were Walter Brennan, Lloyd Nolan, Rhonda Fleming, Gloria Swanson, and Dale Evans. Boone declared, “what the communists want is to subvert and undermine our young people. … I believe in the power of aroused Americans, I believe in the wisdom of our Constitution. … the power of God.”

It was noted that Roy Rogers, John Wayne, Ronald Reagan, Mary Pickford, Jane Russell, Ginger Rogers, and Pat Buttram had endorsed the goals of the rally and would also have attended had their schedules not been in conflict.

 

In the early 1970s, the Boones hosted Bible studies for celebrities such as Doris Day, Glenn Ford, Zsa Zsa Gabor, and Priscilla Presley at their Beverly Hills home. The family then began attending The Church On The Way in Van Nuys, a Foursquare Gospel megachurch pastored by Jack Hayford.

 

 

On an April 22, 2016, broadcast of Fox News Radio’s The Alan Colmes Show, Boone discussed an episode of Saturday Night Live which included a sketch entitled God Is A Boob Man; the sketch parodied the film God’s Not Dead 2 in which Boone had a role.

He described the sketch as “blasphemy”, stating that the Federal Communications Commission should forbid any such content, and that it should revoke the broadcast licenses of any “network, or whoever is responsible for the shows.”

 

 

 

 

 

Sources : Wikipedia / Youtube

Read also : https://radiosatellite.co/2017/10/29/they-look-likes

https://radiosatellite.co/2017/11/11/barry-manilow

https://radiosatellite.co/2018/01/14/john-denver-2

https://radiosatellite.co/2017/10/26/fats-domino-02-1928-10-2017

https://radiosatellite.co/2016/11/27/home-free

Ryan O’Neil


Charles Patrick Ryan O’Neal (born April 20, 1941) is an American actor and former boxer. O’Neal trained as an amateur boxer before beginning his career in acting in 1960.

Ryan O neal

Ryan O neal

In 1964, he landed the role of Rodney Harrington on the ABC nighttime soap opera Peyton Place. The series was an instant hit and boosted O’Neal’s career. He later found success in films, most notably Love Story (1970), for which he received Academy Award and Golden Globe nominations as Best Actor, What’s Up, Doc? (1972), Paper Moon (1973), Stanley Kubrick‘s Barry Lyndon (1975), and A Bridge Too Far (1977). He had a recurring role in the TV series Bones as Max, the father of the series’ protagonist.

O’Neal was born in Los Angeles, California, the eldest son of actress Patricia Ruth Olga (née Callaghan; 1907–2003) and novelist and screenwriter Charles O’Neal.

His father was of English and Irish descent, while his mother was of paternal Irish and maternal Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry.

His brother, Kevin, is an actor and screenwriter.

Ryan O neal in Peyton Place

Ryan O neal in Peyton Place

O’Neal attended University High School in Los Angeles, and trained there to become a Golden Gloves boxer. During the late 1950s, his father had a job writing on a television series called Citizen Soldier, and moved the family to Munich, where O’Neal attended Munich American High School.

 

O’Neal appeared in guest roles on series that included The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis, Leave It to Beaver, Bachelor Father, Westinghouse Playhouse, Perry Mason and Wagon Train.

From 1962 to 1963, he was a regular on NBC’s Empire, another modern day western, where he played “Tal Garrett”. Also, was in an episode of My Three Sons as Chug Williams in 1962.

 

In 1964 he was cast as Rodney Harrington in the prime time serial drama Peyton Place. The series was a big success, making national names of its cast including O’Neal. Several were offered movie roles, including Mia Farrow and Barbara Parkins.

 

Eventually O’Neal was cast in the lead of The Big Bounce (1969), based on an Elmore Leonard novel. Then he played an Olympic athlete in The Games (1970). Neither film was particularly successful.

The Games had been co written by Erich Segal, who recommended O’Neal for the lead in Love Story, based on Segal’s novel and script.

A number of actors had turned down the role including Beau Bridges and Jon Voight before it was offered to O’Neal. His fee was $25,000; he had an offer that paid five times as much to appear in a Jerry Lewis film but O’Neal knew that Love Story was the better prospect and selected that instead.

“I hope the young people like it,” he said before the film came out. “I don’t want to go back to TV. I don’t want to go back to those NAB conventions.”

 

In between the film’s production and release. O’Neal appeared in a TV movie written by Eric Ambler, Love Hate Love, which received good ratings. He also made a Western, Wild Rovers with William Holden for director Blake Edwards.

 

Love Story turned out to be a box office phenomenon. It made O’Neal a star and earned him a nomination for an Academy Award for Best Actor (although O’Neal was bitter he was never given a percentage of the profits, unlike co-star Ali MacGraw).

 

Wild Rovers, badly cut by MGM, was considerably less popular, yet O’Neal was going to make another film for MGM, Deadly Honeymoon from a novel by Larry Block.

However, O’Neal pulled out – Peter Bogdanovich later said MGM head Jim Aubrey was “cruel” to O’Neal.

(The film became Nightmare Honeymoon.) He was also wanted by director Nic Roeg to appear opposite Julie Christie in an adaptation of Out of Africa that was never made.

 

Instead O’Neal starred in What’s Up Doc? (1972) for Bogdanovich opposite Barbra Streisand. This was the third-highest-grossing film of 1972 and led to him receiving an offer to star in a movie for Stanley Kubrick, Barry Lyndon.

While that was in pre production, O’Neal played a jewel thief in The Thief Who Came to Dinner (1972) opposite Jacqueline Bisset and Warren Oates. Then he was reunited with Bogdanovich for Paper Moon (1973) in which he starred opposite his daughter Tatum O’Neal. Tatum won an Oscar for her performance in a very popular movie and in 1973, Ryan O’Neal was voted by exhibitors as the second most popular star in the country, behind Clint Eastwood.

O’Neal spent over a year making Barry Lyndon (1975) for Kubrick.

The resulting film was considered a commercial disappointment and had a mixed critical reception; it won O’Neal a Harvard Lampoon Award for the Worst Actor of 1975. Its reputation has risen in recent years but O’Neal says his career never recovered from the film’s reception.

“Oh it’s all right but he [Kubrick] completely changed the picture during the year he spent editing it,” said O’Neal.

O’Neal had been originally meant to star in Bogdanovich’s At Long Last Love but was replaced by Burt Reynolds. He made Nickelodeon (1976) with Reynolds, Bogdanovich and Tatum O’Neal, for a fee of $750,000. The film flopped at the box office.

 

He followed this with a small role in the all-star war film A Bridge Too Far (1977), playing General James Gavin. O’Neal’s performance as a hardened general was much criticised, although O’Neal was only a year older than Gavin at the time of the events in the film.

“Can I help it if I photograph like I’m 16 and they gave me a helmet that was too big for my head?” he later said. “At least I did my own parachute jump.”

The film performed poorly at the US box office but did well in Europe.

O’Neal initially turned down a reported $3 million to star in Oliver’s Story (1978), a sequel to Love Story.

Instead he appeared in the car-chase film The Driver (1978), directed by Walter Hill, who had written The Thief Who Came to Dinner.

This was a box office disappointment in the US but, like A Bridge Too Far, did better overseas. Hill later said he “was so pleased with Ryan in the movie and I was very disappointed that people didn’t particularly give him any credit for what he did. To me, he’s the best he’s ever been. I cannot imagine another actor.”

O’Neal was meant to follow this with The Champ (1979), directed by Franco Zeffirelli, but decided to pull out after Zeffirelli refused to cast O’Neal’s son Griffin opposite him.[13] Instead he agreed to make Oliver’s Story after all once the script was rewritten.

However the film was a flop at the box office.

 

“What I have to do now, seriously, is win a few hearts as an actor,” he said in 1978. “The way Cary Grant did. I know I’ve got a lot of winning to do. But I’m young enough. I’ll get there…”

 

Around this time, O’Neal was meant to star in The Bodyguard, from a Lawrence Kasdan script, opposite Diana Ross for director John Boorman. However the film fell over when Ross pulled out, and it would not be made until 1992, with Kevin Costner in O’Neal’s old role.

There was some talk he would appear in a film from Michelangelo Antonioni, Suffer or Die, but this did not eventuate.

 

O’Neal instead played a boxer in a comedy, The Main Event, reuniting him with Streisand. He received a fee of $1 million plus a percentage of the profits. The Main Event was a sizeable hit at the box office.

 

A 1980 profile of O’Neal described him:

 

“           Unlike most stars of the post-Hoffman era he is very handsome, especially when moustached: he has blond curly hair and a toothpaste smile: he seems to lead an interesting life.

Maybe he would really come on if he had the apprenticeship of the stars of the 30s: for he is, to underline the point, a throwback to that era. There are no nervous tics, solemnity is at bag; his is an easy, genial presence, and thank heaven for it!      ”

O’Neal was looking to follow it as the lead in the film version of The Thorn Birds to be directed by Arthur Hiller but the book ended up being adapted as a mini series.

Instead O’Neal made a British-financed thriller, Green Ice (1981), for the most money he had ever received up front.

The movie had a troublesome production (the original director quit during filming) and flopped at the box office.

Ryan O Neal and Farah Fawcett

Ryan O Neal and Farah Fawcett

He had a cameo in Circle of Two, a film his daughter made with Richard Burton.

O’Neal says Burton told him during filming he was “five years away from winning acceptance as a serious actor. On the other hand, my agent, Sue Mengers says I’m right on the threshold. Split the difference, that’s two and a half years. One good picture, that’s all I need…”

 

However, in the early 80s he focused on comedies. He received $2 million for the lead in So Fine.

This was followed by Partners (1982), a farce written by Francis Veber in which O’Neal played a straight cop who goes undercover as one half of a gay couple.

He then played a film director loosely based on Peter Bogdanovich in Irreconcilable Differences (1984); he received no upfront fee but got a percentage of the profits.

It was a minor box office success.

 

A 1984 profile called him “the Billy Martin of Hollywood, whether it’s his love affair with Farrah Fawcett… his precocious actor daughter Tatum or fisticuffs with his son Griffin. He just can’t seem to stay out of the news.” O’Neal said he felt more like Rocky Marciano, “wondering why guys are always picking fights with me. If I’m in a good picture, they’ll like me. If I’m not they’ll hate me. Hey I’m mad too when I don’t make good pictures.”

 

O’Neal said too many of the roles he had played were “off the beaten path for me”.[6] In particular he regretted doing The Thief Who Came to Dinner, A Bridge Too Far, The Driver, So Fine, Partners and Green Ice.

He blamed this in part on having to pay alimony and child support. He also said agent Sue Mengers encouraged him to constantly work.

 

“If I could get a good director to choose me for a picture, I was okay,” he said. “But they stopped calling me in the mid-70s… I made a whole bunch of pictures that didn’t make any money and people lost interest in me… Directors take me reluctantly. I feel I’m lucky to be here in the first place and they know it too. I’m a glamour boy, a Hollywood product. I have a TV background and they can point to the silly movies I’ve made.”

 

He tried something different playing a gambler in Fever Pitch (1985), the last movie for Richard Brooks. Even less conventional was Tough Guys Don’t Dance (1987) for director Norman Mailer. Both movies flopped at the box office.

 

O’Neal had a good supporting role in the romantic comedy Chances Are (1989). He returned to TV opposite his then-partner Farrah Fawcett in Small Sacrifices (1989).

 

He and Fawcett made a short-lived CBS series Good Sports (1991).

 

He had a good role in Faithful (1996) with Cher. It was directed by Paul Mazursky who later said of O’Neal:

 

He’s sweet as sugar, and he’s volatile. He’s got some of that Irish stuff in him, and he can blow up a bit. One day he was doing a scene, and I said, ‘Bring it down a little bit,’ and Ryan said, ‘I quit! You can’t say “Bring it down” to me that loud!’ I said, ‘If you quit, I’m going to break your nose.’ He started to cry. He’s sort of a big baby at times, but he’s a good guy, and he’s very talented. He’s had a strange career, but he was a monster star.

 

He is a recurring character on Fox’s Bones (2007–2017; died in the hospital after a shootout saving his grandchildren).

 

In 2011, Ryan and Tatum attempted to restore their broken father/daughter relationship after 25 years. Their reunion and reconciliation process was captured in the Oprah Winfrey Network series, Ryan and Tatum: The O’Neals.

 

In 2016, O’Neal reunited with Love Story co-star Ali MacGraw in a staging of A.R. Gurney’s play Love Letters.

Ryan O neal and Ali Mac Graw

Ryan O neal and Ali Mac Graw

 

O’Neal said that in 2009 he “made a tremendous amount of money on real estate, more than [he] deserve[s]”.

 

O’Neal was in a long-term relationship with actress Farrah Fawcett from 1979 until 1997.

They then reunited in 2001 and were together until her death in 2009.

He was previously married to actresses Joanna Moore and Leigh Taylor-Young; both marriages ended in divorce.

He has four children: Tatum O’Neal and Griffin O’Neal (with Moore), Patrick O’Neal (with Taylor-Young), and Redmond James Fawcett O’Neal (with Fawcett).

 

“I got married at 20, and I was not a real mature 20,” said O’Neal. “My first child was born when I was 21. I was a man’s man; I didn’t discover women until I was married, and then it was too late.”

O’Neal had custody of Tatum and Griffin due to his first wife’s drug and alcohol issues. He had romances with Ursula Andress, Bianca Jagger, Anouk Aimee, Jacqueline Bisset, Barbra Streisand, Diana Ross, and Anjelica Huston.

For several years, O’Neal was estranged from his elder three children. However, in 2011, Tatum reconciled with her father with a book and a television show. On August 4, O’Neal, Tatum, and Patrick attended Redmond’s court appearance on firearms and drug charges.

Ryan Oneal

Ryan Oneal

In 2001, O’Neal was diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). After struggling with leukemia, O’Neal was frequently seen at Fawcett’s side when she was battling cancer.

He told People magazine, “It’s a love story. I just don’t know how to play this one. I won’t know this world without her. Cancer is an insidious enemy.” In April 2012, O’Neal revealed he had been diagnosed with stage IV prostate cancer. He reported that it had been detected early enough to give a prognosis of full recovery.

 

Also : https://radiosatellite.co/2018/01/14/ali-mac-graw

 

 

Sources : Wikipedia / YouTube

JOHN DENVER


RADIO SATELLITE

Henry John Deutschendorf, Jr. (December 31, 1943 – October 12, 1997), known professionally as John Denver.

John was an American singer, songwriter, actor, activist, and humanitarian. He was one of the most popular acoustic artists of the 1970s and one of the greatest songwriters of the 20th century. After traveling and living in numerous locations while growing up in his military family, Denver began his music career in folk music groups in the late 1960s. His greatest commercial success was as a solo singer, starting in the 1970s. Throughout his life, Denver recorded and released approximately 300 songs, about 200 of which he composed.Image

He performed primarily with an acoustic guitar and sang about his joy in nature, his enthusiasm for music, and his relationship trials. Denver’s music appeared on a variety of charts, including country and western, the Billboard Hot 100, and adult contemporary, in all earning him twelve…

View original post 4,727 more words

RadioSatellite2 : CLICK to listen live


Just Click to listen live RADIO SATELLITE2 ( US UK HITS FROM 70s to 90s)

Cliquez sur le bouton pour écouter RADIO SATELLITE ( HITS Années 70 à 90 )

RS2 CLICK AND LISTEN 300 X 300

 

 

RadioSatellite: CLICK to listen live


Just Click to listen live RADIO SATELLITE (INSTRUMENTAL)

Cliquez sur le bouton pour écouter RADIO SATELLITE (INSTRUMENTAL )

 

RS click and listen 300 X 300

Champs Elysées 2018


Countdown and fireworks from Paris

 

 

 

 

Souvenirs…..The Love Boat


The Love Boat is an American television series set on a cruise ship, which aired on the ABC Television Networkfrom May 5, 1977, until May 24, 1986; three-hour specials aired in 1986–87 and 1990.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

 

The series revolves around the ship’s captain (played by Gavin MacLeod) and a handful of its crew, with several passengers – played by various guest actors for each episode – having romantic and humorous adventures. It was part of ABC’s popular Saturday-night lineup that included Fantasy Island until that series ended in 1984.

The original 1976 made-for-TV movie on which the show was based (also titled The Love Boat) was itself based on the nonfiction book Love Boats by Jeraldine Saunders, a real-life cruise director. Two more TV movies (titled The Love Boat II and The New Love Boat) would follow before the series began its first season in September 1977.

The executive producer for the series was Aaron Spelling, who produced several TV series for Four Star, and ABC from the 1960s into the 1980s.

In 1997, the episode with segment titles “Hidden Treasure,” “Picture from the Past,” and “Ace’s Salary” (season 9, episode 3) was ranked No. 82 on TV Guide’s 100 Greatest Episodes of All Time. The Love Boat ran for nine seasons plus four specials. A made-for-TV movie, titled The Love Boat: A Valentine Voyage, starring four of the original cast members, aired on February 12, 1990.

Gavin MacLeod as Captain Merrill Stubing
Bernie Kopell as Dr. Adam “Doc” Bricker, ship’s physician
Fred Grandy as Burl “Gopher” Smith, Yeoman Purser (seasons 1–9)
Ted Lange as Isaac Washington, bartender
Lauren Tewes as Julie McCoy, Cruise Director (seasons 1–7, 9 (1 episode), 4 specials)
Jill Whelan as Vicki Stubing, the captain’s daughter (seasons 3–9, 4 specials, made-for-TV movie, plus a guest star appearance in Season 2 episode 8)
Ted McGinley as Ashley “Ace” Covington Evans, ship’s photographer (seasons 7–9),
Pat Klous as Judy McCoy, Julie’s sister and successor as cruise director (seasons 8–9)
MacLeod, Kopell and Lange are the only cast members to appear in every episode of the TV series as well as the last three made-for-TV movies. Grandy was in every episode throughout the run of the series, but was not in the last of the TV movies. MacLeod was not the captain of the Pacific Princess in the first two TV movies and did not appear in them, although when his character was introduced there was a mention of him being “the new captain”.
#Australia
#The_Love_Boat
#Canada
#The_Love_Boat
#Cyprus
#Toploio_tis_agapis
(The Ship of Love)
#Denmark
#The_Love_Boat
#Finland
#Lemmenlaiva
#Canada : #TheFunCruise

#France  #La_croisière_samuse

#Germany
#LoveBoat
#Gibraltar
#LoveBoat
#Greece
#ΤοΠλοίο_της_Αγάπης
(The Ship of Love)
#Hungary
#Szerelemhajó
#(Love Ship)
#Israel
ספינת_האהבה#
(The Love Boat)
#Italy
Love Boat
#Netherlands
The Love Boat
#New_Zealand
The Love Boat
#Norway
#Kjærlighetsskipet
(The Love Ship)
#Philippines
The Love Boat
#Poland
#Statek_miłości
(The Love Boat)
#Portugal
#Barc_ do_Amor
(The Love Boat)
#Slovakia
#Loď_lásky
(Love Ship)
#SouthAfrica
#Die_Plesierboot
(The Pleasure Boat)
#SouthKorea
#사랑의 유람선
(Cruise ship of Love)
#Thailand
#เรือรัก_เรือสำราญ
(Ship of Love, Ship of Fun)
#Spain
#Vacacione_En_el_mar
(Sea Holidays)
#Sweden
#Kärlek_ombord
(Love on Board)
#Taiwan
#愛之船
(The Boat of Love)
#Turkey
#Aşk_Gemisi
(The Love Boat)
#United_Kingdom
The Love Boat
#Venezuela

#Mexico
#El_Crucero_del_Amor
(The Boat of Love)

 

Sources Wikipedia

Barry Manilow


 

Barry Manilow

Remember this artist? Those Hits from 70s
It’s time to remember or even to discover

 

Click on video to listen to some of Barry’s Hits

 

 

 

Shirley MacLaine


Shirley MacLaine (born Shirley MacLean Beaty; April 24, 1934)  is an American film, television and theater actress, singer, dancer, activist and author.

 

An Academy Award winner, MacLaine received the 40th AFI Life Achievement Award from the American Film Institute in 2012, and received the Kennedy Center Honors for her lifetime contributions to American culture through the performing arts in 2013. She is known for her New Age beliefs, and has an interest in spirituality and reincarnation. She has written a series of autobiographical works that describe these beliefs, document her world travels, and describe her Hollywood career.

Shirley Mac Laine

Shirley Mac Laine

 

A six-time Academy Award nominee, MacLaine received a nomination for Best Documentary Feature for The Other Half of the Sky: A China Memoir (1975), and Best Actress nominations for Some Came Running (1958), The Apartment (1960), Irma la Douce (1963), and The Turning Point (1977), before winning Best Actress for Terms of Endearment (1983). She twice won the BAFTA Award for Best Foreign Actress, for Ask Any Girl (1959), and The Apartment (1960).

MacLaine won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Special for the 1976 TV special, Gypsy In My Soul. She has also won five competitive Golden Globe Awards and received the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award at the 1998 ceremony.

 

Named after Shirley Temple (who was 6 years old at the time), Shirley MacLean Beaty was born in Richmond, Virginia. Her father, Ira Owens Beaty, was a professor of psychology, public school administrator, and real estate agent, and her mother, Kathlyn Corinne (née MacLean), was a drama teacher, originally from Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada. MacLaine’s younger brother is the actor, writer and director Warren Beatty; he changed the spelling of his surname when he became an actor.

Their parents raised them as Baptists. Her uncle (her mother’s brother-in-law) was A. A. MacLeod, a Communist member of the Ontario legislature in the 1940s.

Shirley Mac Laine2

Shirley Mac Laine2

While MacLaine was still a child, Ira Beaty moved his family from Richmond to Norfolk, and then to Arlington and Waverly, eventually taking a position at Arlington’s Thomas Jefferson Junior High School. MacLaine played baseball in an all-boys team, holding the record for most home runs which earned her the nickname “Powerhouse”. During the 1950s, the family resided in the Dominion Hills section of Arlington.

As a toddler she had weak ankles and would fall over with the slightest misstep, so her mother decided to enroll her in ballet class at the Washington School of Ballet at the age of three.

This was the beginning of her interest in performing. Strongly motivated by ballet, she never missed a class. In classical romantic pieces like Romeo and Juliet and The Sleeping Beauty, she always played the boys’ roles due to being the tallest in the group and the absence of males in the class.

Eventually she had a substantial female role as the fairy godmother in Cinderella; while warming up backstage, she broke her ankle, but then tightened the ribbons on her toe shoes and proceeded to dance the role all the way through before calling for an ambulance.

Ultimately she decided against making a career of professional ballet because she had grown too tall and was unable to acquire perfect technique.

She explained that she didn’t have the ideal body type, lacking the requisite “beautifully constructed feet” of high arches, high insteps and a flexible ankle.

Also slowly realizing ballet’s propensity to be too all-consuming, and ultimately limiting, she moved on to other forms of dancing, acting and musical theater.

MacLaine made her film debut in Alfred Hitchcock’s The Trouble with Harry (1955), for which she won the Golden Globe Award for New Star of the Year – Actress. This was quickly followed by her role in the Martin and Lewis film Artists and Models (also 1955).

Soon afterwards, she had a role in Around the World in 80 Days (1956). This was followed by Hot Spell and a leading role in Some Came Running (both 1958); for the latter film she gained her first Academy Award nomination and a Golden Globe nomination.

Her second Oscar nomination came two years later for The Apartment (1960), starring with Jack Lemmon.

The film won five Oscars, including Best Director for Billy Wilder. She later said, “I thought I would win for The Apartment, but then Elizabeth Taylor had a tracheotomy.” She starred in The Children’s Hour (1961) also starring Audrey Hepburn and James Garner, based on the play by Lillian Hellman and directed by William Wyler.

She was again nominated, this time for Irma la Douce (1963), which reunited her with Wilder and Lemmon. Don Siegel, her director on Two Mules for Sister Sara (1970) said of her: “It’s hard to feel any great warmth to her. She’s too unfeminine and has too much balls. She’s very, very hard.”

At the peak of her success, she replaced Marilyn Monroe in Irma la Douce and What a Way to Go! (1964). Other films from this period include Gambit (1966), with Michael Caine, and the film version of the musical Sweet Charity (1968), based on the script for Fellini’s Nights of Cabiria released a decade earlier.

 

MacLaine’s documentary film The Other Half of the Sky: A China Memoir (1975), co-directed with Claudia Weill, concentrates on the experiences of women in China. It was nominated for the year’s Documentary Feature Oscar.

Co-starring with Anne Bancroft in The Turning Point (1977), MacLaine portrayed a retired ballerina much like herself; she was nominated for an Oscar as the Best Actress in a Leading Role. In 1978, she was awarded the Women in FilmCrystal Award for outstanding women who, through their endurance and the excellence of their work, have helped to expand the role of women within the entertainment industry.

In Being There (1979), she appeared with Peter Sellers. In a short-lived MacLaine television sitcom, Shirley’s World (1971–72), co-produced by Sheldon Leonard and ITC and shot in the United Kingdom, she was cast as a photojournalist.

Shirley Mac Laine3

MacLaine has also appeared in numerous television projects including an autobiographical miniseries based upon the book Out on a Limb;

The Salem Witch Trials;

These Old Broads written by Carrie Fisher and co-starring Elizabeth Taylor, Debbie Reynolds, and Joan Collins;

Coco, a Lifetime production based on the life of Coco Chanel.

She appeared in the third and fourth seasons of the British drama Downton Abbey as Martha Levinson, mother to Cora, Countess of Grantham (played by Elizabeth McGovern) and Harold Levinson (played by Paul Giamatti) in 2012–2013.

In February 2016, it was announced that MacLaine will star in the live-action family film A Little Mermaid, based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairytale, to be produced by MVP Studios.[16]

 

MacLaine was married to businessman Steve Parker from 1954 until their divorce in 1982; they have a daughter, Sachi.

In April 2011, while promoting her new book, I’m Over All That, she revealed to Oprah Winfrey that she had had an open relationship with her husband.

MacLaine also told Winfrey that she often fell for the leading men she worked with, with the exceptions of Jack Lemmon (The Apartment) and Jack Nicholson (Terms of Endearment).

MacLaine has also gotten into feuds with such notable co-stars as Anthony Hopkins (A Change of Seasons), who said that “she was the most obnoxious actress I have ever worked with,” and Debra Winger (Terms of Endearment).

MacLaine has claimed that, in a previous life in Atlantis, she was the brother to a 35,000-year-old spirit named Ramtha channeled by American mystic teacher and author J. Z. Knight.

She has a strong interest in spirituality and metaphysics, the central theme of some of her best-selling books including Out on a Limb and Dancing in the Light. She has undertaken such forms of spiritual exploration as walking the Way of St. James, working with Chris Griscom and practicing Transcendental Meditation.

Her well-known interest in New Age spirituality has also made its way into several of her films. In Albert Brooks’s romantic comedy Defending Your Life (1991), the recently deceased lead characters, played by Brooks and Meryl Streep, are astonished to find MacLaine introducing their past lives in the “Past Lives Pavilion”.

In Postcards from the Edge (1990), MacLaine sings a version of “I’m Still Here”, with customized lyrics created for her by composer Stephen Sondheim. One of the lyrics was changed to “I’m feeling transcendental – am I here?” In the television movie These Old Broads, MacLaine’s character is a devotee of New Age spirituality.

She has an interest in UFOs, and gave numerous interviews on CNN, NBC and Fox news channels on the subject during 2007–8. In her book Sage-ing While Age-ing (2007), she described alien encounters and witnessing a Washington, D.C. UFO incident in the 1950s.In the April 2011 edition of the Oprah show MacLaine stated that she and her neighbor observed numerous UFO incidents at her New Mexico ranch for extended periods of time.

MacLaine is godmother to the daughter of former Democratic U.S. Representative Dennis Kucinich.

Along with her brother, Warren Beatty, MacLaine used her celebrity status in instrumental roles as a fundraiser and organizer for George McGovern’s campaign for president in 1972.That year, she authored the book McGovern: The Man and His Beliefs.

On February 7, 2013, Penguin Group USA published Sachi Parker’s autobiography Lucky Me: My Life With – and Without – My Mom, Shirley MacLaine.[36]MacLaine has called the book “virtually all fiction”.

MacLaine starred in A Change of Seasons (1980) alongside Anthony Hopkins, and won the Best Actress in a Leading Role Oscar for Terms of Endearment (1983), playing Debra Winger’s mother. She won a Golden Globe for Best Actress (Drama) for Madame Sousatzka (1988).

She has continued to star in major films, such as Steel Magnolias with Sally Field, Julia Roberts and other stars. In 2000 she made her feature-film directorial debut and starred in Bruno, which was released to video as The Dress Code. MacLaine has starred in Postcards from the Edge (1990) with Meryl Streep, playing a fictionalized version of Debbie Reynolds from a screenplay by Reynolds’s daughter, Carrie Fisher; Used People (1992) with Jessica Tandy and Kathy Bates; Guarding Tess (1994) with Nicolas Cage; Mrs. Winterbourne (1996), with Ricki Lake and Brendan Fraser; Rumor Has It… (2005) with Kevin Costner and Jennifer Aniston; In Her Shoes (also 2005) with Cameron Diaz and Toni Collette; and Closing the Ring (2007) directed by Richard Attenborough and starring Christopher Plummer.

 

Source Wikipedia

Videos : Youtube

 

Also you can read

https://radiosatellite.co/2017/03/05/jerry-lewis/

 

 

THEY LOOK LIKE…


Anonymous people who look like artists. Here are some amazing photos . Hoping that they will please you.  Some of them are already stars in their own countries because of their “look”

 

Brazilian Dany De Vito

Brazilian Dany De Vito

Brazilian Dany De Vito

 

Turkish George Clooney

Turkish George Clooney

Turkish George Clooney

 

 

Mexican Morgan Freeman

MEXICAN MORGAN FREEMAN

MEXICAN MORGAN FREEMAN

 

 

Russian Hugh Laurie (Dr House)

Russian Hugh Laurie Dr House

Russian Hugh Laurie Dr House

 

 

Asian Brad Pitt

asian brad pitt

asian brad pitt

 

Asian Morgan Freeman

asian brad pitt

asian brad pitt

 

 

Chinese Vladimir Putin ( Poutine)

chinese vladimir Poutine

chinese vladimir Poutine

 

 

Indian Bradley Cooper

indian bradley cooper

indian bradley cooper

 

 

Indian Clark Gable

indian clark gable

indian clark gable

 

 

Indonesian Obama

indonesian Barak Obama

indonesian Barak Obama

 

 

Mexican Obama

mexican obama

mexican obama

 

Japanese Bruce Willis

japanese bruce willis

japanese bruce willis

 

Peruvian Morgan Freeman

peruvian morgan freeman

peruvian morgan freeman

 

Russian Jim Carrey

Russian Jim Carrey

Russian Jim Carrey

 

Vietnamese George W Bush

Vietnamese George W Bush

Vietnamese George W Bush

SOURCES : BORED PANDA   https://boredpanda.com/foreign-celebrity-lookalikes