Records and recording


LONDON — Tucked in a trendy co-working complex in West London, just past the food court and the payment processing start-up, is perhaps the most technologically backward-looking record company in the world.

 

LONDON — Tucked in a trendy co-working complex in West London, just past the food court and the payment processing start-up, is perhaps the most technologically backward-looking record company in the world.

 

The Electric Recording Co., which has been releasing music since 2012, specializes in meticulous recreations of classical and jazz albums from the 1950s and ’60s. Its catalog includes reissues of landmark recordings by Wilhelm Furtwängler, John Coltrane and Thelonious Monk, as well as lesser-known artists favored by collectors, like the violinist Johanna Martzy.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

But what really sets Electric Recording apart is its method — a philosophy of production more akin to the making of small-batch gourmet chocolate than most shrink-wrapped vinyl.

 

Its albums, assembled by hand and released in editions of 300 or fewer — at a cost of $400 to $600 for each LP — are made with restored vintage equipment down to glowing vacuum-tube amplifiers, and mono tape systems that have not been used in more than half a century.

The goal is to ensure a faithful restoration of what the label’s founder, Pete Hutchison, sees as a lost golden age of record-making. Even its record jackets, printed one by one on letterpress machines, show a fanatical devotion to age-old craft.

“It started as wanting to recreate the original but not make it a sort of pastiche,” Hutchison said in a recent interview. “And in order not to create a pastiche, we had to do everything as they had done it.”

 

Electric Recording’s attention to detail, and Hutchison’s delicate engineering style in mastering old records, have given the label a revered status among collectors — yet also drawn subtle ridicule among rivals who view its approach as needlessly expensive and too precious by half.

 

An original Lyrec T818 tape machine that the label has painstakingly renovated, in its London studio.Credit…Tom Jamieson for The New York Times

original Lyrec T818 tape machine

original Lyrec T818 tape machine

 

Hutchison, 53, whose sharp features and foot-long beard make him look like a wayward wizard from “The Lord of the Rings,” dismissed such critiques as examples of the audiophile world’s catty tribalism. Even the word “audiophile,” he feels, is more often an empty marketing gimmick than a reliable sign of quality.
“Audiophiles listen with their ears, not with their hearts,” Hutchison said. He added: “That’s not our game, really.”

So what’s his game?

“The game is trying to do something that is anti-generic, if you like,” he said. “What we’re doing with these old records is essentially taking the technology from the time and remaking it as it was done then, rather than compromising it.”

To a large degree, the vinyl resurgence of the last decade has been fueled by reissues. But no reissue label has gone to the same extremes as Electric Recording.

In 2009, Hutchison bought the two hulking, gunmetal-gray machines he uses to master records — a Lyrec tape deck and lathe, with Ortofon amplifiers, both from 1965 — and spent more than $150,000 restoring them over three years. He has invested thousands more on improvements like replacing their copper wiring with mined silver, which Hutchison said gives the audio signal a greater level of purity.

The machines allow Hutchison to exclude any trace of technology that has crept into the recording process since a time when the Beatles were in moptops. That means not only anything digital or computerized, but also transistors, a mainstay of audio circuitry for decades; instead, the machines’ amplifiers are powered by vacuum tubes (or valves, as British engineers call them).

 

“We’re all about valves here,” Hutchison said on a tour of the label’s studio.

Mastering a vinyl record involves “cutting” grooves into a lacquer disc, a dark art in which tiny adjustments can have a big effect. Unusually among engineers, Hutchison tends to master records at low volumes — sometimes even quieter than the originals — to bring out more of the natural feel of the instruments.
He demonstrated his technique during a recent mastering session for “Mal/2,” a 1957 album by the jazz pianist Mal Waldron that features an appearance by Coltrane. He tested several mastering levels for the song “One by One” — which has lots of staccato trumpet notes, played by Idrees Sulieman — before settling on one that preserved the excitement of the original tape but avoided what Hutchison called a “honk” when the horns reached a climax.

“What you want to hear is the clarity, the harmonics, the textures,” he said. “What you don’t want is to put it on and feel like you’ve got to turn it down.”

These judgments are often subjective. But to test Hutchison’s approach, I visited the New Jersey home of Michael Fremer, a contributing editor at Stereophile and a longtime champion of vinyl. We listened to a handful of Electric Recording releases, comparing them to pressings of the same material by other companies, on Fremer’s state-of-the-art test system (the speakers alone cost $100,000).
Hutchison bought the two hulking, gunmetal-gray machines he uses to master records — both from 1965 — and spent more than $150,000 restoring them over three years.Credit…Tom Jamieson for The New York Times

 

vinyl 3

 

I am often skeptical of claims of vinyl’s superiority, but when listening to one of Electric Recording’s albums of Bach’s solo violin pieces played by Martzy, I was stunned by their clearness and beauty. Compared to the other pressings, Electric Recording’s version had vivid, visceral details, yielding a persuasive illusion of a human being standing before me drawing a bow across a violin.
“It’s magical what they’re doing, recreating these old records,” Fremer said as he swapped out more Electric Recording discs.

Hutchison is a surprising candidate to carry the torch for sepia-toned classical fidelity. In the 1990s, he was a player in the British techno scene with his label Peacefrog; the label’s success in the early 2000s with the minimalist folk of José González helped finance the obsession that became Electric Recording.

Hutchison’s conversion happened after he inherited the classical records owned by his father, who died in 1998. A longtime collector of rock and jazz, Hutchison was entranced by the sound of the decades-old originals, and found newer reissues unsatisfying. He learned that Peacefrog’s distributor, EMI, owned the rights to many of his new favorites. Was it possible to recreate things exactly has they had been done the first time around?

After restoring the machines, Electric Recording put its first three albums on sale in late 2012 — Martzy’s solo Bach sets, originally issued in the mid-1950s.

Hutchison decided that true fidelity applied to packaging as well as recording. Letterpress printing drove up his manufacturing costs, and some of the label’s projects have seemed to push the boundaries of absurdity.

In making “Mozart à Paris,” for example, a near-perfect simulacrum of a deluxe 1956 box set, Hutchison spent months scouring London’s haberdashers to find the right strand of silk for a decorative cord. The seven-disc set is Electric Recording’s most expensive title, at about $3,400 — and one of the few in its catalog that has not sold out.

Hutchison defends such efforts as part of the label’s devotion to authenticity. But it comes at a cost. Its manufacturing methods, and the quality-control attention paid to each record, bring no economies of scale. So Electric Recording would gain no reduction in expenses if it made more, thus negating the question Hutchison is most frequently asked: Why not press more records and sell them more cheaply?

“We probably make the most expensive records in the world,” Hutchison said, “and make the least profit.”

Electric Recording’s prices have drawn head-scratching through the cliquey world of high-end vinyl producers. Chad Kassem, whose company Acoustic Sounds, in Salina, Kan., is one of the world’s biggest vinyl empires, said he admired Hutchison’s work.

“I tip my hat to any company that goes the extra mile to make things as best as possible,” Kassem said.

But he said he was proud of Acoustic Sounds’s work, which like Electric Recording cuts its masters from original tapes and goes to great lengths to capture original design details — and sells most of its records for about $35. I asked Kassem what is the difference between a $35 reissue and a $500 one.
He paused for a moment, then said: “Four hundred sixty-five dollars.”

Yet the market has embraced Electric Recording. Even amid the coronavirus pandemic, Hutchison said, its records have been selling as fast as ever, although the company has had some production hiccups. The only manufacturer of a fabric that Hutchison chose for a Mozart set in the works, by the pianist Lili Kraus, has been locked down in Italy.

The next frontier for Electric Recording is rock. Hutchison recently got permission to reissue “Forever Changes,” the classic 1967 psychedelic album by the California band Love, and said that the original tape had a more unvarnished sound than most fans had heard. He expects that to be released in July, and “Mal/2” is due in August.

But Hutchison seemed most proud of the label’s work on classical records that seemed to come from a distant era. He pulled out a 10-inch mini-album of Bach by the French pianist Yvonne Lefébure, originally released in 1955. Electric Recording painstakingly recreated its dowel spine, its cotton sleeve, its leather cover embossed in gold leaf.

“It’s a nice artifact,” Hutchison said, looking at it lovingly. “It’s a great record as well.”

 

Source : The New York Times

 

 

 

KIRK DOUGLAS


Notre équipe a souhaité écrire un article commun sur Messieurs  KIRK et MICHAEL DOUGLAS : Le projet était en cours.

Cependant, le décès de M kirk DOUGLAS le 05 février 2020 a fait en sorte que nous ressortions  l’article déjà écrit sur un autre de nos sites RADIOSATELLITE  pour le diffuser sur le site officiel et principal de notre Radio “en ligne”.

KIRK DOUGLAS

Issur Danielovitch dit Kirk Douglas, né le 9 décembre 1916 à Amsterdam (État de New York), est un acteur, producteur, réalisateur et écrivain américain. Il est le père de l’acteur et producteur Michael Douglas.

 

KIRK DOUGLAS

 

 

Figure majeure du cinéma américain, Kirk Douglas est un des acteurs les plus populaires dans le monde entier dans les années 1950 et 1960.

Nombre de ses films deviennent des classiques, et il excelle dans tous les genres : la comédie (Au fil de l’épée), l’aventure (Vingt Mille Lieues sous les mers, Les Vikings), le western (Règlement de comptes à O.K. Corral), le péplum (Spartacus), les films de guerre (Les Héros de Télémark, Sept jours en mai, Les Sentiers de la gloire), le drame (La Vie passionnée de Vincent van Gogh).

Douglas a tourné avec de nombreux réalisateurs réputés comme Brian De Palma, Stanley Kubrick, Vincente Minnelli, John Huston, Howard Hawks, Otto Preminger, Joseph Leo Mankiewicz, Elia Kazan, Billy Wilder et King Vidor.

Connu pour son engagement démocrate, il est un producteur courageux à une époque où le cinéma américain est en proie au maccarthysme, notamment en engageant Dalton Trumbo, le scénariste figurant sur la « liste noire d’Hollywood ». Plusieurs de ses films abordent des thèmes sensibles, comme la Première Guerre mondiale avec Les Sentiers de la gloire (Paths of Glory), qui est interdit à sa sortie dans beaucoup de pays européens. Dans le western avec La Captive aux yeux clairs, La Rivière de nos amours et Le Dernier Train de Gun Hill, il tourne des films qui réhabilitent la figure de l’Indien et dénoncent le racisme.

KIRK DOUGLAS1

 

Ambitieux, séducteur , mégalomane , il fait partie des acteurs américains qui ont le plus marqué la mémoire du public.

Sa grande popularité ne s’est jamais démentie et il apparaît comme l’une des dernières légendes de l’Âge d’or de Hollywood. L’American Film Institute l’a par ailleurs classé en 1999 17e plus grande star masculine du cinéma américain de tous les temps.

Retiré du cinéma en 2008, il s’occupe de sa fondation pour les enfants défavorisés.

Issur Danielovitch est le quatrième enfant d’une famille qui en compte sept (il a six sœurs).

Il est le fils de Bryna (« Bertha », née Sanglel) et de Herschel (« Harry ») Danielovitch (« Demsky »). Ses parents étaient des immigrants juifs de Tchavoussy, en actuelle Biélorussie, ayant fui le pays pour échapper à la pauvreté et à l’antisémitisme d’état de l’Empire russe.

Son oncle paternel, qui avait émigré auparavant, avait utilisé le patronyme de « Demsky », que la famille Danielovitch adoptera aux États-Unis. En plus de leur nom de famille, ses parents changèrent leurs prénoms en Harry et Bertha. Issur adopte quant à lui le surnom d’« Izzy » : né sous le nom d’Issur Danielovitch, il grandit donc sous celui de Izzy Demsky

 

 

Le père est chiffonnier et la famille vit modestement au 46 Eagle Street à Amsterdam, dans l’État de New York. C’est après avoir récité un poème à l’école et reçu des applaudissements que le jeune Issur décide de devenir acteur. Une ambition non partagée par sa famille. À l’université, le fait d’être fils de chiffonnier lui attire l’ostracisme des personnes intolérantes mais le jeune homme trouve une façon d’imposer le respect : la lutte.

En juin 1939, il décide de partir à New York pour apprendre la comédie. Au théâtre Tamarak, un ami lui propose de changer son nom. On lui propose Kirk et un nom commençant par un D, Douglas. Il entre ensuite à l’académie américaine d’art dramatique et suit les cours de Charles Jehlinger.

Il y rencontre aussi Diana Dill, sa future première femme, et la jeune Betty Bacall, future Lauren Bacall. Après quelques rôles mineurs dans les pièces Spring Again (novembre 1941) et Les Trois Sœurs (décembre 1942), il s’engage dans la marine. Peu avant de s’enrôler, il effectue une démarche de changement de nom : Kirk Douglas, qui était initialement un nom de scène, devient alors son nom d’état civil.

Pendant la guerre, il se marie à Diana. Réformé à la suite d’une dysenterie chronique au printemps 1943, il retourne à New York puis de mars 1943 à juin 1945 il remplace sur scène Richard Widmark dans Kiss and Tell et en avril 1946 il joue dans Woman bites dog. Lauren Bacall, en intervenant auprès de Hal Wallis, lui permet d’obtenir le troisième rôle dans L’Emprise du crime où il joue le mari de Barbara Stanwycknote .

Il donne la réplique à Robert Mitchum dans La Griffe du passé et rencontre Burt Lancaster dans L’Homme aux abois. Alors qu’il est père de deux enfants et qu’il se sépare de sa femme, il prend le choix audacieux de tourner Le Champion (alors qu’on lui proposait une superproduction produite par la MGM). Sorti en juillet 1949, le film est un succès inespéré.

Kirk Douglas signe alors un contrat avec la Warner et enchaîne plusieurs films (La Femme aux chimères, Le Gouffre aux chimères…) qui lui permettent de rencontrer et de séduire un grand nombre de stars féminines, dont Rita Hayworth ou Gene Tierney. Las de l’emprise du studio, il décide de ne pas renouveler son contrat après le film La Vallée des géants. Libre, il tourne un western de Howard Hawks, La Captive aux yeux clairs, puis Les Ensorcelés de Vincente Minnelli où l’oscar du meilleur acteur lui échappe.

Pour les beaux yeux de l’actrice italienne Pier Angeli il accepte un contrat de trois films qui l’amène en Europe. Le Jongleur, Un acte d’amour et enfin Ulysse des jeunes producteurs Dino De Laurentiis et Carlo Ponti.

À cette époque il rencontre Anne Buydens, une assistante dont il tombe amoureux et qu’il épouse le 29 mai 1954, la même année que la superproduction Disney Vingt Mille Lieues sous les mers. Après L’Homme qui n’a pas d’étoile, l’acteur à succès devient producteur et crée la Bryna, du nom de sa mère, et produit La Rivière de nos amours, un succès.

En 1955 il achète les droits du roman Lust for life et confie la réalisation à Vincente Minnelli. La Vie passionnée de Vincent van Gogh entraîne Kirk Douglas aux limites de la schizophrénie, l’acteur ayant du mal à entrer sans conséquences dans l’âme tourmentée du peintre.

Là encore, il est nommé pour l’Oscar du meilleur acteur sans toutefois l’obtenir. Il tourne alors avec son ami Burt Lancaster un western de légende, Règlement de comptes à O.K. Corral. Sa composition du personnage de Doc Holliday reste dans toutes les mémoires. La même année, il s’investit dans la production et l’écriture d’un autre film de légende, Les Sentiers de la gloire qui permet à Stanley Kubrick de faire ses preuves.

Le film ne rapporta pas beaucoup d’argent puisqu’interdit dans un grand nombre de pays européens. Avec la Bryna, il produit Les Vikings, fresque épique qui l’emmène tourner un peu partout dans le monde (dont en France). Le film avec Tony Curtis et Janet Leigh est un gros succès. L’année suivante, après le film Au fil de l’épée, sa mère meurt le jour de son anniversaire.

Vexé de ne pas avoir été choisi pour interpréter Ben-Hur, il choisit de faire son propre film épique en adaptant au cinéma l’histoire de Spartacus l’esclave qui fit trembler Rome.

KIRK DOUGLAS SPARTACUS

KIRK DOUGLAS

 

Une préparation longue et compliquée, un tournage long et difficile (le réalisateur Anthony Mann est remplacé par Stanley Kubrick), mais un immense succès et un rôle qui place définitivement Kirk Douglas au panthéon des stars de Hollywood.

En 1962, toujours sur un scénario de Dalton Trumbo, il interprète un cow-boy perdu dans le monde moderne dans Seuls sont les indomptés, son film préféré de toute sa carrière cinématographique. Il triomphe aussi au théâtre dans la pièce Vol au-dessus d’un nid de coucou, qu’il comptait jouer au cinéma. Après quelques échecs commerciaux, dont un ambitieux, Le Dernier de la liste, il revient aux films engagés avec Sept jours en mai. Dans Les Héros de Télémark il est un scientifique qui tente de stopper la progression industrielle allemande pendant la guerre. Sur la même période, il enchaîne avec Première victoire et L’Ombre d’un géant.

Après un petit rôle dans Paris brûle-t-il ? de René Clément, il retrouve John Wayne pour un western à succès La Caravane de feu.

En 1969, il tourne L’Arrangement sous la direction de Elia Kazan puis sous celle de Joseph L. Mankiewicz pour un western original et déroutant, Le Reptile aux côtés de Henry Fonda. Après une autre adaptation d’un roman de Jules Verne (assez sombre), Le Phare du bout du monde, Kirk Douglas décide de passer à la réalisation.

Sur un sujet qu’il pense rentable, avec un budget correct, Kirk Douglas réalise Scalawag, adapté de L’Île au trésor. Le tournage est catastrophique, comme en témoigne le journal de bord, et le film est un échec total. Deux ans plus tard, il réitère l’opération avec La Brigade du Texas, western qui ne trouve pas son public.

Ce dernier film incite la star à abandonner la réalisation. Ne voulant plus tourner que des films qui l’intéressent, il produit Holocauste 2000, et Saturn  (nommé aux Razzie Awards). Furie lui permet de se frotter au Nouvel Hollywood avec Brian De Palma et Nimitz, retour vers l’enfer de retrouver le film de guerre, mâtiné cette fois de science-fiction.

Il retrouve son ami Burt Lancaster pour Coup double en 1986. Victime d’un grave accident d’hélicoptère en Californie duquel il réchappe miraculeusement, il réduit son activité cinématographique, freinée par une attaque cérébrale en 1996. Diamonds en 1999 est l’occasion de retrouver Lauren Bacall et de recevoir au festival de Deauville un hommage pour l’ensemble de sa carrière.

Une attaque cardiaque en 2001 lui enlève tout espoir de retourner au cinéma, et pourtant il accepte de tourner dans Une si belle famille aux côtés de son fils Michael et de son petit-fils Cameron. Trois générations de Douglas sont ainsi réunies pour un film sorti de façon discrète et qui ne connaîtra pas un grand succès.

Depuis le milieu des années 1990, Kirk Douglas est fréquemment honoré dans le monde entier pour l’ensemble de sa carrière. Écrivain, il a publié plusieurs ouvrages et se consacre aujourd’hui à sa fondation en faveur des enfants défavorisés.

Kirk Douglas s’est marié deux fois : la première fois avec Diana Dill (née le 22 janvier 1923, divorcée en 1951 et morte le 3 juillet 2015) avec qui il a eu deux fils, l’acteur Michael Douglas et Joel Douglas ; la seconde fois en 1954 avec Anne Buydens (née le 23 avril 1919), avec qui il a eu également deux fils, le producteur Peter Vincent Douglas, né le 23 novembre 1955, et l’acteur Eric Douglas, né le 21 juin 1958 et mort le 6 juillet 2004 d’une overdose.

Il a sept petits-enfants (trois enfants de Michael Douglas, dont l’aîné Cameron Douglas est également acteur, et quatre enfants de Peter Douglas).

Considéré comme bel homme, Kirk Douglas est souvent identifié par sa fossette au menton. Il a été caricaturé avec cette fossette bien visible sous le nom de Spartakis dans la série de bandes dessinées #Astérix (album La Galère d’Obélix), d’après son rôle dans le film #Spartacus.

 

kirk Douglas est décédé le 05 Février 2020.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Kirk Douglas Album

 

https://webradiosatellite2.blogspot.com/2017/12/kirk-douglas.html

What Each Character Of ‘Friends’ Would Earn In 2019 Betches — AllAbout


There are few things in life considered timeless, among them are The Beatles, red lipstick, and, of course, Friends. Seriously, that show kept me alive during my junior semester abroad in a city that’s tied for least things to do and worst food. If you’re ever in Spain, be sure to not visit to Salamanca.…

 

via What Each Character Of ‘Friends’ Would Earn In 2019 Betches — AllAbout

 

STATS FOR FEBRUARY 2019


 

As we do ( from time to time ) we communicate to our readers and listeners,  the last stats of our 2 webradios ( Internet radio Stations)

For February, we have just received the stats concerning “RadioSatellite” for February 2019

Images show us , listeners by country. ( Number of listeners )

 

Everyone of you will find his / her country on the list (hope that we have listeners in your country )

 

Comme nous le faisons, de temps en temps, nous vous communiquons les chiffres des stats concernant nos webradios ( Radio en ligne sur internet )

Cette fois, ci, nous communiquons les chiffres de “RadioSatellite”

Les chiffres indiquent le nombre d’auditeurs / d’auditrices par pays.

 

Chacune / chacun d’entre vous, chers lecteurs, auditeurs, pourra retrouver son pays sur la liste ( En espérant que nous avons des auditeurs dans votre pays)

 

 

1top20

 

2TOP 21 A 40

 

3TOP 41 A 60

4TOP 61 A 85

5TOP 86 A 110

6TOP 111 A 130

7TOP 131 A 151

 

 

Mostly Folk Episode 335


Mostly Folk

 

Daily on Radio Satellite2  at 09h00PM EST (USA).

Mostly folk is a program proposed, produced and presented by ARTIE MARTELLO

http://www.mostlyfolk.org

Also on Radio’s Satellite2 Apps for your smartphones / tablets :

Apple : https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/radio-satellite2/id975597379?mt=8

Android : https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.nobexinc.wls_80172696.rc

BlackBerry : https://appworld.blackberry.com/webstore/content/59955997/?countrycode=FR&lang=en

Here is episode 335 : Enjoy

 

Buddy Valastro Jr the “cake Boss”


Bartolo “Buddy” Valastro Jr. (born March 3, 1977) is an American celebrity chef, entrepreneur, and reality television personality of Italian heritage. He is the owner of Carlo’s Bakery, as well as the face of Buddy V’s Ristorante.

He is perhaps best known as the star of the reality television series Cake Boss, which premiered in April 2009. He has also starred in Kitchen Boss (2011), The Next Great Baker (2010), and Buddy’s Bakery Rescue (2013).

Surprisingly, Buddy Valastro did a cameo in the hit movie Bridesmaids, where he baked one cupcake in the kitchen baking scene only showing his hands.

 

cake boss photo by NY DAILY NEWS

(credit Photo: NY DAILY NEWS)

Valastro is the owner and head baker of Carlo’s Bakery—the bakery featured on Cake Boss. Carlo’s has since opened 17 more bakeries due to the popularity of the show. In January 2012, as a result of the attention that the shop and the TV series had brought to the city of Hoboken, the Hudson Reporter named #Valastro as an honorable mention in its list of Hudson County’s 50 most influential people.

Carlo’s Bakery currently has 7 locations in New Jersey—Hoboken, Marlton, Morristown, Red Bank, Ridgewood, Wayne, and Westfield. Outside of New Jersey, the bakery operates locations in Philadelphia, PA; Bethlehem, PA; Westbury and New York, NY; Orlando, FL; Frisco, Dallas, and The Woodlands, TX; Sao Paulo, Brazil; Uncasville, CT; Las Vegas and most recently in Minneapolis, The Lackawanna Factory in nearby Jersey City, serves as the corporate office for the business and is used as additional space to create wedding and specialty cakes, as well as bake their specialty baked goods for shipment across the country. Valastro launched an Event Planning & Catering company, Buddy V’s Events. The company was launched in June 2014, and specializes in catering everything from corporate events to family gathers, as well as planning events such as weddings and galas.

 

In 2016 Valastro partnered with Whole Earth Sweetener Co. on a campaign to “Rethink Sweet.” “Buddy will serve as the official brand ambassador for the new line of zero- and lower-calorie sweeteners, and will work to help his fans make healthy lifestyle choices, without compromising on taste. Buddy will share his culinary expertise, along with all-new, original and seasonally festive recipes for mouthwatering treats using Whole Earth Sweetener Co. products.”

Sources : Wikipedia / Youtube

Photo : NY Daily News.