Zade Dirani


 

ZADE DIRANI : A great artist. To discover

Described as a “Piano Prodigy” by People Magazine, and a “Gorgeous Pianist/Composer/Hunk”, by the Washington Post, pianist, composer, and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador ; Zade Dirani has released Billboard charting albums, and has performed in concert before tens of thousands around the world including world leaders such as King Abdullah and Queen Rania of Jordan, Queen Elizabeth of England and Prince Philip Duke of Edinburgh, Queen Noor of Jordan, the Late Nelson Mandela, former US first lady Laura Bush, former Qatar first lady Sheika Moza Bint Nasser, Princess Lalla Hasna of Morocco, Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, and US statesman Colin Powell among others.

zade

Zade has performed in concerts in Jordan, Lebanon, Egypt, Morocco, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Kuwait, England, France, Spain, and the United States.

ZAD DIRANI ONE NIGHT IN JORDAN

Zade’s latest album which will be released in 2019, is entitled “Un Piano Y Amigos” and is the fruition of collaboration with Spanish hit producer David Santisteban who produced the album.

The album features vocal guest appearances with some of the most prominent artists on the Spanish music landscape today, including India Martinez, Pitingo, David DeMaria, Sweet California, Soraya, Ana Mena, Eva Ruiz, Lorena Gomez, Paula Rojo, and Lerica.

Born in Amman, and later relocated to the United States, Zade started writing music for piano and orchestra at age fifteen, and saw his first concert of his own compositions come to life at the age of nineteen.

zad dirani last night in orient - Copie

He has been featured on CNN, Fox News, The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, The Washington Times, The Houston Chronicles, The Associated Press, Reuters, Skye News, Al Jazeera, MBC, Al Arabiyah, among others, and was mentored in Los Angeles by Grammy winning producer David Foster.

Distinctive concert appearances include performances at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC, a performance at the UNESCO’s Headquarters in Paris, a performance at the World Economic Forum, and a performance at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC.

In 2006, Zade launched “The Zade Foundation” a nonprofit organization that offers educational scholarships to young musicians from different parts of the world. The foundation’s flagship program “The Roads to You Tour” brought together 35 musicians from 20 different countries, including war torn regions.

To date, the musicians presented more than 300 workshops and performances in various cities in the United States in an effort to bring world cultures closer together through music.

In 2008, Zade performed an epic concert entitled: “One Night in Jordan: A Concert for Peace” where he brought together 100 musicians from around the world, including the London Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and the London Voices Choir. The concert was presented in a historical setting and filmed in HD at one of the world’s largest remaining Roman Amphitheatres built nearly 2,000 years ago. The concert event was attended by more than 10,000 people and was broadcast in numerous countries around the world including the United States on Public Television.

zade dirani - Copie

The “One Night in Jordan” CD debuted on the US Billboard at #2 on the New Age Chart, #5 on the Classical Crossover Chart, and #11 on the Overall Classical Chart.  Zade’s accompanying DVD also debuted on Billboard’s Top DVD/Music Video Charts at #18.

In 2016, Zade was appointed UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador for Middle East and North Africa and his appointment was launched with a piano performance at Al Zaatari Refugee camp in Jordan where he invited refugee children to improvise on the piano with him.

 

VIDEO: Click to show :

 

This performance would later inspire the permanent music therapy program in the camps that he would launch with UNICEF two years later.

In 2017, Zade recorded “Heartbeat” with by 10 year-old Ansam, an internally displaced girl in Syria who was born blind. The song was shot in an area of Syria heavily damaged by the fighting. Children performing as part of the choir are all internally displaced and participate, along with Ansam, in UNICEF psychosocial support programmes. The song was utilized to raise awareness to the war in Syria as the conflict reached six years and was shared worldwide on social media by other UNICEF Goodwill Ambassadors including Ricky Martin, Orlando Bloom, and Lionel Messi.

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In 2018, With UNICEF, he launched the first music therapy program in the world designed specifically for children in refugee camps with pilot programs at Al Zaatari Refugee camp and Al Azraq Refugee camp in Jordan.

Zade studied piano at Noor Al Hussein’s National Music Conservatory in Amman, founded by Queen Noor of Jordan and later at Berklee College of Music in Boston.

Queen Noor said: “Zade is a musician of outstanding ability, whose creations have delighted
 the people of our nation and our region on both private and public occasions. Zade’s enthusiasm, which I first experienced almost 20 years ago in his early days at the Noor Al Hussein Foundation’s National Music Conservatory in Jordan, is as unbridled as ever.”

Zade resides in Barcelona and Amman.

 

zade2 - Copie

 

Sources : Zade’swebsite:  zade.com

Records and recording


LONDON — Tucked in a trendy co-working complex in West London, just past the food court and the payment processing start-up, is perhaps the most technologically backward-looking record company in the world.

 

LONDON — Tucked in a trendy co-working complex in West London, just past the food court and the payment processing start-up, is perhaps the most technologically backward-looking record company in the world.

 

The Electric Recording Co., which has been releasing music since 2012, specializes in meticulous recreations of classical and jazz albums from the 1950s and ’60s. Its catalog includes reissues of landmark recordings by Wilhelm Furtwängler, John Coltrane and Thelonious Monk, as well as lesser-known artists favored by collectors, like the violinist Johanna Martzy.

 

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But what really sets Electric Recording apart is its method — a philosophy of production more akin to the making of small-batch gourmet chocolate than most shrink-wrapped vinyl.

 

Its albums, assembled by hand and released in editions of 300 or fewer — at a cost of $400 to $600 for each LP — are made with restored vintage equipment down to glowing vacuum-tube amplifiers, and mono tape systems that have not been used in more than half a century.

The goal is to ensure a faithful restoration of what the label’s founder, Pete Hutchison, sees as a lost golden age of record-making. Even its record jackets, printed one by one on letterpress machines, show a fanatical devotion to age-old craft.

“It started as wanting to recreate the original but not make it a sort of pastiche,” Hutchison said in a recent interview. “And in order not to create a pastiche, we had to do everything as they had done it.”

 

Electric Recording’s attention to detail, and Hutchison’s delicate engineering style in mastering old records, have given the label a revered status among collectors — yet also drawn subtle ridicule among rivals who view its approach as needlessly expensive and too precious by half.

 

An original Lyrec T818 tape machine that the label has painstakingly renovated, in its London studio.Credit…Tom Jamieson for The New York Times

original Lyrec T818 tape machine

original Lyrec T818 tape machine

 

Hutchison, 53, whose sharp features and foot-long beard make him look like a wayward wizard from “The Lord of the Rings,” dismissed such critiques as examples of the audiophile world’s catty tribalism. Even the word “audiophile,” he feels, is more often an empty marketing gimmick than a reliable sign of quality.
“Audiophiles listen with their ears, not with their hearts,” Hutchison said. He added: “That’s not our game, really.”

So what’s his game?

“The game is trying to do something that is anti-generic, if you like,” he said. “What we’re doing with these old records is essentially taking the technology from the time and remaking it as it was done then, rather than compromising it.”

To a large degree, the vinyl resurgence of the last decade has been fueled by reissues. But no reissue label has gone to the same extremes as Electric Recording.

In 2009, Hutchison bought the two hulking, gunmetal-gray machines he uses to master records — a Lyrec tape deck and lathe, with Ortofon amplifiers, both from 1965 — and spent more than $150,000 restoring them over three years. He has invested thousands more on improvements like replacing their copper wiring with mined silver, which Hutchison said gives the audio signal a greater level of purity.

The machines allow Hutchison to exclude any trace of technology that has crept into the recording process since a time when the Beatles were in moptops. That means not only anything digital or computerized, but also transistors, a mainstay of audio circuitry for decades; instead, the machines’ amplifiers are powered by vacuum tubes (or valves, as British engineers call them).

 

“We’re all about valves here,” Hutchison said on a tour of the label’s studio.

Mastering a vinyl record involves “cutting” grooves into a lacquer disc, a dark art in which tiny adjustments can have a big effect. Unusually among engineers, Hutchison tends to master records at low volumes — sometimes even quieter than the originals — to bring out more of the natural feel of the instruments.
He demonstrated his technique during a recent mastering session for “Mal/2,” a 1957 album by the jazz pianist Mal Waldron that features an appearance by Coltrane. He tested several mastering levels for the song “One by One” — which has lots of staccato trumpet notes, played by Idrees Sulieman — before settling on one that preserved the excitement of the original tape but avoided what Hutchison called a “honk” when the horns reached a climax.

“What you want to hear is the clarity, the harmonics, the textures,” he said. “What you don’t want is to put it on and feel like you’ve got to turn it down.”

These judgments are often subjective. But to test Hutchison’s approach, I visited the New Jersey home of Michael Fremer, a contributing editor at Stereophile and a longtime champion of vinyl. We listened to a handful of Electric Recording releases, comparing them to pressings of the same material by other companies, on Fremer’s state-of-the-art test system (the speakers alone cost $100,000).
Hutchison bought the two hulking, gunmetal-gray machines he uses to master records — both from 1965 — and spent more than $150,000 restoring them over three years.Credit…Tom Jamieson for The New York Times

 

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I am often skeptical of claims of vinyl’s superiority, but when listening to one of Electric Recording’s albums of Bach’s solo violin pieces played by Martzy, I was stunned by their clearness and beauty. Compared to the other pressings, Electric Recording’s version had vivid, visceral details, yielding a persuasive illusion of a human being standing before me drawing a bow across a violin.
“It’s magical what they’re doing, recreating these old records,” Fremer said as he swapped out more Electric Recording discs.

Hutchison is a surprising candidate to carry the torch for sepia-toned classical fidelity. In the 1990s, he was a player in the British techno scene with his label Peacefrog; the label’s success in the early 2000s with the minimalist folk of José González helped finance the obsession that became Electric Recording.

Hutchison’s conversion happened after he inherited the classical records owned by his father, who died in 1998. A longtime collector of rock and jazz, Hutchison was entranced by the sound of the decades-old originals, and found newer reissues unsatisfying. He learned that Peacefrog’s distributor, EMI, owned the rights to many of his new favorites. Was it possible to recreate things exactly has they had been done the first time around?

After restoring the machines, Electric Recording put its first three albums on sale in late 2012 — Martzy’s solo Bach sets, originally issued in the mid-1950s.

Hutchison decided that true fidelity applied to packaging as well as recording. Letterpress printing drove up his manufacturing costs, and some of the label’s projects have seemed to push the boundaries of absurdity.

In making “Mozart à Paris,” for example, a near-perfect simulacrum of a deluxe 1956 box set, Hutchison spent months scouring London’s haberdashers to find the right strand of silk for a decorative cord. The seven-disc set is Electric Recording’s most expensive title, at about $3,400 — and one of the few in its catalog that has not sold out.

Hutchison defends such efforts as part of the label’s devotion to authenticity. But it comes at a cost. Its manufacturing methods, and the quality-control attention paid to each record, bring no economies of scale. So Electric Recording would gain no reduction in expenses if it made more, thus negating the question Hutchison is most frequently asked: Why not press more records and sell them more cheaply?

“We probably make the most expensive records in the world,” Hutchison said, “and make the least profit.”

Electric Recording’s prices have drawn head-scratching through the cliquey world of high-end vinyl producers. Chad Kassem, whose company Acoustic Sounds, in Salina, Kan., is one of the world’s biggest vinyl empires, said he admired Hutchison’s work.

“I tip my hat to any company that goes the extra mile to make things as best as possible,” Kassem said.

But he said he was proud of Acoustic Sounds’s work, which like Electric Recording cuts its masters from original tapes and goes to great lengths to capture original design details — and sells most of its records for about $35. I asked Kassem what is the difference between a $35 reissue and a $500 one.
He paused for a moment, then said: “Four hundred sixty-five dollars.”

Yet the market has embraced Electric Recording. Even amid the coronavirus pandemic, Hutchison said, its records have been selling as fast as ever, although the company has had some production hiccups. The only manufacturer of a fabric that Hutchison chose for a Mozart set in the works, by the pianist Lili Kraus, has been locked down in Italy.

The next frontier for Electric Recording is rock. Hutchison recently got permission to reissue “Forever Changes,” the classic 1967 psychedelic album by the California band Love, and said that the original tape had a more unvarnished sound than most fans had heard. He expects that to be released in July, and “Mal/2” is due in August.

But Hutchison seemed most proud of the label’s work on classical records that seemed to come from a distant era. He pulled out a 10-inch mini-album of Bach by the French pianist Yvonne Lefébure, originally released in 1955. Electric Recording painstakingly recreated its dowel spine, its cotton sleeve, its leather cover embossed in gold leaf.

“It’s a nice artifact,” Hutchison said, looking at it lovingly. “It’s a great record as well.”

 

Source : The New York Times

 

 

 

NEW GRID APRIL 2020 / NOUVELLE GRILLE AVRIL 2020


Nous vous présentons la nouvelle grille du Printemps Eté 2020

We present to you the new Spring Summer 2020 grid

 

GRID  2020

GRID 2020

Lors d’une séance de musicothérapie, les cerveaux d’un patient et d’un thérapeute se synchronisent — Blog Nutrition Santé


Une définition de la musicothérapie unique n’existe pas, car elle ne contente pas l’unanimité des praticiens. Cependant, une chose est sûre, il s’agit d’une pratique transdisciplinaire dont les bienfaits en font un soin de support de plus en plus privilégié. Actuellement, la musicothérapie est une pratique quasiment présente sur tous les continents, que ce soit […]

via Lors d’une séance de musicothérapie, les cerveaux d’un patient et d’un thérapeute se synchronisent — Blog Nutrition Santé

 

 

musicotherapie

Il construit des pianos de 5 mètres de hauteur (vidéo)


#Piano #Music #Musique

Etrange et Insolite

David Klavins est un pianiste qui, pendant des années, n’a pas pu trouver de pianos produisant les sons qu’il imaginait dans sa tête.

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FATS DOMINO 02-1928- 10-2017


Antoine “Fats” Domino, Jr. (February 26, 1928 – October 24, 2017) was an American pianist and singer-songwriter of Louisiana Creole descent.

He had 35 records in the U.S. Billboard Top 40, and five of his pre-1955 records sold more than a million copies, being certified gold.  During 1955 to 1960, he had eleven top 10 hits and his record sales were reportedly surpassed only by Elvis Presley. During his career, Domino sold over 65 million records.His musical style was based on traditional rhythm and blues, accompanied by saxophones, bass, piano, electric guitar, and drums.

 

 

Video : Source Youtube : Historic Films Stock Footage Archive

RADIO SATELLITE. THE RETURN


Here we go.. Again just for you. Radio Satellite is back

 

Yes, back but there is some changes. Before Radio Satellite was playig Oldies songs

As Radio Satellite2 is now here for such genre and style. Radio Satellite2 with  “1 million  listeners” from all around the world…

So Radio Satellite is back in another form…As INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC

If you like ( or love ) Guitars? Piano? Piano Bar? Sax? Violins?

Artists : Ennio Morricone? James Last? Fausto Papetti? Andre Rieu?  Paul Mauriat? etc..

Well, there will be no doubt that you’ll love Radio Satellite

Just click on the player ( above…right of this website) and you’ll get another website which contains both players

The automatic RADIO SATELLITE will start after around 15 seconds

For RADIO SATELLITE2, the player will have to be connect manually, if you want to listen to RS2

Enjoy the best music

Radio Satellite2 : Oldies hits from all the world to all the world

Radio Satellite : Instrument music from all around the world

 

Radio Satellite est de retour

Certes le format sera tout nouveau. Au lieu de reprendre le format d’origine (Oldies Hits)

Etant donné que Radio Satellite2 a déjà rempli la mission et a dépassé largement “le million d’auditeurs”…

Radio Satellite aura pour mission de jouer, rien que des musiques instrumentales… Pour notre plaisir

Pour écouter RS1 alias Radio Satellite:

Pour écouter RS2 alias Radio Satellite2 :

Il suffit de cliquer sur le player..en haut..à droite de ce site…Nous verrons un autre site s’ouvrir à nous

 

RS1 se lance automatiquement au bout de 15 secondes ( donc l’arrêt est possible en cliquant sur le lecteur / player évidemment)

RS2 se lance manuellement si vous le souhaitez : Idem en cliquant sur le lecteur / Player

Radio Satellite2 et Radio Satellite sont à votre disposition

 

http://radiosatellite2.com

 

 

RADIO SATELLITE

RADIO SATELLITE

RADIO SATELLITE2

EDMOND REDD


HI! I’M EDMOND REDD

and I compose, amongst a variety of genres, epic orchestral trailer music.

I write music for different projects, including short films and TV commercials; in addition to that I also work on my own solo projects.

Check my newly added section Production Music where you can find library-ready cues, watch my latest commercial work, listen to some music and download your favorite tracks.

If you’re interested in licensing any of the music found here, or in collaborating on a project, I’d love to hear from you.

Thank you for visiting my website, meanwhile, stay a while and have a good time

 

https://www.edmondredd.com

 

 

Edmond Redd

Edmond Redd

Just click and listen…work with music


Just click  below on one of them 🙂

RADIO SATELLITE2 at RadioForest.net

RADIO SATELLITE2 at RadioForest.net

RADIO SATELLITE2 at RadioForest.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://radiosatellite.co/2015/09/29/player-page-for-rs2/

FATS WALLER …


Thomas Wright “Fats” Waller (May 21, 1904 – December 15, 1943) was an American jazz pianist, organist, composer, singer, and comedic entertainer, whose innovations to the Harlem stride style laid the groundwork for modern jazz piano, and whose best-known compositions, “Ain’t Misbehavin'” and “Honeysuckle Rose”, were inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1984 and 1999.

Fats_Waller

 

 

Thomas Wright Waller was the youngest of 11 children (five survived childhood) born to Adeline Locket Waller and Reverend Edward Martin Waller in New York City.
He started playing the piano when he was six and graduated to the organ of his father’s church four years later.
His mother instructed him as a youth. At the age of 14 he was playing the organ at Harlem’s Lincoln Theater and within 12 months he had composed his first rag. Waller’s first piano solos (“Muscle Shoals Blues” and “Birmingham Blues”) were recorded in October 1922 when he was 18 years old.
He was the prize pupil, and later friend and colleague, of stride pianist James P. Johnson.
Overcoming opposition from his clergyman father, Waller became a professional pianist at 15, working in cabarets and theaters.[citation needed] In 1918 he won a talent contest playing Johnson’s “Carolina Shout”, a song he learned from watching a player piano play it.
Waller ultimately became one of the most popular performers of his era, finding critical and commercial success in his homeland and in Europe. He was also a prolific songwriter and many songs he wrote or co-wrote are still popular, such as “Honeysuckle Rose”, “Ain’t Misbehavin'” and “Squeeze Me”.
Fellow pianist and composer Oscar Levant dubbed Waller “the black Horowitz”. Waller is believed to have composed many novelty tunes in the 1920s and 1930s and sold them for relatively small sums, the attributions of which, on becoming widely known, went only to a later composer and lyricist.
Standards alternatively and sometimes controversially attributed to Waller include “I Can’t Give You Anything but Love, Baby”.
Biographer Barry Singer conjectured that this jazz classic was written by Waller and lyricist Andy Razaf, and provides a description of the sale given by Waller to the NY Post in 1929—for $500, to a white songwriter, ultimately for use in a financially successful show (consistent with Jimmy McHugh’s contributions first to Harry Delmar’s Revels, 1927, and then to Blackbirds, 1928).
He further supports the conjecture, noting that early handwritten manuscripts in the Dana Library Institute of Jazz Studies of “Spreadin’ Rhythm Around” (Jimmy McHugh ©1935) are in Waller’s hand.
Jazz historian P.S. Machlin comments that the Singer conjecture has “considerable [historical] justification”.


Waller’s son Maurice wrote in his 1977 biography of his father that Waller had once complained on hearing the song, and came from upstairs to admonish him never to play it in his hearing because he had had to sell it when he needed money.
Maurice Waller’s biography similarly notes his father’s objections to hearing “On the Sunny Side of the Street” playing on the radio.
Waller recorded “I Can’t Give You…” in 1938, playing the tune but making fun of the lyrics; the recording was with Adelaide Hall who had introduced the song to the world at Les Ambassadeurs Club in New York in 1928.
The anonymous sleeve notes on the 1960 RCA Victor album Handful of Keys state that Waller copyrighted over 400 songs, many of which co-written with his closest collaborator Andy Razaf.
Razaf described his partner as “the soul of melody… a man who made the piano sing… both big in body and in mind… known for his generosity… a bubbling bundle of joy”.
Gene Sedric, a clarinetist who played with Waller on some of his 1930s recordings, is quoted in these same sleeve notes recalling Waller’s recording technique with considerable admiration: “Fats was the most relaxed man I ever saw in a studio, and so he made everybody else relaxed.
After a balance had been taken, we’d just need one take to make a side, unless it was a kind of difficult number.”

 

Waller played with many performers, from Nathaniel Shilkret and Gene Austin, to Erskine Tate, Fletcher Henderson, McKinney’s Cotton Pickers and Adelaide Hall, but his greatest success came with his own five- or six-piece combo, “Fats Waller and his Rhythm”.
His playing once put him at risk of injury. Waller was kidnapped in Chicago leaving a performance in 1926. Four men bundled him into a car and took him to the Hawthorne Inn, owned by Al Capone.
Waller was ordered inside the building, and found a party in full swing. Gun to his back, he was pushed towards a piano, and told to play. A terrified Waller realized he was the “surprise guest” at Capone’s birthday party, and took comfort that the gangsters did not intend to kill him.
It is rumored that Waller stayed at the Hawthorne Inn for three days and left very drunk, extremely tired, and had earned thousands of dollars in cash from Capone and other party-goers as tips.
In 1926, Waller began his recording association with the Victor Talking Machine Company/RCA Victor, his principal record company for the rest of his life, with the organ solos “St. Louis Blues” and his own composition, “Lenox Avenue Blues”.
Although he recorded with various groups, including Morris’s Hot Babes (1927), Fats Waller’s Buddies (1929) (one of the earliest multiracial groups to record), and McKinney’s Cotton Pickers (1929), his most important contribution to the Harlem stride piano tradition was a series of solo recordings of his own compositions: “Handful of Keys”, “Smashing Thirds”, “Numb Fumblin'”, and “Valentine Stomp” (1929).
After sessions with Ted Lewis (1931), Jack Teagarden (1931) and Billy Banks’ Rhythmakers (1932), he began in May 1934 the voluminous series of recordings with a small band known as Fats Waller and his Rhythm.
This six-piece group usually included Herman Autrey (sometimes replaced by Bill Coleman or John “Bugs” Hamilton), Gene Sedric or Rudy Powell, and Al Casey.
Waller wrote “Squeeze Me” (1919), “Keepin’ Out of Mischief Now”, “Ain’t Misbehavin'” (1929), “Blue Turning Grey Over You”, “I’ve Got a Feeling I’m Falling” (1929), “Honeysuckle Rose” (1929) and “Jitterbug Waltz” (1942). He composed stride piano display pieces such as “Handful of Keys”, “Valentine Stomp” and “Viper’s Drag”.
He enjoyed success touring the United Kingdom and Ireland in the 1930s. He appeared in one of the first BBC television broadcasts.

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While in Britain, Waller also recorded a number of songs for EMI on their Compton Theatre organ located in their Abbey Road Studios in St John’s Wood. He appeared in several feature films and short subject films, most notably Stormy Weather in 1943, which was released July 21, just months before his death.
For the hit Broadway show Hot Chocolates, he and Razaf wrote “(What Did I Do to Be So) Black and Blue” (1929), which became a hit for Ethel Waters and Louis Armstrong.
Waller performed Bach organ pieces for small groups on occasion. Waller influenced many pre-bebop jazz pianists; Count Basie and Erroll Garner have both reanimated his hit songs. In addition to his playing, Waller was known for his many quips during his performances.
Between 1926 and the end of 1927, Waller recorded a series of pipe organ solo records. These represent the first time syncopated jazz compositions were performed on a full-sized church organ.
Waller contracted pneumonia and died on a cross-country train trip near Kansas City, Missouri, on December 15, 1943. His final recording session was with an interracial group in Detroit, Michigan, that included white trumpeter Don Hirleman.

Waller was returning to New York City from Los Angeles, after the smash success of Stormy Weather, and after a successful engagement at the Zanzibar Room, during which he had fallen ill.
More than 4,000 people attended his funeral in Harlem, which prompted Dr. Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., who delivered the eulogy, to say that Fats Waller “always played to a packed house.”
Afterwards he was cremated and his ashes were scattered, from an airplane piloted by an unidentified World War black aviator, over Harlem.
One of his surviving relatives is former Georgia Tech Yellow Jacket and current Baltimore Ravens wideout Darren Waller, who is Fats’ paternal great-grandson.

 

Sources WIKIPEDIA

 

 

 

For-Piano- Jazz lovers… From Paris with love.


Artist: Paul KETTERER

 

 

 

Instrumental music, Jazz…Daily on RS2  : Between Midnight and 05h00 AM paris Time.

 

Jet Lag between FRANCE – USA 

france usa

RECITAL PIANO: GÜLSIN ONAY


Gülsin Onay (born 12 September 1954 in Istanbul) is a leading Turkish concert pianist.

Education

Born into a musical family, Gülsin Onay began to play the piano at the age of three. Her first teacher was her mother.

When she was 6 years old, Gülsin Onay gave her first concert on TRT Radio Istanbul. At the age of 10, she received a special government scholarship under the Üstün Yetenekli Çocuklar Kanunu (Law for Exceptionally Talented Children), which enabled her to study first in Ankara with Mithat Fenmen and Ahmed Adnan Saygun, and two years later at the Paris Conservatory, where her teachers were Pierre Sancan, Monique Haas, Pierre Fiquet and Nadia Boulanger.

At the age of 16 she graduated with the Premier Prix de Piano. She continued her studies with Bernhard Ebert at the Musikhochschule Hannover.

 

Career

At the outset of her career Gülsin Onay took prizes in leading competitions, including the Marguerite Long-Jacques Thibaud Piano Competition (Paris) and the Ferruccio Busoni International Piano Competition (Bolzano).

Since then she has played in the musical centres of 65 countries in a career spanning all continents.

She has played with orchestras including Dresden Staatskapelle, English Chamber Orchestra, Japan Philharmonic, Munich Radio Symphony, Royal Philharmonic, St Petersburg Philharmonic, Tokyo Symphony, Warsaw Philharmonic and Vienna Symphony Orchestras, under such conductors as Vladimir Ashkenazy, Erich Bergel, Michael Boder, Andrey Boreyko, Jörg Faerber, Edward Gardner, Emmanuel Krivine, Ingo Metzmacher, Jose Serebrier, Vassily Sinaisky, Stanislaw Wislocki and Lothar Zagrosek. Ms. Onay’s many festival appearances include Berlin, Warsaw, Granada, Mozartfest Würzburg, Newport, Schleswig-Holstein and Istanbul.

An exceptional Chopin interpreter, Gülsin Onay was in 2007 honoured with the award of a State Medal by the Polish nation.

She is also acknowledged worldwide as the finest interpreter of the music of Ahmed Adnan Saygun, whose works feature prominently in her concerts and recordings, and whose 2nd Piano Concerto (which she has premiered in Turkey and abroad) was dedicated to her.

Other contemporary composers who have dedicated works to Gülsin Onay are Hubert Stuppner, Denis Dufour, Jean-Louis Petit, Muhiddin Dürrüoğlu and Marc-André Hamelin. Gülsin Onay has also given world premieres of concertos by Stuppner and Tabakov.

As state artist, Gülsin Onay is an official soloist of the Presidential Symphony Orchestra in Ankara. She is Artist in Residence at Bilkent University in Ankara.

Gülsin Onay is Artistic Advisor of the Gümüşlük International Classical Music Festival

 

Recordings

“An exceptional pianist, endowed with virtuosic brilliance and boundless energy, and an interpretive power both intelligent and emotionally sensitive”, Gülsin Onay has recorded 20 albums that illustrate the breadth of her repertoire as well as her interpretive power.

Her 2007 CD featuring live concert recordings of Tchaikovsky’s 1st and Rachmaninov’s 3rd Piano Concerto, has been acclaimed by critics and virtuosi alike. In 2008 CPO released her recording of both Saygun concertos with the Bilkent Symphony Orchestra and Howard Griffiths, to widespread critical acclaim.

Most recently, the American label VAI has released a live DVD of her performances of the Grieg Concerto and the Saint-Saëns 2nd Concerto, to be followed in early 2011 by the first of two live recital DVDs, featuring her critically acclaimed performances from the Miami International Piano Festival.

Many of Ms. Onay’s concerts have been broadcast on European radio and television, and in the USA on National Public Radio.

Honours

Honorary doctorate degrees from Bosphorus University in Istanbul, and from Hacettepe University in Ankara.

State Artist of the Republic of Turkey (1987).

Appointed Goodwill Ambassador by the Turkish national committee of UNICEF in 2003.

Gold Cross of Merit of the Polish nation (2007), awarded by the Polish President Lech Kaczyński for her contributions to Polish culture through her outstanding performances of the music of Chopin.

2007 Honorary Award Medal of the Sevda-Cenap And Music Foundation.

Other

Gülsin Onay’s mother is the daughter of the famous Turkish mathematician and scientist Kerim Erim.

Gülsin Onay’s son Erkin Onay is a professional violinist. He is currently a concertmaster of the orchestra of the Ankara State Opera and Ballet.

Gülsin Onay is married to Tony Scholl, Professor of Algebra and Number Theory at Cambridge University.

Sources Wikipedia

Images/ Vidéos: Webradio: “Radio Satellite2”

 

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