SOLO POUR DEUX / ALL OF ME


All of Me  film américain( Titre en Français : Solo pour 2 ) : Réalisation Carl Reiner

Une femme riche et excentrique mourante désire transférer son esprit dans le corps d’une jeune femme dont le père est employé d’écurie chez elle.

Cependant, l’opération foire. La dame malade , Edwina CUTWATER ( rôle tenu par Lily Tomlin)  se retrouve dans le corps de son avocat. Corps qu’ils partagent à 2.

Elle occupe et maitrise les organes du corps se trouvant au côté droit ( pied et main droite) alors que l’avocat  ROGER COBB ( rôle joué par Steve Martin) contrôle le bras et pied gauche.

Evidemment ca se complique au quotidien du fait qu’il faille coordonnées leurs gestes pour faire « bouger » aussi bien le pied gauche que droite pour marcher. Idem pour écrire et …pour aller aux toilettes. COBB étant droitier, donc il a besoin de la « participation » d’Edwina pour ses besoins  sanitaires (pour ouvrir la braguette et toute la suite, en tant que droitier).

Tout se complique par la suite. Sans rentrer dans les détails du film que nous vous laisserons voir si l’occasion se présente.

Un film Paramount qui date de 1984 mais qui vaut le détour.

Même si le sujet du film semble relativement frivole. Il est même surréaliste ( parce que dans le film, changer de corps via un gourou venant d’on ne sait où mais vivant au Tibet apparemment : Ce changement de corps se fait en moins de 15 secondes et aussi facilement qu’on changerait de chemise. D’où l’absurdité du sujet mais le message étant plus profond : Il essaie de transmettre l’idée de vivre « sa vie », en profiter, « vivre avec soi et avec les autres » ( Dans ce cas, c’est exagéré puisque l’autre vit dans le même corps) mais au final,  la richesse n’aura servi à rien à Edwin qui n’a jamais accompli de bien autour d’elle. Tout comme elle n’avait aucun ami.

Même chose pour COBB, musicien de jazz à ses heures perdues. Il se morfondait dans un cabinet d’avocat où le patron ne lui confiait que des missions de « messagers » ou de paperasses sans intérêt et sans pour aider « son prochain » : Cobb ayant voulu faire carrière en tant qu’avocat pour aider les pauvres. Au final, il aidait les riches à la demande de son patron

(Le cas d’Edwina, multimilliardaire)

Pour résumer : Une comédie surréaliste, sympa divertissante mettant en scène :Un avocat désespéré, une malade désespérée, une jeune fille au casier judiciaire lourd, un gourou qui ne parle pas et un musicien ( ami de COBB) qui ne voit pas mais a vite cru l’histoire de transfert sans poser de question et sans s’en étonner.

Steve Martin  : Roger Cobb ( avocat )

Lily Tomlin : Edwina Cutwater (Multimillardaire malade)

Victoria Tennant  : Terry Hoskins (Jeune fille à la vie compliquée devant reçevoir l’esprit d’Edwina)

Richard Libertini : Prahka Lasa ( Le gourou qui passe  son temps à les suivre avec le bol qui sert pour le transfert des personnes).

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Vidéos : Source Youtube. Photo: Google

Records and recording


LONDON — Tucked in a trendy co-working complex in West London, just past the food court and the payment processing start-up, is perhaps the most technologically backward-looking record company in the world.

 

LONDON — Tucked in a trendy co-working complex in West London, just past the food court and the payment processing start-up, is perhaps the most technologically backward-looking record company in the world.

 

The Electric Recording Co., which has been releasing music since 2012, specializes in meticulous recreations of classical and jazz albums from the 1950s and ’60s. Its catalog includes reissues of landmark recordings by Wilhelm Furtwängler, John Coltrane and Thelonious Monk, as well as lesser-known artists favored by collectors, like the violinist Johanna Martzy.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

But what really sets Electric Recording apart is its method — a philosophy of production more akin to the making of small-batch gourmet chocolate than most shrink-wrapped vinyl.

 

Its albums, assembled by hand and released in editions of 300 or fewer — at a cost of $400 to $600 for each LP — are made with restored vintage equipment down to glowing vacuum-tube amplifiers, and mono tape systems that have not been used in more than half a century.

The goal is to ensure a faithful restoration of what the label’s founder, Pete Hutchison, sees as a lost golden age of record-making. Even its record jackets, printed one by one on letterpress machines, show a fanatical devotion to age-old craft.

“It started as wanting to recreate the original but not make it a sort of pastiche,” Hutchison said in a recent interview. “And in order not to create a pastiche, we had to do everything as they had done it.”

 

Electric Recording’s attention to detail, and Hutchison’s delicate engineering style in mastering old records, have given the label a revered status among collectors — yet also drawn subtle ridicule among rivals who view its approach as needlessly expensive and too precious by half.

 

An original Lyrec T818 tape machine that the label has painstakingly renovated, in its London studio.Credit…Tom Jamieson for The New York Times

original Lyrec T818 tape machine

original Lyrec T818 tape machine

 

Hutchison, 53, whose sharp features and foot-long beard make him look like a wayward wizard from “The Lord of the Rings,” dismissed such critiques as examples of the audiophile world’s catty tribalism. Even the word “audiophile,” he feels, is more often an empty marketing gimmick than a reliable sign of quality.
“Audiophiles listen with their ears, not with their hearts,” Hutchison said. He added: “That’s not our game, really.”

So what’s his game?

“The game is trying to do something that is anti-generic, if you like,” he said. “What we’re doing with these old records is essentially taking the technology from the time and remaking it as it was done then, rather than compromising it.”

To a large degree, the vinyl resurgence of the last decade has been fueled by reissues. But no reissue label has gone to the same extremes as Electric Recording.

In 2009, Hutchison bought the two hulking, gunmetal-gray machines he uses to master records — a Lyrec tape deck and lathe, with Ortofon amplifiers, both from 1965 — and spent more than $150,000 restoring them over three years. He has invested thousands more on improvements like replacing their copper wiring with mined silver, which Hutchison said gives the audio signal a greater level of purity.

The machines allow Hutchison to exclude any trace of technology that has crept into the recording process since a time when the Beatles were in moptops. That means not only anything digital or computerized, but also transistors, a mainstay of audio circuitry for decades; instead, the machines’ amplifiers are powered by vacuum tubes (or valves, as British engineers call them).

 

“We’re all about valves here,” Hutchison said on a tour of the label’s studio.

Mastering a vinyl record involves “cutting” grooves into a lacquer disc, a dark art in which tiny adjustments can have a big effect. Unusually among engineers, Hutchison tends to master records at low volumes — sometimes even quieter than the originals — to bring out more of the natural feel of the instruments.
He demonstrated his technique during a recent mastering session for “Mal/2,” a 1957 album by the jazz pianist Mal Waldron that features an appearance by Coltrane. He tested several mastering levels for the song “One by One” — which has lots of staccato trumpet notes, played by Idrees Sulieman — before settling on one that preserved the excitement of the original tape but avoided what Hutchison called a “honk” when the horns reached a climax.

“What you want to hear is the clarity, the harmonics, the textures,” he said. “What you don’t want is to put it on and feel like you’ve got to turn it down.”

These judgments are often subjective. But to test Hutchison’s approach, I visited the New Jersey home of Michael Fremer, a contributing editor at Stereophile and a longtime champion of vinyl. We listened to a handful of Electric Recording releases, comparing them to pressings of the same material by other companies, on Fremer’s state-of-the-art test system (the speakers alone cost $100,000).
Hutchison bought the two hulking, gunmetal-gray machines he uses to master records — both from 1965 — and spent more than $150,000 restoring them over three years.Credit…Tom Jamieson for The New York Times

 

vinyl 3

 

I am often skeptical of claims of vinyl’s superiority, but when listening to one of Electric Recording’s albums of Bach’s solo violin pieces played by Martzy, I was stunned by their clearness and beauty. Compared to the other pressings, Electric Recording’s version had vivid, visceral details, yielding a persuasive illusion of a human being standing before me drawing a bow across a violin.
“It’s magical what they’re doing, recreating these old records,” Fremer said as he swapped out more Electric Recording discs.

Hutchison is a surprising candidate to carry the torch for sepia-toned classical fidelity. In the 1990s, he was a player in the British techno scene with his label Peacefrog; the label’s success in the early 2000s with the minimalist folk of José González helped finance the obsession that became Electric Recording.

Hutchison’s conversion happened after he inherited the classical records owned by his father, who died in 1998. A longtime collector of rock and jazz, Hutchison was entranced by the sound of the decades-old originals, and found newer reissues unsatisfying. He learned that Peacefrog’s distributor, EMI, owned the rights to many of his new favorites. Was it possible to recreate things exactly has they had been done the first time around?

After restoring the machines, Electric Recording put its first three albums on sale in late 2012 — Martzy’s solo Bach sets, originally issued in the mid-1950s.

Hutchison decided that true fidelity applied to packaging as well as recording. Letterpress printing drove up his manufacturing costs, and some of the label’s projects have seemed to push the boundaries of absurdity.

In making “Mozart à Paris,” for example, a near-perfect simulacrum of a deluxe 1956 box set, Hutchison spent months scouring London’s haberdashers to find the right strand of silk for a decorative cord. The seven-disc set is Electric Recording’s most expensive title, at about $3,400 — and one of the few in its catalog that has not sold out.

Hutchison defends such efforts as part of the label’s devotion to authenticity. But it comes at a cost. Its manufacturing methods, and the quality-control attention paid to each record, bring no economies of scale. So Electric Recording would gain no reduction in expenses if it made more, thus negating the question Hutchison is most frequently asked: Why not press more records and sell them more cheaply?

“We probably make the most expensive records in the world,” Hutchison said, “and make the least profit.”

Electric Recording’s prices have drawn head-scratching through the cliquey world of high-end vinyl producers. Chad Kassem, whose company Acoustic Sounds, in Salina, Kan., is one of the world’s biggest vinyl empires, said he admired Hutchison’s work.

“I tip my hat to any company that goes the extra mile to make things as best as possible,” Kassem said.

But he said he was proud of Acoustic Sounds’s work, which like Electric Recording cuts its masters from original tapes and goes to great lengths to capture original design details — and sells most of its records for about $35. I asked Kassem what is the difference between a $35 reissue and a $500 one.
He paused for a moment, then said: “Four hundred sixty-five dollars.”

Yet the market has embraced Electric Recording. Even amid the coronavirus pandemic, Hutchison said, its records have been selling as fast as ever, although the company has had some production hiccups. The only manufacturer of a fabric that Hutchison chose for a Mozart set in the works, by the pianist Lili Kraus, has been locked down in Italy.

The next frontier for Electric Recording is rock. Hutchison recently got permission to reissue “Forever Changes,” the classic 1967 psychedelic album by the California band Love, and said that the original tape had a more unvarnished sound than most fans had heard. He expects that to be released in July, and “Mal/2” is due in August.

But Hutchison seemed most proud of the label’s work on classical records that seemed to come from a distant era. He pulled out a 10-inch mini-album of Bach by the French pianist Yvonne Lefébure, originally released in 1955. Electric Recording painstakingly recreated its dowel spine, its cotton sleeve, its leather cover embossed in gold leaf.

“It’s a nice artifact,” Hutchison said, looking at it lovingly. “It’s a great record as well.”

 

Source : The New York Times

 

 

 

Follow us


Aide / cotisation / Contribution

RadioSatellite: Rédaction et radio sont une activité non commerciale. Seuls votre participation et cotisation libre peut aider le site/la radio à poursuivre leurs activités pour acquérir matériel et outils. Merci. —————————————– —————————————– Radio Satellite: Website and radio are a non-commercial activity. Only your participation and free subscription can help the site / radio to continue their activities to acquire equipment and tools. Thank you

€2.00

You can follow us here , of course.

And you can follow us on our Youtube page, to be informed about all our new videos ( and watch our old , recent, actual videos ( more than 120 videos)

Videos concerning our travels : Egypt, Instanbul, London, Paris and more

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJswzoRko4H4SHBgssQIFUA

 

 

COVER YOUTUBE RADIOSATELLITE

Alexa Amazon


Ce jour, nous avons décidé de tester un produit : Le “smartspeaker” (dit en français : L’assistant intelligent ).

Pour ce, nous avons reçu le “smartspeaker” de celui d’Amazon : Alexa. ( Alexa Echo Dot 2e Génération)

Alexa Amazon Echo Dot

Alexa Amazon Echo Dot

Pour être franc, outre les usages partiels et rapides auprès des entreprises et groupes qui nous avaient montrés à l’époque ce produit,   nous n’avions pas eu l’occasion de le tester longtemps et d’une manière plus profonde.

Ce fut une véritable joie et excitation que de paramétrer ce petit joujou, qui du premier abord pourrait nous paraître comme “gadget ” mais au final, nous nous y habituons et il devient partie intégrante du paysage de nos bureaux ( et / ou de nos maisons).

Il a fallu choisir entre la langue anglaise et française ( eh oui…Nous pouvons choisir la langue, cependant, ce qui en découle est important:

=> Si nous optons pour le FR, nous serons connectés directement sur le “amazon shop” de france. Cad nous aurons tous les médias, sites parlant français. Exit , les médias autres que Français cad ceux des US et UK, russie, inde, arabes , hébreux … bref toutes les langues du monde ( A la radio, nous sommes plus que polyglottes et plus de 15 langues cohabitent puisque nous diffusons mondialement et que nous ne sommes pas focalisés sur la France ou l’europe seulement).

Donc, il a fallu paramétrer… Le français fut choisi in fine, étant donné que nous sommes à PARIS  ( attention, nous parlons du Test effectué en français, cependant, nos différents “smartspeakers” dans nos studios , sont paramétrés dans diverses langues. Selon la team / le pôle en charge ( Nos équipes sont organisées par “continent + langue” )

Comme vous verrez sur cette vidéo, en saluant Alexa, il a fallu la calmer et l’arrêter 🙂  puisque la machine était paramétrée pour nous annoncer les principaux évènements de la journée, rien qu’en la saluant ( “bonjour” ) : Donc ceci est à revoir

C’est la faute de notre équipe qui a voulu s’amuser. Cependant, en tant normal, Alexa répond “Bonjour + le nom de la personne, qu’elle reconnait par la voix ).

La machine est personnalisable.

 

 

En fait, cet outil est interessant à divers niveaux :

Outre le fait qu’Alexa  nous lance , les radios ( dont la nôtre RadioSatellite) , nous avons pu lui demander de rajouter sur notre calendrier / agenda, divers évènements.

Vocalement, nous lui demandons de rajouter” Alexa, rajoute sur la TO DO LIST, mon rendez vous demain à 16h00 à Madame Dupond à l’adresse XX à Londres ou à New York ou Paris

Ce rendez vous est rajouté immédiatement sur un calendrier déjà créé aussi bien,  sur notre smartphone  que sur la machine (  Application qu’on a déjà installé, aussi, sur nos smartphones) .

alexa smartspeaker amazon

alexa smartspeaker amazon

Ne pas oublier que les “smartspeakers” fonctionnent en harmonie avec les “smartphones” ( ou tablettes) notamment lors du paramétrage du démarrage.

Il suffit de lui demander le matin ” Alexa, il y a quoi sur ma TO DO LIST pour aujourd’hui?  ” et voilà…Alexa nous rappelle tout et nous n’avons plus aucun pretexte de louper une réunion ou rendez-vous.

Nous pouvons supprimer “vocalement” aussi un rendez vous. Il sera supprimé  (aussi ) du calendrier existant sur notre smartphone.

Pour la France, nous avons pu découvrir un calendrier ( c’est obligé, il faut qu’il y ait un calendrier en SKILL pour le rapprocher avec la machine Alexa.)  :

Le calendrier   https://www.any.do/

any.do

any.do

 

En tout cas, c’est l’une des fonctions … Il existe des milliers de Skills ( Une sKILL c’est l’équivalent des applications pour smartphones). Skills à activer sur Alexa. ( Contrairement aux apps des smartphones,  sur ces machines, nous n’installons pas de Skill…Pas de téléchargment…c’est juste l’activation ou la désactivation => Désactivation  par défaut )

Pour revenir à Alexa  amazon:

C’est un vrai assistant personnel , cet outil. La qualité du son est plus que correcte. Même que nous pouvons connecter Alexa à des enceintes  BlueTooth si l’on veut ( ce n’est pas obligé mais c’est une option en plus à notre disposition ).

Pour notre part, il nous sert pour l’instant de calendrier, de moteur de recherche vocal pour nous trouver un bon restaurant tous les midis, les itinéraires, les grèves et pannes de transports en commun ou routiers. Evidemment pour écouter les flash infos ou les radios etc..

Pour résumer, Alexa est utile. Ce n’est pas “uniquement” un gadget à offrir à sa famille. C’est aussi un outil de travail pour une meilleure productivité et un calendrier  vocal / écrit que les équipes peuvent mettre en commun pour le suivi des journées, rendez vous et TO DO LISTS

Logo App Alexa

Logo App Alexa

Funny video


Cela fait longtemps que je n’ai pas partagé avec vous des infos, des histoires drôles ou autres

 

Voici une vidéo marrante 🙂

 

Hi all, it has been a long time, we didn”t meet and share funny news or videos. That’s why, today, we have this great funny show  .