CARY GRANT : On PARAMOUNT CHANNEL


PARAMOUNT CHANNEL : CARY GRANT

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Wikipedia sources: 

Cary Grant (born Archibald Alexander Leach; January 18, 1904 – November 29, 1986) was an English stage and Hollywood film actor who became an American citizen in 1942. Known for his transatlantic accent, debonair demeanor and “dashing good looks”, Grant is considered one of classic Hollywood‘s definitive leading men.

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Notorious (1946), The Bishop’s Wife (1947), To Catch a Thief (1955), An Affair to Remember (1957), North by Northwest (1959), and Charade (1963).

Nominated twice for the Academy Award for Best Actor (Penny Serenade and None But the Lonely Heart) and five times for a Golden Globe Award for Best Actor, Grant was continually passed over. In 1970, he was presented an Honorary Oscar at the 42nd Academy Awards by Frank Sinatra “for his unique mastery of the art of screen acting with the respect and affection of his colleagues

Early life and career

Archibald Alexander Leach was born at 15 Hughenden Road, HorfieldBristolEngland, to Elsie Maria (née Kingdon) Leach (1877–1973) and Elias James Leach (1873–1935). An only child, Leach had an unhappy upbringing, attending Bishop Road Primary School.

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CARY GRANT WITH AUDREY HEPBURN

His mother had suffered from clinical depression since the death of a previous child. Her husband placed her in a mental institution and told his 9-year-old son only that she had gone away on a “long holiday”. Believing she was dead, Leach did not learn otherwise until he was 31 and discovered her alive in a care facility.  When Leach was 10, his father abandoned him after remarrying and having a baby with his new young wife. 

Leach was expelled from the Fairfield Grammar School in Bristol in 1918. After joining the “Bob Pender Stage Troupe”, Leach performed as a stilt walker and traveled with the group to the United States in 1920 at the age of 16 on the RMS Olympic, on a two-year tour of the country. He was processed at Ellis Island on July 28, 1920.

When the troupe returned to the UK, he decided to stay in the U.S. and continue his stage career. During this time, he became a part of thevaudeville world and toured with Parker, Rand, and Leach.

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Still using his birth name, he performed on the stage at The Muny in St. Louis,Missouri, in such shows as Irene (1931), Music in May (1931), Nina Rosa (1931), Rio Rita (1931), Street Singer (1931), The Three Musketeers (1931), and Wonderful Night (1931). Leach’s experience on stage as a stilt walker, acrobat, juggler, and mime taught him “phenomenal physical grace and exquisite comic timing” and the value of teamwork, skills which would benefit him in Hollywood.

Leach became a naturalized United States citizen on June 26, 1942, at which time he also legally changed his name from “Archibald Alexander Leach” to “Cary Grant”.

After appearing in several musicals on Broadway under the name Archie Leach, Leach went to Hollywood in 1931.  When told to change his name, he proposed “Cary Lockwood”, the name of the character he had played in the Broadway show Nikki, based upon the recent film The Last Flight.

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He signed with Paramount Pictures, where studio bosses decided that the name “Cary” was acceptable but that “Lockwood” was too similar to another actor’s surname. Paramount gave their new actor a list of surnames to choose from, and he selected “Grant” because the initials C and G had already proved lucky for Clark Gable and Gary Cooper, two of Hollywood’s biggest film stars.

Grant appeared as a leading man opposite Marlene Dietrich in Blonde Venus (1932), and his stardom was given a further boost by Mae Westwhen she chose him for her leading man in two of her most successful films, She Done Him Wrong and I’m No Angel (both 1933).  

I’m No Angel was a tremendous financial success and, along with She Done Him Wrong, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Picture, saved Paramount from bankruptcy. Paramount put Grant in a series of unsuccessful films until 1936, when he signed with Columbia Pictures. His first major comedy hit was when he was loaned to Hal Roach‘s studio for the 1937 Topper (which was distributed by MGM).

The Awful Truth (1937) was a pivotal film in Grant’s career, establishing for him a screen persona as a sophisticated light comedy leading man. As Grant later wrote, “I pretended to be somebody I wanted to be and I finally became that person. Or he became me. Or we met at some point.”  Grant is said to have based his characterization in The Awful Truth on the mannerisms and intonations of the film’s director, Leo McCarey, whom he resembled physically. As writer/director Peter Bogdanovich noted, “After The Awful Truth, when it came to light comedy, there was Cary Grant and then everyone else was an also-ran.”

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CARY GRANT and GRACE KELLY

The Awful Truth began what The Atlantic later called “the most spectacular run ever for an actor in American pictures”.   During the next four years, Grant appeared in several classic romantic comedies and screwball comedies, including Holiday (1938) and Bringing Up Baby (1938), both opposite Katharine HepburnThe Philadelphia Story (1940) with Hepburn and James StewartHis Girl Friday (1940) with Rosalind Russell; and My Favorite Wife (1940), which reunited him with Irene Dunne, his co-star in The Awful Truth. During this time, he also made the adventure films Gunga Din (1939) with Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. and Only Angels Have Wings (1939) with Jean Arthur and Rita Hayworth and dramas Penny Serenade (1941), also with Dunne, and Suspicion (1941), the first of Grant’s four collaborations with Alfred Hitchcock.

Grant remained one of Hollywood’s top box-office attractions for almost 30 years.  Howard Hawks said that Grant was “so far the best that there isn’t anybody to be compared to him”.[15] David Thomson called him “the best and most important actor in the history of the cinema“.

Grant was a favorite of Hitchcock, who called him “the only actor I ever loved in my whole life”.  

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Besides Suspicion, Grant appeared in the Hitchcock classics Notorious (1946), To Catch a Thief(1955), and North by Northwest (1959). Biographer Patrick McGilligan wrote that in 1965 Hitchcock asked Grant to star in Torn Curtain (1966) only to learn that Grant had decided to retire after making one more film, Walk, Don’t Run (1966); 

Paul Newman was cast instead, oppositeJulie Andrews.   Producers Broccoli and Saltzman originally sought Cary Grant for the role of James Bond in Dr. No but discarded the idea as Grant would be committed to only one feature film and the producers decided to go after someone who could be part of a franchise.

In the mid-1950s, Grant formed his own production company, Granart Productions, and produced a number of films distributed by Universal, such as Operation Petticoat (1959), Indiscreet (1958),That Touch of Mink (co-starring with Doris Day, 1962), and Father Goose (1964). In 1963, he appeared opposite Audrey Hepburn in Charade. His last feature film was Walk, Don’t Run three years later, with Samantha Eggar and Jim Hutton.

Grant was the first actor to “go independent” by not renewing his studio contract, effectively leaving the studio system,  which almost completely controlled what an actor could or could not do. In this way, Grant was able to control every aspect of his career, at the risk of not working because no particular studio had an interest in his career long term.

He decided which films he was going to appear in, often had personal choice of directors and co-stars, and at times even negotiated a share of the gross revenue, something uncommon at the time. Grant received more than $700,000 for his 10% of the gross for To Catch a Thief while Hitchcock received less than $50,000 for directing and producing it.

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Grant was nominated for two Academy Awards, for Penny Serenade (1941) and None But the Lonely Heart (1944), but never won a competitive Oscar; he received a special Academy Award for Lifetime Achievement in 1970. Accepting the Best Original Screenplay Oscar in 1965, Father Goose co-writer Peter Stone had quipped, “My thanks to Cary Grant, who keeps winning these things for other people.” In 1981, Grant was accorded the Kennedy Center Honors.

Grant poked fun at himself with statements such as “Everyone wants to be Cary Grant—even I want to be Cary Grant”, and in ad-lib lines—such as in the film His Girl Friday, saying, “I never had so much fun since Archie Leach died”. In Arsenic and Old Lace (1944), a gravestone is seen bearing the name Archie Leach. According to a famous story now believed to be apocryphal, after seeing a telegram from a magazine editor to his agent asking “How old Cary Grant?” Grant reportedly responded with “Old Cary Grant fine. How you?

Cary Grant retired from the screen at 62 when his daughter Jennifer was born, in order to focus on bringing her up and to provide a sense of permanency and stability in her life.

While bringing up his daughter, he archived artifacts of her childhood and adolescence in a bank-quality room-sized vault he had installed in the house.

His daughter attributed this meticulous collection to the fact that artifacts of his own childhood had been destroyed during the Luftwaffe’s bombing of Bristol in the Second World War (an event that also claimed the lives of his uncle, aunt, and cousin as well as the cousin’s husband and grandson), and he may have wanted to prevent her from experiencing a similar loss.

Although Grant had retired from the screen, he remained active.

CARY GRANT - MARTIN LANDAU

CARY GRANT – MARTIN LANDAU

In the late 1960s, he accepted a position on the board of directors at Fabergé. By all accounts this position was not honorary, as some had assumed; Grant regularly attended meetings and his mere appearance at a product launch would almost certainly guarantee its success. The position also permitted use of a private plane, which Grant could use to fly to see his daughter wherever her mother, Dyan Cannon, was working.

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He later joined the boards of Hollywood Park, the Academy of Magical Arts (The Magic Castle, Hollywood, California), Western Airlines (now Delta Air Lines), andMGM.

He was a keen motoring enthusiast and, like many other Hollywood stars of the era, owned many notable cars. One of the first he owned was a 1929 Cadillac Cabriolet. His love of Cadillacs never waned and he later purchased a Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz. Other cars that he owned included an MG Magnette and a Sunbeam Alpine series one roadster.

In the last few years of his life, Grant undertook tours of the United States in a one-man show, A Conversation with Cary Grant, in which he would show clips from his films and answer audience questions. Grant was preparing for a performance at the Adler Theatre in DavenportIowa, on the afternoon of November 29, 1986, when he sustained a cerebral hemorrhage (he had previously suffered a stroke in October 1984). His wife did not know what was going on and she went to a local pharmacy to get aspirin. He died at 11:22 p.m.  in St. Luke’s Hospital at the age of 82.

The bulk of his estate, worth millions of dollars, went to his fifth wife, Barbara Harris, and his daughter, Jennifer Grant

In 2001, a statue of Grant was erected in Millennium Square, a regenerated area next to Bristol Harbour in his city of birth, Bristol.

In November 2005, Grant came in first in the “The 50 Greatest Movie Stars of All Time” list by Premiere magazine.  Richard Schickel, the film critic, said about Grant: “He’s the best star actor there ever was in the movies.

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CARY GRANT – ROGER MOORE

Filmography[edit]

Year Film Role Notes
1932 This Is the Night Stephen With Lili DamitaCharles Ruggles, and Thelma Todd
Sinners in the Sun Ridgeway With Carole Lombard and Chester Morris
Singapore Sue First Sailor Musical Comedy short subject
Merrily We Go to Hell Charlie Baxter UK title: Merrily We Go to _____With Sylvia Sidney and Fredric March
Devil and the Deep Lieutenant Jaeckel With Tallulah Bankhead and Gary Cooper
Blonde Venus Nick Townsend With Marlene Dietrich
Hot Saturday Romer Sheffield With Nancy Carroll and Edward Woods
Madame Butterfly Lieutenant B.F. Pinkerton With Sylvia Sidney and Charles Ruggles
1933 She Done Him Wrong Capt. Cummings With Mae West and Noah Beery, Sr.
The Woman Accused Jeffrey Baxter With Nancy Carroll
The Eagle and the Hawk Henry Crocker With Fredric March and Carole Lombard
Gambling Ship Ace Corbin With Jack La Rue and Glenda Farrell
I’m No Angel Jack Clayton With Mae West
Alice in Wonderland The Mock Turtle With W. C. Fields and Gary Cooper
1934 Thirty-Day Princess Porter Madison III With Sylvia Sidney and Edward Arnold
Born to Be Bad Malcolm Trevor With Loretta Young(Heavily censored by the Hayes Office)
Kiss and Make-Up Dr. Maurice Lamar With Helen Mack and the WAMPAS Baby Stars of 1934
Ladies Should Listen Julian De Lussac With Frances Drake and Edward Everett Horton
1935 Enter Madame Gerald Fitzgerald With top-billed Elissa Landi
Wings in the Dark Ken Gordon With top-billed Myrna Loy
The Last Outpost Michael Andrews With Claude Rains
Sylvia Scarlett Jimmy Monkley Directed by George CukorWith Katharine Hepburn
1936 Big Brown Eyes Det. Sgt. Danny Barr With Joan Bennett and Walter Pidgeon
Suzy Andre With Jean Harlow and Franchot Tone
The Amazing Quest of Ernest Bliss Ernest Bliss US title: Romance and RichesAlt title: The Amazing Adventure
Wedding Present Charlie With Joan Bennett
1937 When You’re in Love Jimmy Hudson UK title: For You AloneWith Grace Moore
Topper George Kerby With Constance Bennett
The Toast of New York Nicholas “Nick” Boyd With Edward Arnold and Jack Oakie
The Awful Truth Jerry Warriner Directed by Leo McCarey
With Irene Dunne and Ralph Bellamy
Introduced the “Cary Grant persona”
1938 Bringing up Baby Dr. David Huxley Directed by Howard Hawks
With Katharine Hepburn and Charles Ruggles
Holiday John “Johnny” Case Directed by George Cukor
With Katharine Hepburn
UK title: Free to Live
1939 Gunga Din Sgt. Archibald Cutter Directed by George Stevens
With Victor McLaglen and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.
Only Angels Have Wings Geoff Carter Directed by Howard Hawks
With Jean ArthurThomas Mitchell and Rita Hayworth
In Name Only Alec Walker With Carole Lombard and Charles Coburn
1940 His Girl Friday Walter Burns Directed by Howard Hawks
Remake of The Front Page
With Rosalind Russell and Ralph Bellamy
My Favorite Wife Nick Co-written by Leo McCarey
Directed by Garson Kanin
With Irene Dunne and Gail Patrick
The Howards of Virginia Matt Howard UK title: The Tree of Liberty
With Martha Scott
The Philadelphia Story C.K. Dexter Haven With Katharine Hepburn and James Stewart
1941 Penny Serenade Roger Adams Nominated—Academy Award for Best Actor
Directed by George Stevens
With Irene Dunne and Edgar Buchanan
Suspicion Johnnie Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
With Joan Fontaine
1942 The Talk of the Town Leopold Dilg aka Joseph With Ronald Colman and Jean Arthur
Once Upon a Honeymoon Patrick “Pat” O’Toole Directed by Leo McCarey
With Ginger Rogers
1943 Mr. Lucky Joe Adams/Joe Bascopolous With Laraine Day and Charles Bickford
Destination Tokyo Capt. Cassidy With John Garfield and Dane Clark
1944 Once Upon a Time Jerry Flynn With Janet Blair
Arsenic and Old Lace Mortimer Brewster With Priscilla Lane and Peter Lorre
None But the Lonely Heart Ernie Mott Nominated—Academy Award for Best ActorWritten and directed by Clifford Odets
With Ethel Barrymore
1946 Without Reservations Himself (cameo) With Claudette Colbert and John Wayne
Night and Day Cole Porter Directed by Michael Curtiz
Notorious T.R. Devlin Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
With Ingrid Bergman and Claude Rains
1947 The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer Dick UK title: Bachelor KnightWith Myrna Loy and Shirley Temple
The Bishop’s Wife Dudley With Loretta Young and David Niven
1948 Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House Jim Blandings With Myrna Loy and Melvyn Douglas
Every Girl Should Be Married Dr. Madison W. Brown With Betsy Drake
1949 I Was a Male War Bride Capt. Henri Rochard UK title: You Can’t Sleep Here
With Ann Sheridan
1950 Crisis Dr. Eugene Norland Ferguson With Jose Ferrer
1951 People Will Talk Dr. Noah Praetorius With Jeanne Crain
1952 Room for One More George “Poppy” Rose With Betsy Drake
Monkey Business Dr. Barnaby Fulton Directed by Howard Hawks
With Ginger Rogers and Marilyn Monroe
1953 Dream Wife Clemson Reade With Deborah Kerr and Walter Pidgeon
1955 To Catch a Thief John Robie Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
With Grace Kelly
1957 The Pride and the Passion Anthony With Frank Sinatra and Sophia Loren
An Affair to Remember Nickie Ferrante A same-script remake of Love Affair (1939 film), both directed by Leo McCareyWith Deborah Kerr
Kiss Them for Me Cmdr. Andy Crewson Directed by Stanley Donen
With Jayne Mansfield and Suzy Parker
1958 Indiscreet Philip Adams Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Directed by Stanley Donen
With Ingrid Bergman
Houseboat Tom Winters With Sophia Loren
1959 North by Northwest Roger O. Thornhill Directed by Alfred HitchcockWith Eva Marie SaintJames Mason and Martin Landau
Famous scene of Grant being chased by a biplane
Operation Petticoat Lt. Cmdr. Matt T. Sherman Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
With Dina Merrill and Arthur O’Connell
1960 The Grass Is Greener Victor Rhyall, Earl Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or ComedyDirected by Stanley Donen
With Deborah KerrRobert Mitchum and Jean Simmons
1962 That Touch of Mink Philip Shayne Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Directed by Delbert Mann
With Doris Day and Gig Young
1963 Charade Peter Joshua / Alexander Dyle / Adam Canfield / Brian Cruikshank Nominated—BAFTA Award for Best Foreign Actor
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Directed by Stanley Donen
With Audrey HepburnWalter Matthau and James Coburn
1964 Father Goose Walter Christopher Eckland Directed by Ralph Nelson
With Leslie Caron and Trevor Howard
1966 Walk, Don’t Run Sir William Rutland With Samantha EggarRemake of The More the Merrier

 CARY GRANT : Here also another article

A lire aussi ( A french article)

http://www.radiosatellite2.com/archives/2014/07/06/30199855.html

 

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ERIC CLAPTON

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AMERICAN GRAFFITI


American Graffiti is a 1973 American coming-of-age comedy-drama film directed and co-written by George Lucas starring Richard Dreyfuss, Ron Howard, Paul Le Mat, Harrison Ford, Charles Martin Smith, Cindy Williams, Candy Clark, Mackenzie Phillips, Bo Hopkins, and Wolfman Jack. Suzanne Somers and Joe Spano also appear in the film.

 

Set in Modesto, California in 1962, the film is a study of the cruising and rock and roll cultures popular among the post–World War II baby boom generation. The film is told in a series of vignettes, telling the story of a group of teenagers and their adventures over a single night.

The genesis of American Graffiti was in Lucas‘ own teenage years in early 1960s Modesto. He was unsuccessful in pitching the concept to financiers and distributors but found favor at Universal Pictures after United Artists, 20th Century Fox, Columbia Pictures, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Warner Bros., and Paramount Pictures turned him down. Filming was initially set to take place in San Rafael, California, but the production crew was denied permission to shoot beyond a second day.

 

American Graffiti premiered on August 2, 1973 at the Locarno International Film Festival in Switzerland and was released on August 11, 1973 in the United States. The film received widespread critical acclaim and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. Produced on a $777,000 budget, it has become one of the most profitable films of all time. Since its initial release, American Graffiti has garnered an estimated return of well over $200 million in box office gross and home video sales, not including merchandising. In 1995, the United States Library of Congress deemed the film “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” and selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry.

 

In early September 1962 in Modesto, California, on the last evening of summer vacation, recent high school graduates and longtime friends, Curt Henderson and Steve Bolander, meet John Milner, the drag-racing king of the town, and Terry “The Toad” Fields in the parking lot of the local Mel’s Drive-In diner. Curt and Steve are scheduled to travel the next morning to Northeastern United States to start college. Despite receiving a $2,000 scholarship from the local Moose Lodge, Curt has second thoughts about leaving Modesto. Steve gives Toad his 1958 Chevrolet Impala to watch while he’s away at college until he returns at Christmas. Steve’s girlfriend, Laurie, who is also Curt’s sister, arrives in her car. Steve suggests to Laurie, who is already glum about him going to college, that they see other people while he is away in order to “strengthen” their relationship. Though not openly upset, she is displeased with his proposal which affects their interactions the rest of the evening.

 

Curt accompanies Steve, last year’s high school student class president, and Laurie, the current head cheerleader, to the back-to-high-school sock hop. In one story line, Curt is desperate to find a beautiful blonde girl driving a white 1956 Ford Thunderbird that he sees en route to the dance: at a stoplight, she appears to say “I love you” before disappearing around the corner. After leaving the hop, Curt is coerced by a group of greasers (“The Pharaohs”) to participate in an initiation rite that involves hooking a chain to a police car and ripping out its back axle. The Pharaohs tell Curt that “The Blonde” is a trophy wife or prostitute, but he refuses to believe either.

Determined to get a message to the blonde girl, Curt drives to the local radio station to ask DJ Wolfman Jack, who is omnipresent on the car radios, to announce a message for the blonde girl. Inside the radio station, Curt encounters a bearded man who tells him that the voice of The Wolfman is pre-taped from afar.

The man still accepts the message from Curt to see what he could do. As he is leaving the station, Curt sees the man talking into the microphone and hears the voice of The Wolfman, and realizes the man is the actual DJ himself.

 

Sure enough, The Wolfman eventually reads the message on the radio for “The Blonde” to meet Curt or call him at a number which happens to be a telephone booth. Curt waits by the telephone booth and early the next morning, he is awakened by the phone ringing. It turns out to be “The Blonde” who says she knows him and maybe she would see him cruising the coming night. Curt replies probably not, intimating that he decided to go to college and will be leaving that morning.

The Toad, in Steve’s car, and John, in his yellow 1932 Ford Deuce Coupé hot rod, cruise the strip of Modesto. Toad, who is normally socially inept with girls, successfully picks up a flirtatious, and somewhat rebellious, girl named Debbie. John inadvertently picks up Carol, an annoying 12-year-old who seems fond of him. Another drag racer, the handsome and arrogant Bob Falfa, is searching out John in order to challenge him to a race.

Steve and Laurie have a series of arguments and make-ups through the evening. They finally split and, as the story lines intertwine, Bob Falfa picks up Laurie in his black 1955 Chevrolet One-Fifty Coupé. Bob finally finds John and goads him into racing. A parade of cars follow them to “Paradise Road” to watch the race. Laurie rides shotgun with Bob as Toad starts the race. As Bob begins taking a lead in the race, he loses control of the car when a front tire blows, and the car plunges into a ditch and rolls over. Steve and John leap out of their cars and rush to the wreck as a dazed Bob and Laurie stagger out of the car before it explodes. Distraught, Laurie grips Steve tightly and begs him not to leave her. He assures her that he will stay in Modesto.

At the airfield in the morning, Curt says goodbye to his parents, his sister Laurie, Steve, John and The Toad. As the plane takes off, Curt, gazing out of the window, sees the white Ford Thunderbird belonging to the mysterious blonde driving down a country road.

An on-screen epilogue reveals that

John is killed by a drunk driver in December 1964,

Toad is reported missing in action near An Lộc in December 1965,

Steve is an insurance agent in Modesto, California,

and

Curt is a writer living in Canada.

 

Richard Dreyfuss as Curt Henderson

Ron Howard as Steve Bolander

Paul Le Mat as John Milner

Charles Martin Smith as Terry “The Toad” Fields

Cindy Williams as Laurie Henderson

Candy Clark as Debbie Dunham

Mackenzie Phillips as Carol Morrison

Wolfman Jack as himself

Bo Hopkins as Joe Young

Manuel Padilla, Jr. as Carlos

Harrison Ford as Bob Falfa

Lynne Marie Stewart as Bobbie Tucker

Terry McGovern as Mr. Wolfe

Kathleen Quinlan as Peg

Scott Beach as Mr. Gordon

Susan Richardson as Judy

Kay Lenz as Jane

Joe Spano as Vic

Debralee Scott as Falfa’s Girl

Suzanne Somers as “The Blonde” in T-Bird

American Graffiti

 

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Befikre : great Indian movie


Befikre (English: Carefree) is a 2016 Indian Hindi-language romantic drama film written, directed, and produced by Aditya Chopra under his Yash Raj Films banner.

 

befikre

It features Ranveer Singh and Vaani Kapoor in the lead roles.  The film was shot over a period of 50 days in Paris and Mumbai.  It released worldwide on 9 December 2016.

 

The film’s songs has been composed by Vishal-Shekhar and produced by Mikey McCleary. Mikey McCleary also composed the background score of the movie.

Befikre is a story that celebrates being carefree in love. A quintessential Delhi boy Dharam (Ranveer Singh) comes to Paris for work in search of an adventure.

Just when he was about to embark on this journey of his life he bumps into a wild, free spirited, French born Indian girl Shyra (Vaani Kapoor).

A feisty romance ensues between the two in which both of their personalities- one being an equal match for the other are tested to the limit. Battling their ups and downs, both realize that love is a leap of faith that can only be taken by those who dare to love.

 

 

 

Sources Wikipedia

 

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THE A TEAM & GEORGE PEPPARD


ARTICLE IN ENGLISH FIRST

ARTICLE IN FRENCH AFTER

The A-Team is an American action-adventure television series that ran from 1983 to 1987 about a fictitious former United States Army Special Forces unit whose members, after being court-martialed “for a crime they didn’t commit”, escaped from military prison and, while still on the run, worked as soldiers of fortune. A feature film based on the series was released by 20th Century Fox in June 2010.

 

THE A TEAM 1

 

The A-Team was created by writers and producers Stephen J. Cannell and Frank Lupo at the behest of Brandon Tartikoff, NBC’s Entertainment president. Cannell was fired from ABC in the early 1980s, after failing to produce a hit show for the network, and was hired by NBC;

His first project was The A-Team. Brandon Tartikoff pitched the series to Cannell as a combination of The Dirty Dozen, Mission Impossible, The Magnificent Seven, Mad Max and Hill Street Blues, with “Mr. T driving the car”.

The A-Team was not generally expected to become a hit, although Stephen J. Cannell has said that George Peppard suggested it would be a huge hit “before we ever turned on a camera”.

The show became very popular; the first regular episode, which aired after Super Bowl XVII on January 30, 1983, reached 26.4% of the television audience, placing fourth in the top 10 Nielsen-rated shows.

The A-Team was always portrayed as acting on the side of good and helping the oppressed. Cannell was known for having a particular skill at capitalizing on momentary cultural trends, such as the helicopters, machine guns, cartoonish violence, and joyful militarism of this series, which are now recognizable as trademarks of popular entertainment in the 1980s as seen in the TV shows Magnum, P.I. and Airwolf as well as the films Rambo: First Blood Part II and Top Gun.

The show remains prominent in popular culture for its cartoonish, over-the-top violence (in which people were seldom seriously hurt), formulaic episodes, its characters’ ability to form weaponry and vehicles out of old parts, and its distinctive theme tune.

The show boosted the career of Mr. T, who portrayed the character of B. A. Baracus, around whom the show was initially conceived.  Some of the show’s catchphrases, such as “I love it when a plan comes together”, “Hannibal’s on the jazz”, and “I ain’t gettin’ on no plane!” have also made their way onto T-shirts and other merchandise.

The show’s name comes from the “A-Teams”, the nickname coined for U.S. Special Forces’ Operational Detachments Alpha (ODA) during the Vietnam War, although this connection was never referenced on-screen.

In a 2003 Yahoo! survey of 1,000 television viewers, The A-Team was voted the one “oldie” television show viewers would most like to see revived, beating out such popular television series from the 1980s as The Dukes of Hazzard and Knight Rider.

“In 1972, a crack commando unit was sent to prison by a military court for a crime they didn’t commit. These men promptly escaped from a maximum security stockade to the Los Angeles underground. Today, still wanted by the government, they survive as soldiers of fortune. If you have a problem, if no one else can help, and if you can find them, maybe you can hire… the A-Team.”

The A-Team is a naturally episodic show, with few overarching stories, except the characters’ continuing motivation to clear their names, with few references to events in past episodes and a recognizable and steady episode structure.

In describing the ratings drop that occurred during the show’s fourth season, reviewer Gold Burt points to this structure as being a leading cause for the decreased popularity “because the same basic plot had been used over and over again for the past four seasons with the same predictable outcome”.

Similarly, reporter Adrian Lee called the plots “stunningly simple” in a 2006 article for The Express (UK newspaper), citing such recurring elements “as BA’s fear of flying, and outlandish finales when the team fashioned weapons from household items”.

The show became emblematic of this kind of “fit-for-TV warfare” due to its depiction of high-octane combat scenes, with lethal weapons, wherein the participants (with the notable exception of General Fulbright) are never killed and rarely seriously injured (see also On-screen violence section).

As the television ratings of The A-Team fell dramatically during the fourth season, the format was changed for the show’s final season in 1986–87 in a bid to win back viewers.

After years on the run from the authorities, the A-Team is finally apprehended by the military. General Hunt Stockwell, a mysterious CIA operative played by Robert Vaughn, propositions them to work for him, whereupon he will arrange for their pardons upon successful completion of several suicide missions. In order to do so, the A-Team must first escape from their captivity.

With the help of a new character, Frankie “Dishpan Man” Santana, Stockwell fakes their deaths before a military firing squad. The new status of the A-Team, no longer working for themselves, remained for the duration of the fifth season while Eddie Velez and Robert Vaughn received star billing along with the principal cast.

 

Mister T

Mr T

Premiere Of Walt Disney Animation Studios' "Bolt" - Arrivals

Mr T

The missions that the team had to perform in season five were somewhat reminiscent of Mission: Impossible, and based more around political espionage than beating local thugs, also usually taking place in foreign countries, including successfully overthrowing an island dictator, the rescue of a scientist from East Germany, and recovering top secret Star Wars defense information from Soviet hands.

These changes proved unsuccessful with viewers, however, and ratings continued to decline. Only 13 episodes aired in the fifth season. In what was supposed to be the final episode, “The Grey Team” (although “Without Reservations” was broadcast on NBC as the last first-run episode in March 1987), Hannibal, after being misled by Stockwell one time too many, tells him that the team will no longer work for him.

At the end, the team discusses what they were going to do if they get their pardon, and it is implied that they would continue doing what they were doing as the A-Team. The character of Howling Mad Murdock can be seen in the final scene wearing a T-shirt that says, “fini”.

During the Vietnam War, the A-Team were members of the 5th Special Forces Group (see Season 1, Episode 10, “West Coast Turnaround”).

In Season 2, Episode 4, “Bad Time on the Border”, Colonel John “Hannibal” Smith, portrayed by George Peppard, indicated that the A-Team were “ex–Green Berets”.

During the Vietnam War, the A-Team’s commanding officer, Colonel Morrison, gave them orders to rob the Bank of Hanoi to help bring the war to an end. They succeeded in their mission, but on their return to base four days after the end of the war, they discovered that Morrison had been killed by the Viet Cong, and that his headquarters had been burned to the ground.

This meant that the proof that the A-Team members were acting under orders had been destroyed. They were arrested, and imprisoned at Fort Bragg, from which they quickly escaped before standing trial.

The origin of the A-Team is directly linked to the Vietnam War, during which the team formed.

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The show’s introduction in the first four seasons mentions this, accompanied by images of soldiers coming out of a helicopter in an area resembling a forest or jungle.

Besides this, The A-Team would occasionally feature an episode in which the team came across an old ally or enemy from those war days.

For example, the first season’s final episode “A Nice Place To Visit” revolved around the team traveling to a small town to honor a fallen comrade and end up avenging his death, and in season two’s “Recipe For Heavy Bread”, a chance encounter leads the team to meet both the POW cook who helped them during the war, and the American officer who sold his unit out.

An article in the New Statesman (UK) published shortly after the premiere of The A-Team in the United Kingdom, also pointed out The A-Team’s connection to the Vietnam War, characterizing it as the representation of the idealization of the Vietnam War, and an example of the war slowly becoming accepted and assimilated into American culture.

One of the team’s primary antagonists, Col. Roderick Decker (Lance LeGault), had his past linked back to the Vietnam War, in which he and Hannibal had come to fisticuffs in “the DOOM Club” (Da Nang Open Officers’ Mess).

 

At other times, members of the team would refer back to a certain tactic used during the War, which would be relevant to the team’s present predicament. Often, Hannibal would refer to such a tactic, after which the other members of the team would complain about its failure during the War. This was also used to refer to some of Face’s past accomplishments in scamming items for the team, such as in the first season episode “Holiday In The Hills”, in which Murdock fondly remembers Face being able to secure a ’53 Cadillac while in the Vietnam jungle.

The team’s ties to the Vietnam War were referenced again in the fourth season finale, “The Sound of Thunder”, in which the team is introduced to Tia (Tia Carrere), a war orphan and daughter of fourth season antagonist General Fulbright. Returning to Vietnam, Fulbright is shot in the back and gives his last words as he dies.

The 2006 documentary Bring Back The A-Team joked that the scene lasted seven and a half minutes, but his death actually took a little over a minute. His murderer, a Vietnamese colonel, is killed in retaliation. Tia then returns with the team to the United States (see also: casting).

This episode is notable for having one of the show’s few truly serious dramatic moments, with each team member privately reminiscing on their war experiences, intercut with news footage from the war with Barry McGuire’s Eve of Destruction playing in the background.

The show’s ties to the Vietnam War are fully dealt with in the opening arc of the fifth season, dubbed “The Revolution”/”The Court-Martial”, in which the team is finally court-martialed for the robbery of the bank of Hanoi.

The character of Roderick Decker makes a return on the witness stand, and various newly introduced characters from the A-Team’s past also make appearances. The team, after a string of setbacks, decides to plead guilty to the crime and they are sentenced to be executed. They escape this fate and come to work for a General Hunt Stockwell, leading into the remainder of the fifth season.

The A-Team revolves around the four members of a former commando outfit, now mercenaries.

 

Their leader is Lieutenant Colonel/Colonel John “Hannibal” Smith (George Peppard), whose plans tend to be unorthodox but effective.

Lieutenant Templeton Peck (Dirk Benedict; Tim Dunigan appeared as Templeton Peck in the pilot), usually called “Face” or “Faceman”, is a smooth-talking con man who serves as the team’s appropriator of vehicles and other useful items, as well as the team’s second-in-command.

The team’s pilot is Captain H.M. “Howling Mad” Murdock (Dwight Schultz), who has been declared insane and lives in a Veterans’ Administration mental institution for the show’s first four seasons.

Finally, there is the team’s strong man, mechanic and Sergeant First Class Bosco Albert “B.A.”, or “Bad Attitude”, Baracus (Mr. T).

It is unclear to which U.S. Army unit the four belonged. A patch on Hannibal’s uniform in the season 1 episode “A Nice Place To Visit” indicates they belonged to the 101st Airborne division in Vietnam, but the patch was replaced by the 1st Air Cavalry Division patch in the Season 5 episode “Trial by Fire”. In the Season 1 episode “West Coast Turnaround”, Hannibal stated they were with the 5th Special Forces Group.

Then, in Season 2 episode “Bad Time on the Border”, Hannibal refers to his friends as “ex-Green Berets”. Though the name they have adopted comes from the “A-Teams”, the nickname coined for Special Forces Operational Detachments Alpha, these detachments usually consisted of twelve members; whether the four were considered a “detachment” of their own or had once had eight compatriots who were killed in action was never revealed.

For its first season and the first half of the second season, the team was assisted by reporter Amy Amanda Allen (Melinda Culea).

In the second half of the second season, Allen was replaced by fellow reporter Tawnia Baker (Marla Heasley). The character of Tia (Tia Carrere), a Vietnam war orphan now living in the United States, was meant to join the Team in the fifth season, but she was replaced by Frankie Santana (Eddie Velez), who served as the team’s special effects expert. Velez was added to the opening credits of the fifth season after its second episode.

During their adventures, the A-Team was constantly met by opposition from the Military Police. In the show’s first season, the MPs were led by Colonel Francis Lynch (William Lucking), but he was replaced for the second, third, and earlier fourth season by Colonel Roderick Decker (Lance LeGault) and his aide Captain Crane (Carl Franklin).

Lynch returned for one episode in the show’s third season (“Showdown!”) but was not seen after. Decker was also briefly replaced by a Colonel Briggs (Charles Napier) in the third season for one episode (“Fire!”) when LeGault was unavailable, but returned shortly after. For the latter portion of the show’s fourth season, the team was hunted by General Harlan “Bull” Fulbright (Jack Ging), who would later hire the A-Team to find Tia in the season four finale, during which Fulbright was killed.

 

The fifth season introduced General Hunt Stockwell (Robert Vaughn) who, while serving as the team’s primary antagonist, was also the team’s boss and joined them on several missions. He was often assisted by Carla (Judith Ledford, sometimes credited as Judy Ledford).

Character traits

John “Hannibal” Smith: Master of Disguise. His most used disguise (although not onscreen) is Mr. Lee, the dry cleaner. This is one of the final parts of the client screening process, as he tells the client where to go in order to make full contact with the A-Team. He dresses most often in a white safari jacket and black leather gloves. He also is constantly seen smoking a cigar. Hannibal carries either a Browning Hi-Power, Colt M1911A1 or a Smith & Wesson Model 39 as a sidearm, most often “Mexican Carried” although he uses a holster when on missions. His catchphrase is “I love it when a plan comes together”. Often said, usually by B.A., to be “on the jazz” when in the fury of completing a mission.

Templeton “Faceman” Peck: Master of the Persuasive Arts. The team’s scrounger, he can get virtually anything he sets his mind to, usually exploiting women with sympathy-appeal and flirtation. However, he is not without integrity, as stated by Murdock in the episode “Family Reunion”: “He would rip the shirt off his back for you, and then scam one for himself.” Faceman is also the A-Team’s accountant. He dresses suavely, often appearing in suits. Faceman carries a Colt Lawman Mk III revolver for protection, and drives a white Corvette with orange trim.

Bosco Albert “B.A.” (Bad Attitude) Baracus: The muscle for the A-Team, Able to perform amazing feats of strength. He is also the team’s mechanic. B.A. affects a dislike for Murdock, calling him a “crazy fool”, but his true feelings of friendship are revealed when he prevents Murdock from drowning in his desire to live like a fish. B.A. also has a deep fear of flying, and the others usually have to trick and/or knock him out in order to get him on a plane.

It is very rare that B.A is awake while flying, and even rarer for him actually to consent to it. However, he then goes into a catatonic state. B.A generally wears overalls and leopard or tiger print shirts in the early seasons, then later wears a green jumpsuit in the later seasons.

 

 

He is almost always seen with about 50 pounds of gold necklaces and rings on every finger, and also wears a weightlifting belt. Baracus’s hair is always styled in a mohawk-like cut. He drives a customized black GMC van, which is the team’s usual mode of transport.

H.M “Howling Mad” Murdock: The A-Team’s pilot, he can fly any kind of aircraft with extreme precision. However, due to a helicopter crash in Vietnam, Murdock apparently went insane. He lives in a Veterans’ Hospital in the mental wing. Whenever the rest of the team requires a pilot, they have to break him out of the hospital, generally using Faceman to do so. In Seasons 1-4, Murdock has a different pet, imaginary friend, or persona in each episode. Whenever one of his pets or imaginary friends is killed by an enemy, Murdock snaps and takes revenge (but never kills).

Many times, when B.A is mad at Murdock for being crazy, Hannibal will side with Murdock in a sympathetic way. Once he is discharged from the hospital in Season 5, Murdock has a different job each episode. Essentially, B.A. and Murdock get on each other’s nerves. Murdock usually wears a leather flight jacket, a baseball cap, and basketball sneakers.

Casting

Although the part of Face was written by Frank Lupo and Stephen J. Cannell with Dirk Benedict in mind, NBC insisted that the part should be played by another actor, instead.

Therefore, in the pilot, Face was portrayed by Tim Dunigan, who was later replaced by Dirk Benedict, with the comment that Dunigan was “too tall and too young”.

According to Dunigan: “I look even younger on camera than I am. So it was difficult to accept me as a veteran of the Vietnam War, which ended when I was a sophomore in high school.”

Carrere was intended to join the principal cast of the show in its fifth season after appearing in the season four finale, providing a tie to the team’s inception during the war. Unfortunately for this plan, Carrere was under contract to General Hospital, which prevented her from joining The A-Team. Her character was abruptly dropped as a result.

According to Mr. T’s account in Bring Back… The A-Team in 2006, the role of B. A. Baracus was written specifically for him. This is corroborated by Stephen J. Cannell’s own account of the initial concept proposed by Tartikoff.

James Coburn, who co-starred in The Magnificent Seven, was considered for the role of Hannibal in The A-Team, while George Peppard (Hannibal) was the original consideration for the role of Vin (played by Steve McQueen instead) in The Magnificent Seven.

Robert Vaughn, of course, actually appeared in the film.

According to Dirk Benedict, Robert Vaughn was actually added to the cast in season 5 because of his friendship with the notoriously difficult George Peppard. It was hoped that Vaughn would help ease worsening tensions between Peppard and Mr. T.

 

 

 

 

 

L’Agence tous risques (The A-Team) est une série télévisée américaine en 98 épisodes de 45 minutes, créée par Frank Lupo et Stephen J. Cannell, diffusée entre le 23 janvier 19831 et le 8 mars 1987 sur le réseau NBC.

En France, les saisons 1 à 4 ont été diffusées à partir du 1er juillet 1984 sur TF12. Diffusion de la saison 5 inédite du 5 février 19963 au 16 février 19964 sur TF1. Rediffusion intégrale du 6 juillet 20025 au 8 mai 20046 sur M6. Puis en 20037 sur 13e rue, de juin 2010 à août 2013 sur TMC ainsi qu’à partir du 16 décembre 2013 jusqu’en juillet 2014 sur HD1 et depuis le 19 février 2015 sur Paris Première.

Le 16 juin 2010, un film du même nom est commercialisé par 20th Century Fox8.

 

 

 

 

Pendant la guerre du Viêt Nam, le chef hiérarchique de l’Agence tous risque, le général Morrison, leur a donné l’ordre de voler la banque de Hanoï afin de précipiter la fin de la guerre. La mission est un succès, mais quatre jours après la fin de la guerre, ils retrouvent le général assassiné par les Viet Cong, le quartier général étant entièrement brûlé. Par conséquent, aucune preuve indiquant que l’Agence tous risques agissait sur ordre n’existe. Les membres passent alors devant une cour de justice militaire, celle-ci les condamnant à la prison. Incarcérés aux États-Unis, ils s’évadent rapidement et mènent désormais une vie de mercenaires au service « de la veuve et de l’orphelin », combattant les injustices locales.

Distribution

Acteurs principaux

George Peppard  : colonel John « Hannibal » Smith

Dirk Benedict  : lieutenant Peck « Futé » Templeton (VO : « Face ») (à partir de l’épisode 2)

Dwight Schultz  : capitaine Henry « Looping » Murdock (VO : « Howling Mad »)

Mister T.  : sergent Bosco Albert « Barracuda » Baracus (VO : « B. A. »

Melinda Culea  : Amy Amanda « Triple A » Allen (saisons 1 et 2)

Robert Vaughn  : général Hunt Stockwell (saison 5)

Eddie Velez  : Frankie Santana (saison 5)

Tim Dunigan  : lieutenant Templeton « Futé » Peck (VO : « Face ») (épisode pilote uniquement)

 

 

L’Agence tous risques a été créée par les producteurs américains Stephen J. Cannell et Frank Lupo à la demande du président du réseau NBC, Brandon Tartikoff.

Stephen J. Cannell a été renvoyé de chez ABC au début des années 1980, après avoir échoué dans sa tentative de produire une émission à succès pour la chaîne. Cannell est engagé à la NBC et son premier projet était de créer L’Agence tous risques.

Brandon Tartikoff considère l’émission comme un mélange de Les Douze Salopards, Mission Impossible, Les Sept Mercenaires, Mad Max et Capitaine Furillo, avec « Mr. T conduisant l’engin. »

L’Agence tous risques n’était, au départ, pas considérée comme une future série à succès, mais Stephen J. Cannell explique que George Peppard était persuadé qu’elle deviendrait un succès « avant même que l’on allume la caméra »13. L’émission se popularise ; le premier épisode, diffusée juste après le Super Bowl XVII le 30 janvier 1983, atteint 26,4 % de l’audience sur la chaîne, le classant ainsi quatrième sur l’Échelle de Nielsen.

Le titre original de la série vient des « Special Forces » (SF, « forces spéciales »), que les américains surnomment A-Teams et populairement connues sous le surnom des « bérets verts » (green berets), qui sont une des forces spéciales de l’US Army.

Spécialisées dans la guerre non conventionnelle, les actions commandos et la formation de troupes alliées, elles ont, depuis leur création au début des années 1950, été engagées dans la plupart des conflits impliquant les États-Unis.

La série s’inscrit dans un contexte particulier aux États-Unis, qui voit apparaître divers avatars de vétérans de la guerre du Viêt Nam, comme le détective privé Thomas Magnum ou le sergent T.J. Hooker.

 

 

Rapatriés après la fin officielle de la guerre, en 1975, de très nombreux vétérans américains ont éprouvé de grandes difficultés à se réintégrer dans une société qui ne les reconnaissait plus.

D’une part, les traumatismes physiques et psychologiques des soldats les rendaient extrêmement fragiles, d’autre part, à la frustration patriotique de la population s’est ajouté le rejet de soldats dont l’opinion publique découvrit brusquement les techniques de combat.

En effet, si l’Amérique moyenne soutenait la guerre au début des années 1960, dans un contexte de guerre froide, il en allait tout autrement quinze ans plus tard.

Les milliers de morts et de blessés dans le camp américain ne trouvaient plus aucun sens dans l’opinion publique, tandis que de nombreux journalistes révélaient la nature des combats, opposant des soldats lourdement armés à des combattants mêlés à la population.

Des photos d’enfants brûlés au napalm ont tôt fait de retourner le peuple américain contre une guerre jugée mal préparée, idéologiquement discutée et grande consommatrice d’hommes et d’argent public.

Dans ce contexte d’après-guerre, la société américaine rejette les vétérans du Viêt Nam, une attitude illustrée notamment par la chanson Born in the USA de Bruce Springsteen, le film Rambo ou plus tard le film Né un 4 juillet avec Tom Cruise.

L’Agence tous risques en est une autre illustration, puisque des soldats ayant agi sur ordre de la hiérarchie se retrouvent face à la justice de leur pays, pour un délit qu’ils n’ont commis que dans le cadre de leur fonction.

Évadés, ils seront pourchassés pour ce délit, ne parvenant pas à faire reconnaître par le département de la Défense le contexte dans lequel les faits reprochés ont été commis.

Par ailleurs, d’un point de vue plus strictement formel, la série marque une évolution (ou du moins y participe) dans la structure des personnages. Autrefois seul, tel un Colombo ou une Arabesque, le héros se multiplie, ici par quatre, offrant plus de possibilités d’identification au spectateur.

 

Chaque personnage est nettement marqué dans ses singularités, l’ensemble formant une équipe hétérogène mais néanmoins soudée, où tous les grands types de caractères se reconnaîtront.

Cette formule d’écriture des séries coexistera néanmoins avec d’autres personnages isolés, tels Magnum ou MacGyver, mais elle continuera de se développer pour atteindre un casting étendu dans des séries comparable à  Jump Street, Beverly Hills  ou Urgences. Dans ces derniers exemples, il est possible de voir apparaître une nébuleuse de personnages, chacun développant une histoire parallèle ou imbriquée avec celle des autres protagonistes.

De multiples spectateurs peuvent désormais s’identifier à un personnage en particulier, peu importe leur race, sexe, religion ou orientation sexuelle dans certains cas.

Enfin, pour les séries plus récentes, une telle évolution correspond peut-être aussi aux plans de carrière des acteurs, qui profitent des séries pour développer une carrière au cinéma (tels Johnny Depp) ou pas (Jason Priestley).

Dans une telle perspective, les producteurs de la série ne peuvent se permettre d’interrompre une saison à cause du départ du rôle-titre. La multiplication des héros offre une solution à ce problème, puisqu’une série peut se passer d’un personnage dont l’histoire dira qu’il est parti à l’étranger, décédé ou quoi que ce soit qui explique son absence au générique.

 

Saisons une à quatre

 

Les épisodes sont en général construits sur des schémas très semblables. Le début de l’épisode correspond à la prise de contact entre un client qui est terrorisé par une association de malfaiteurs ou un potentat local.

La manière classique de cette rencontre est que le client entre en contact alors qu’Hannibal Smith est déguisé, afin de vérifier que le client n’est pas en réalité à la solde des militaires.

Dans d’autres cas, l’Agence est en train de rouler et tombe sur quelqu’un qui a besoin d’aide. La plupart du temps, les honoraires pour l’intervention de l’Agence ne sont soit pas demandés, soit pas perçus ou sont récupérés d’une autre manière (en prélevant sur l’argent des malfaiteurs par exemple).

Généralement, Looping n’est pas présent dans l’équipe car il est interné dans un hôpital psychiatrique, et l’Agence utilise en général Futé pour aller le récupérer grâce à divers stratagèmes.

Ou alors il s’évade de lui-même pour aller rejoindre l’Agence. Dans beaucoup d’épisodes, il aime avoir un objet ou un animal qui ne le quitte pas jusqu’à la fin, tel qu’un cafard, un homard, une chaussette, avec lequel il agace généralement Barracuda avec ses facéties.

Ensuite, l’Agence qui doit se rendre sur le lieu des crimes et délits des malfaiteurs emprunte parfois l’avion, ce que Barracuda déteste particulièrement auquel cas ils doivent l’endormir.

Une fois sur les lieux, il y a souvent une annonce d’Hannibal aux malfaiteurs indiquant qu’ils doivent désormais compter avec eux. Cela produit en général une bagarre sans armes que l’Agence gagne facilement, tout en laissant curieusement leurs ennemis s’échapper.

Peut-être dans l’espoir que ces derniers, impressionnés par les membres de l’Agence, abandonnent leurs entreprises malhonnêtes et s’en aillent.

Les antagonistes reviennent et au lieu de tuer les membres de l’Agence, les laissent (souvent, sans même les ligoter et/ou les bâillonner) dans une grange, un garage ou un entrepôt, voire une mine.

Privés de leurs armes, ils ont néanmoins à leur disposition du matériel tel que de l’acétylène, de la poudre, des tôles et des tubes d’acier permettant à Barracuda de bricoler des armes ou de refaire fonctionner un engin (voiture, tracteur…) ce qui leur permet de s’échapper, et d’arriver à arrêter les malfaiteurs.

Dans d’autres cas, Looping arrive à prendre le contrôle d’un hélicoptère, souvent sous le nez de son propriétaire, ce qui permet de constituer un appui aérien non négligeable.

L’arrestation finale des méchants se fait parfois par un combat à mains nues, qui oppose toujours les méchants à l’agence en respectant la hiérarchie (Hannibal contre le chef de l’équipe, Barracuda contre le noir ou le plus costaud des méchants), ou alors au terme d’une des innombrables poursuites homériques de la série, qui permettent à chaque fois d’admirer les talents de pilote de Barracuda au volant de sa camionnette ou d’un bolide étrange bricolé par l’agence.

Ils doivent souvent partir rapidement après l’arrestation des méchants pour échapper aux colonels Lynch ou Decker. Dans tous les cas, il n’y a en général, même avec l’utilisation d’armes de guerres mortelles, pas de personnes qui soient tuées, voire sérieusement blessées.

La plupart du temps, les ennemis sont sonnés, ou très légèrement blessés (une douleur à un membre ou à la tête). Il n’y a eu, en tout et pour tout, que deux morts dans toute la série. Cette série est devenue pour cette raison un genre à part entière dans la télévision, puisque c’est la première série violente à avoir été diffusée aux heures de grande écoute aux États-Unis justement en raison de l’absence, ou presque, de morts.

À ce titre, la série apparaît quelquefois peu crédible, notamment dans l’épisode Tirez sur le Cheik, où l’hélicoptère des méchants s’écrase contre une falaise et que leurs occupants en ressortent indemnes.

Cinquième saison

L’avant-dernière saison perdant en popularité[réf. nécessaire], le format de la série a été changé pour la dernière saison (1986-1987).

Après avoir échappé pendant des années aux militaires, l’Agence tous risques est finalement arrêtée. Ils ont le choix entre retourner en prison, être exécutés ou être affectés à une agence gouvernementale dirigée par le général Hunt Stockwell qui réalise des missions secrètes. Ils choisissent de travailler avec Stockwell.

 

Arrêt de la série

Selon le producteur Stephen J. Cannell, la série s’est arrêtée au bout de cinq ans parce qu’elle devenait de plus en plus chère à produire. Qui plus est, les acteurs George Peppard, Dirk Benedict et Mr. T étaient de plus en plus démotivés (ce dernier avait d’ailleurs sa propre série, de 1988 à 1990).

Générique

L’Agence tous risques bénéficie de génériques différents à chaque saison, avec une accroche commune : « Il y a dix ans (en 1972), une unité de commando d’élite stationnée au Viêt Nam fut envoyée en prison par un tribunal militaire, pour un crime qu’ils n’avaient pas commis.

Ces hommes s’évadèrent rapidement de leur prison militaire de haute sécurité, se réfugiant dans les bas-fonds de Los Angeles. Aujourd’hui, encore recherchés par le gouvernement, ils fuient encore et toujours devant leurs poursuivants et survivent comme des mercenaires.

Si vous avez un problème, si vous êtes seul, si personne ne peut vous aider, si vous êtes acculé, si la justice ne peut plus rien pour vous, il vous reste un recours, un seul : l’Agence tous risques. »

Plus tard, au cours de la saison 2, l’accroche fut modifiée : « accusés d’un vol qu’ils n’ont pas commis, n’ayant aucun moyen d’en faire la preuve, ils fuient sans cesse devant leurs poursuivants. Pour subsister, ils emploient leurs compétences. Si la loi ne peut plus rien pour vous, il vous reste un recours, un seul : l’Agence tous risques. »

 

 

GEORGE PEPPARD

 

 

 

SOURCES WIKIPEDIA