SOPHIA LOREN ( English/ French/ Italian)


Dans le cadre des articles que nous 茅crivons ou retranscrivons 脿 partir de sources connues ( comme Wikipedia ), nous avons choisi de reprendre la carri猫re artistique et la vie d’une actrice, d’une star italienne qui a crev茅 les 茅crans de Hollywood les ann茅es 50 60 et au del脿… SOPHIA LOREN

Une actrice italienne qui parle aussi bien la langue anglaise/ am茅ricaine que la langue fran莽aise.

La beaut茅, le talent artistique n’a jamais emp锚ch茅 qu’elle ait aussi une culture, 茅ducation et richesse linguistique.

La vie de Sophia Loren , des photos, des vid茅os ( en langue italienne, Anglaise et interviews en langue Fran莽aise ) plus bas dans cet article.

Sachez que vous pouvez traduire aussi bien le site , que les articles via les applications et boutons sur notre site, pour un meilleur confort de lecture
———————————————————–

As part of articles we write or retranscribe from known sources (as Wikipedia), we chose to “talke” about聽 the artistic career and the life of an actress, an Italian star , a Hollywood star also of the 50s, 60s and 70s . Still star today and a Hollywood Icon

An Italian actress who speaks English and American as well as French.

The beauty mixed to the artistic talent added to her culture, education and linguistic skills.

The life of Sophia Loren, photos, videos (in Italian, English and French language interviews) further down in this article.

To precise :聽 that you can translate the website as well as聽 the articles via the applications and buttons on our website, for a better聽 comfort in the language you prefer.


 

sofia loren 1

Sofia Villani Scicolone born 20 September 1934), known professionally as Sophia Loren is an Italian film actress and singer. She is one of the last surviving stars from the Golden Age of Hollywood.

 

Encouraged to enroll in acting lessons after entering a beauty pageant, Loren began her film career at age 16 in 1950. She appeared in several bit parts and minor roles in the early part of the decade, until her five-picture contract with Paramount in 1956 launched her international career. Notable film appearances around this time include The Pride and the Passion, Houseboat, and It Started in Naples.

 

Her talents as an actress were not recognized until her performance as Cesira in Vittorio De Sica’s Two Women (1961); Loren’s performance earned her the Academy Award for Best Actress, making her the first thespian to win an Oscar for a foreign-language performance.

She holds the record for having earned six David di Donatello Awards for Best Actress: Two Women; Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1963); Marriage Italian Style (1964) (for which she was nominated for a second Oscar); Sunflower (1970); The Voyage (1974); and A Special Day (1977).

After starting a family in the early 1970s, Loren chose to make only occasional film appearances. Most recently, she has appeared in American films such as Grumpier Old Men (1995) and Nine (2009).

 

Aside from the Academy Award, she has won a Grammy Award, five special Golden Globes (including the Cecil B. DeMille Award), a BAFTA Award, a Laurel Award, the Volpi Cup for Best Actress at the Venice Film Festival, the Best Actress Award at the Cannes Film Festival and the Honorary Academy Award in 1991.

In 1995, she received the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievements, one of many such awards. In 1999, Loren was named by the American Film Institute the 21st greatest female star of Classic Hollywood Cinema, and she is currently the only living actress on the list.

Sofia Villani Scicolone was born on 20 September 1934 in the Clinica Regina Margherita in Rome, Italy, 聽the daughter of Romilda Villani (1910鈥1991) and Riccardo Scicolone, a construction engineer of noble descent (Loren wrote in her autobiography that she is entitled to call herself the Marquess of Licata Scicolone Murillo).

Loren’s father Riccardo Scicolone refused to marry Villani, 聽leaving the piano teacher and aspiring actress without financial support. Loren met with her father three times, at age five, age seventeen and in 1976 at his deathbed, citing that she forgave him but had never forgotten the abandonment of her mother.

Loren’s parents had another child together, her sister Maria, in 1938. Loren has two younger paternal half-brothers, Giuliano and Giuseppe. Romilda, Sofia, and Maria lived with Loren’s grandmother in Pozzuoli, near Naples.

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During the Second World War, the harbour and munitions plant in Pozzuoli was a frequent bombing target of the Allies. During one raid, as Loren ran to the shelter, she was struck by shrapnel and wounded in the chin. After that, the family moved to Naples, where they were taken in by distant relatives.

After the war, Loren and her family returned to Pozzuoli. Loren’s grandmother Luisa opened a pub in their living room, selling homemade cherry liquor. Romilda Villani played the piano, Maria sang, and Loren waited on tables and washed dishes. The place was popular with the American GIs stationed nearby.

At age 15, Loren as Sofia Lazzaro entered the Miss Italia 1950 beauty pageant and was assigned as Candidate #2, being one to the four sharing contestants representing the Lazio region.

She was selected as one of the last three finalists and won the title of 鈥淢iss Elegance 1950鈥 , while Liliana Cardinale won the title of 鈥淢iss Cinema鈥 and Anna Maria Bugliari won the grand title of Miss Italia. She returned in 2001 as president of the jury for the 61st edition of the pageant. In 2010, Loren crowned the 71st Miss Italia pageant winner.

 

1951鈥1953 as Sofia Scicolone, and as Sofia Lazzaro

At age 17, as Sofia Lazzaro, she enrolled in acting class and was selected as an uncredited extra in Mervyn LeRoy’s 1951 film Quo Vadis (1951), filmed when she was 17 years old.

 

That same year, she appeared in Italian film Era lui… s矛! s矛!, where she played an odalisque, and was credited as Sofia Lazzaro. She appeared in several bit parts and minor roles in the early part of the decade, including the La Favorita (1952).

 

1953鈥1970 as Sophia Loren

Carlo Ponti changed her name and public image to appeal to a wider audience as Sophia Loren, being a twist on the name of the Swedish actress M盲rta Tor茅n and suggested by Goffredo Lombardo. Her first starring role was in Aida (1953), for which she received critical acclaim.

After playing the lead role in Two Nights with Cleopatra (1953), her breakthrough role was in The Gold of Naples (1954), directed by Vittorio De Sica. Too Bad She’s Bad, also released in 1954, and (La Bella Mugnaia) (1955) became the first of many films in which Loren co-starred with Marcello Mastroianni.

Over the next three years, she acted in many films, including Scandal in Sorrento, Lucky to Be a Woman, Boy on a Dolphin, Legend of the Lost and The Pride and the Passion.

 

Loren became an international film star following her five-picture contract with Paramount Pictures in 1958.

Among her films at this time were Desire Under the Elms with Anthony Perkins, based upon the Eugene O’Neill play; Houseboat, a romantic comedy co-starring Cary Grant; and George Cukor’s Heller in Pink Tights, in which she appeared as a blonde for the first time.

 

In 1960, she starred in Vittorio De Sica’s Two Women, a stark, gritty story of a mother who is trying to protect her 12-year-old daughter in war-torn Italy.

The two end up gang-raped inside a church as they travel back to their home city following cessation of bombings there.

Originally cast as the daughter, Loren fought against type and was eventually cast as the mother (actress Eleonora Brown would portray the daughter). Loren’s performance earned her many awards, including the Cannes Film Festival’s best performance prize, and an Academy Award for Best Actress, the first major Academy Award for a non-English-language performance or to an Italian actress.

She won 22 international awards for Two Women. The film was extremely well received by critics and a huge commercial success.

Though proud of this accomplishment, Loren did not show up to this award, citing fear of fainting at the award ceremony.

Nevertheless, Cary Grant telephoned her in Rome the next day to inform her of the Oscar award.[citation needed]

 

During the 1960s, Loren was one of the most popular actresses in the world, and continued to make films in the United States and Europe, starring with prominent leading men. In 1964, her career reached its pinnacle when she received $1 million to appear in The Fall of the Roman Empire.

In 1965, she received a second Academy Award nomination for her performance in Marriage Italian-Style.

 

Drawing of Loren by Nicholas Volpe after she won an Oscar for Two Women (1961)

Among Loren’s best-known films of this period are Samuel Bronston’s epic production of El Cid (1961) with Charlton Heston, The Millionairess (1960) with Peter Sellers,

It Started in Naples (1960) with Clark Gable, Vittorio De Sica’s triptych Yesterday,

Today and Tomorrow (1963) with Marcello Mastroianni,

Peter Ustinov’s Lady L (1965) with Paul Newman,

the 1966 classic Arabesque with Gregory Peck, and Charlie Chaplin’s final film

, A Countess from Hong Kong (1967) with Marlon Brando.

Loren received four Golden Globe Awards between 1964 and 1977 as “World Film Favorite 鈥 Female”

1970鈥1988

Loren worked less after becoming a mother. During the next decade, most of her roles were in Italian features.

During the 1970s, she was paired with Richard Burton in the last De Sica-directed film, The Voyage (1974), and a remake of the film Brief Encounter (1974).

The film had its premiere on US television on 12 November 1974 as part of the Hallmark Hall of Fame series on NBC. In 1976, she starred in The Cassandra Crossing.

It fared extremely well internationally, and was a respectable box office success in US market.

She co-starred with Marcello Mastroianni in Ettore Scola’s A Special Day (1977). This movie was nominated for 11 international awards such as two Oscars (best actor in leading role, best foreign picture).

It won a Golden Globe Award and a C茅sar Award for best foreign movie. Loren’s performance was awarded with a David di Donatello Award, the seventh in her career. The movie was extremely well received by American reviewers and became a box office hit.

Following this success, Loren starred in an American thriller Brass Target.

This movie received mixed reviews, although it was moderately successful in the United States and internationally.

In 1978, she won her fourth Golden Globe for “world film favorite”.

Other movies of this decade were Academy award nominee Sunflower (1970), which was a critical success, and Arthur Hiller’s Man of La Mancha (1972), which was a critical and commercial failure despite being nominated for several awards, including two Golden Globes. O’Toole and James Coco were nominated for two NBR awards, in addition the NBR listed Man of La Mancha in its best ten pictures of 1972 list.

In 1980, after the international success of the biography Sophia Loren: Living and Loving, Her Own Story by A. Hotchner, Loren portrayed herself and her mother in a made-for-television biopic adaptation of her autobiography, Sophia Loren: Her Own Story. Ritza Brown and Chiara Ferrari each portrayed the younger Loren.

In 1981, she became the first female celebrity to launch her own perfume, ‘Sophia’, and a brand of eyewear soon followed.

In 1982, while in Italy, she made headlines after serving an 18-day prison sentence on tax evasion charges 鈥 a fact that failed to hamper her popularity or career.

In fact, Bill Moore, then employed at Pickle Packers International advertising department, sent her a pink pickle-shaped trophy for being “the prettiest lady in the prettiest pickle”. In 2013, the supreme court of Italy cleared her of the charges.

She acted infrequently during the 1980s and in 1981 turned down the role of Alexis Carrington in the television series Dynasty.

Although she was set to star in 13 episodes of CBS’s Falcon Crest in 1984 as Angela Channing’s half-sister Francesca Gioberti, negotiations fell through at the last moment and the role went to Gina Lollobrigida instead. Loren preferred devoting more time to raising her sons.

sophia loren2

Later career

In 1991, Loren received the Academy Honorary Award for her contributions to world cinema and was declared “one of the world cinema’s treasures”. In 1995, she received the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award.

She presented Federico Fellini with his honorary Oscar in April 1993. In 2009, Loren stated on Larry King Live that Fellini had planned to direct her in a film shortly before his death in 1993.

Throughout the 1990s and 2000s, Loren was selective about choosing her films and ventured into various areas of business, including cookbooks, eyewear, jewelry, and perfume.

She received a Golden Globe nomination for her performance in Robert Altman’s film Ready to Wear (1994), co-starring Julia Roberts.

In 1994, a Golden Palm Star on the Palm Springs, California Walk of Stars was dedicated to her.

In Grumpier Old Men (1995), Loren played a femme fatale opposite Walter Matthau, Jack Lemmon, and Ann-Margret.

The film was a box-office success and became Loren’s biggest US hit in years.

At the 20th Moscow International Film Festival in 1997, she was awarded an Honorable Prize for contribution to cinema. In 1999, the American Film Institute named Loren among the greatest female stars of Golden Age of Hollywood cinema.

In 2001, Loren received a Special Grand Prix of the Americas Award at the Montreal World Film Festival for her body of work.She filmed two projects in Canada during this time: the independent film Between Strangers (2002), directed by her son Edoardo and co-starring Mira Sorvino, and the television miniseries Lives of the Saints (2004).

In 2009, after five years off the set and 14 years since she starred in a prominent US theatrical film, Loren starred in Rob Marshall’s film version of Nine, based on the Broadway musical that tells the story of a director whose midlife crisis causes him to struggle to complete his latest film;

he is forced to balance the influences of numerous formative women in his life, including his deceased mother. Loren was Marshall’s first and only choice for the role.

The film also stars Daniel Day-Lewis, Pen茅lope Cruz, Kate Hudson, Marion Cotillard, and Nicole Kidman. As a part of the cast, she received her first nomination for a Screen Actors Guild Award.

In 2010, Loren played her own mother in a two-part Italian television miniseries about her early life, directed by Vittorio Sindoni with Margareth Mad猫 as Loren, entitled La Mia Casa 脠 Piena di Specchi , based on the memoir by her sister Maria.

In July 2013, Loren made her film comeback in an Italian adaptation of Jean Cocteau’s 1930 play The Human Voice (La Voce Umana), which charts the breakdown of a woman who is left by her lover 鈥 with her youngest son, Edoardo Ponti, as director.

Filming took under a month during July in various locations in Italy, including Rome and Naples. It was Loren’s first significant feature film since Nine.

Loren received a star on 16 November 2017, at Almeria Walk of Fame due to his intervention in Bianco, rosso e…. She received the Almer铆a Tierra de Cine award.

In September 1999, Loren filed a lawsuit against 79 adult websites for posting altered nude photos of her on the internet.

Loren is a Roman Catholic. Her primary residence has been in Geneva, Switzerland, since late 2006. She also owns homes in Naples and Rome.

Loren is an ardent fan of the football club S.S.C. Napoli. In May 2007, when the team was third in Serie B, she (then age 72) told the Gazzetta dello Sport that she would do a striptease if the team won.

HOUSEBOAT MOVIE

HOUSEBOAT MOVIE

Affair with Cary Grant

Loren and Cary Grant co-starred in Houseboat (1958). Grant’s wife Betsy Drake wrote the original script, and Grant originally intended that she would star with him.

After he began an affair with Loren while filming The Pride and the Passion (1957), Grant arranged for Loren to take Drake’s place with a rewritten script for which Drake did not receive credit.

The affair ended in bitterness before The Pride and the Passion’s filming ended, causing problems on the Houseboat set.

Grant hoped to resume the relationship, but Loren agreed to marry Carlo Ponti, instead.

Marriage and family

Loren first met Ponti in 1950, when she was 16 and he was 37.

Though Ponti had been long separated from his first wife, Giuliana, he was not legally divorced when Loren married him by proxy (two male lawyers stood in for them) in Mexico on 17 September 1957.

The couple had their marriage annulled in 1962 to escape bigamy charges, but continued to live together.

In 1965, they became French citizens after their application was approved by then French President Georges Pompidou. Ponti then obtained a divorce from Giuliana in France, allowing him to marry Loren on 9 April 1966.

They had two children, Carlo Ponti Jr., born on 29 December 1968, and Edoardo Ponti, born on 6 January 1973.Loren’s daughters-in-law are Sasha Alexander and Andrea Meszaros. Loren has four grandchildren. Loren remained married to Carlo Ponti until his death on 10 January 2007 of pulmonary complications.

sophia loren and Carlo Ponti

In 1962, Loren’s sister Maria married the youngest son of Benito Mussolini, Romano, with whom she had two daughters, Alessandra, a national conservative Italian politician, and Elisabetta.

 

JEAN-PAUL BELMONDO


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TABBOUCH & Cie

Jean-Paul Belmondo, n茅 le 9 avril 1933 脿 Neuilly-sur-Seine est un acteur fran莽ais. Il a 茅galement 茅t茅 producteur de cin茅ma et directeur de th茅芒tre.

Alternant dans les premi猫res ann茅es de sa carri猫re les films populaires et d鈥橝rt et Essai avant de pencher nettement pour la premi猫re cat茅gorie, il est rapidement devenu l鈥檜ne des plus grandes vedettes du cin茅ma fran莽ais, champion incontest茅 du box-office au m锚me titre que Louis de Fun猫s et Alain Delon 脿 la m锚me 茅poque.

En cinquante ans de carri猫re, il a attir茅 dans les salles pr猫s de 130 millions de spectateurs : entre 1969 et 1982, il a jou茅 脿 quatre reprises dans le film le plus vu de l鈥檃nn茅e en France (Le Cerveau, Peur sur la ville, L鈥橝nimal, L鈥橝s des as), 茅galant le record de Fernandel et n鈥櫭﹖ant d茅pass茅 sur ce point que par Louis de Fun猫s.

belmondo 5 BEBEL

Il a tourn茅 sous la direction de grands鈥

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Barry Manilow


 

Barry Manilow

Remember this artist? Those Hits from 70s
It’s time to remember or even to discover

 

Click on video to listen to some of Barry’s Hits

 

 

 

THEY LOOK LIKE…


Anonymous people who look like artists. Here are some amazing photos . Hoping that they will please you.聽 Some of them are already stars in their own countries because of their “look”

 

Brazilian Dany De Vito

Brazilian Dany De Vito

Brazilian Dany De Vito

 

Turkish George Clooney

Turkish George Clooney

Turkish George Clooney

 

 

Mexican Morgan Freeman

MEXICAN MORGAN FREEMAN

MEXICAN MORGAN FREEMAN

 

 

Russian Hugh Laurie (Dr House)

Russian Hugh Laurie Dr House

Russian Hugh Laurie Dr House

 

 

Asian Brad Pitt

asian brad pitt

asian brad pitt

 

Asian Morgan Freeman

asian brad pitt

asian brad pitt

 

 

Chinese Vladimir Putin ( Poutine)

chinese vladimir Poutine

chinese vladimir Poutine

 

 

Indian Bradley Cooper

indian bradley cooper

indian bradley cooper

 

 

Indian Clark Gable

indian clark gable

indian clark gable

 

 

Indonesian Obama

indonesian Barak Obama

indonesian Barak Obama

 

 

Mexican Obama

mexican obama

mexican obama

 

Japanese Bruce Willis

japanese bruce willis

japanese bruce willis

 

Peruvian Morgan Freeman

peruvian morgan freeman

peruvian morgan freeman

 

Russian Jim Carrey

Russian Jim Carrey

Russian Jim Carrey

 

Vietnamese George W Bush

Vietnamese George W Bush

Vietnamese George W Bush

SOURCES : BORED PANDA聽 聽https://boredpanda.com/foreign-celebrity-lookalikes聽

 

 

 

Julie Andrews – Jack Lemmon in THAT’S LIFE


That’s Life! is a 1986 American comedy-drama film starring Jack Lemmon and Julie Andrews, directed by Blake Edwards.

 

 

The film was made independently by Edwards using largely his own finances and was distributed by Columbia Pictures. Although Columbia released the film, Artisan Entertainment holds the rights to distribute it on DVD.

That’s Life! was shot in Edwards and his wife Andrews’ own beachside home in Malibu and features their family in small roles, including two daughters. Lemmon’s son Chris Lemmon plays his character’s son Josh, while his wife Felicia Farr puts in a brief cameo appearance as a fortune teller.

Because of the film’s independent status, many of the cast and crew were paid below union-level wages, resulting in the American Society of Cinematographers picketing the film during production and taking an advertisement in Variety in protest. As a result, the original director of photography, Harry Stradling Jr., was forced to quit the film and was subsequently replaced by Anthony Richmond, a British cinematographer.

 

Harvey Fairchild is a wealthy, Malibu-based architect who is turning 60 and suffering from a form of male menopause. He feels aches and pains, real or imaginary, and seems unhappy with his professional and personal life.

Harvey’s patient wife Gillian tries to cheer him with family get-togethers and an elaborately planned birthday party. But she secretly has worries of her own, a throat condition that could result in the loss of her voice.

 

Whining his way through day after day, Harvey snaps at his pregnant daughter Megan and makes rude remarks to his actor son Josh. He tries going to a priest, only to discover that the man to whom he is confessing is an old rival from their college years at Notre Dame. He also consults a local psychic, Madame Carrie, sex with whom leaves Harvey with a venereal disease.

The miserable Harvey is furious with a client named Janice Kern who can’t stop revising her plans for a magnificent house Harvey has been building, but he has meaningless sex with her as well. Gillian bravely hides her cancer fear from the family, but finally, overcome with emotion, she confides in her friend and neighbor, Holly.

Harvey threatens to spoil the birthday party for everybody. He is in such a foul mood that just because a friend named Belmont tells him a depressing story about an illness, he amuses himself by introducing Belmont to the VD-infected psychic.

Gillian warns her husband that he is going to lose everything if he continues to behave this way. During his party, Gillian’s doctor arrives to inform her that the biopsy test results are negative and she is going to be all right. She takes Harvey aside to let him know just how precious life really can be.

Jack Lemmon as Harvey Fairchild

Julie Andrews as Gillian Fairchild

Sally Kellerman as Holly Parrish

Robert Loggia as Father Baragone

Jennifer Edwards as Megan Fairchild Bartlet

Rob Knepper as Steve Larwin

Matt Lattanzi as Larry Bartlet

Chris Lemmon as Josh Fairchild

Cynthia Sikes as Janice Kern

Dana Sparks as Fanny Ward

Emma Walton as Kate Fairchild

Felicia Farr as Madame Carrie

 

VIDEOS OF JULIE ANDREWS

 

 

SOURCES VIDEO: YOUTUBE

SOURCES ARTICLE : WIKIPEDIA

SOURCES PHOTOS : VARIOUS

AMERICAN GRAFFITI


American Graffiti is a 1973 American coming-of-age comedy-drama film directed and co-written by George Lucas starring Richard Dreyfuss, Ron Howard, Paul Le Mat, Harrison Ford, Charles Martin Smith, Cindy Williams, Candy Clark, Mackenzie Phillips, Bo Hopkins, and Wolfman Jack. Suzanne Somers and Joe Spano also appear in the film.

 

Set in Modesto, California in 1962, the film is a study of the cruising and rock and roll cultures popular among the post鈥揥orld War II baby boom generation. The film is told in a series of vignettes, telling the story of a group of teenagers and their adventures over a single night.

The genesis of American Graffiti was in Lucas‘ own teenage years in early 1960s Modesto. He was unsuccessful in pitching the concept to financiers and distributors but found favor at Universal Pictures after United Artists, 20th Century Fox, Columbia Pictures, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Warner Bros., and Paramount Pictures turned him down. Filming was initially set to take place in San Rafael, California, but the production crew was denied permission to shoot beyond a second day.

 

American Graffiti premiered on August 2, 1973 at the Locarno International Film Festival in Switzerland and was released on August 11, 1973 in the United States. The film received widespread critical acclaim and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. Produced on a $777,000 budget, it has become one of the most profitable films of all time. Since its initial release, American Graffiti has garnered an estimated return of well over $200 million in box office gross and home video sales, not including merchandising. In 1995, the United States Library of Congress deemed the film “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” and selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry.

 

In early September 1962 in Modesto, California, on the last evening of summer vacation, recent high school graduates and longtime friends, Curt Henderson and Steve Bolander, meet John Milner, the drag-racing king of the town, and Terry “The Toad” Fields in the parking lot of the local Mel’s Drive-In diner. Curt and Steve are scheduled to travel the next morning to Northeastern United States to start college. Despite receiving a $2,000 scholarship from the local Moose Lodge, Curt has second thoughts about leaving Modesto. Steve gives Toad his 1958 Chevrolet Impala to watch while he’s away at college until he returns at Christmas. Steve’s girlfriend, Laurie, who is also Curt’s sister, arrives in her car. Steve suggests to Laurie, who is already glum about him going to college, that they see other people while he is away in order to “strengthen” their relationship. Though not openly upset, she is displeased with his proposal which affects their interactions the rest of the evening.

 

Curt accompanies Steve, last year’s high school student class president, and Laurie, the current head cheerleader, to the back-to-high-school sock hop. In one story line, Curt is desperate to find a beautiful blonde girl driving a white 1956 Ford Thunderbird that he sees en route to the dance: at a stoplight, she appears to say “I love you” before disappearing around the corner. After leaving the hop, Curt is coerced by a group of greasers (“The Pharaohs”) to participate in an initiation rite that involves hooking a chain to a police car and ripping out its back axle. The Pharaohs tell Curt that “The Blonde” is a trophy wife or prostitute, but he refuses to believe either.

Determined to get a message to the blonde girl, Curt drives to the local radio station to ask DJ Wolfman Jack, who is omnipresent on the car radios, to announce a message for the blonde girl. Inside the radio station, Curt encounters a bearded man who tells him that the voice of The Wolfman is pre-taped from afar.

The man still accepts the message from Curt to see what he could do. As he is leaving the station, Curt sees the man talking into the microphone and hears the voice of The Wolfman, and realizes the man is the actual DJ himself.

 

Sure enough, The Wolfman eventually reads the message on the radio for “The Blonde” to meet Curt or call him at a number which happens to be a telephone booth. Curt waits by the telephone booth and early the next morning, he is awakened by the phone ringing. It turns out to be “The Blonde” who says she knows him and maybe she would see him cruising the coming night. Curt replies probably not, intimating that he decided to go to college and will be leaving that morning.

The Toad, in Steve’s car, and John, in his yellow 1932 Ford Deuce Coup茅 hot rod, cruise the strip of Modesto. Toad, who is normally socially inept with girls, successfully picks up a flirtatious, and somewhat rebellious, girl named Debbie. John inadvertently picks up Carol, an annoying 12-year-old who seems fond of him. Another drag racer, the handsome and arrogant Bob Falfa, is searching out John in order to challenge him to a race.

Steve and Laurie have a series of arguments and make-ups through the evening. They finally split and, as the story lines intertwine, Bob Falfa picks up Laurie in his black 1955 Chevrolet One-Fifty Coup茅. Bob finally finds John and goads him into racing. A parade of cars follow them to “Paradise Road” to watch the race. Laurie rides shotgun with Bob as Toad starts the race. As Bob begins taking a lead in the race, he loses control of the car when a front tire blows, and the car plunges into a ditch and rolls over. Steve and John leap out of their cars and rush to the wreck as a dazed Bob and Laurie stagger out of the car before it explodes. Distraught, Laurie grips Steve tightly and begs him not to leave her. He assures her that he will stay in Modesto.

At the airfield in the morning, Curt says goodbye to his parents, his sister Laurie, Steve, John and The Toad. As the plane takes off, Curt, gazing out of the window, sees the white Ford Thunderbird belonging to the mysterious blonde driving down a country road.

An on-screen epilogue reveals that

John is killed by a drunk driver in December 1964,

Toad is reported missing in action near An L峄檆 in December 1965,

Steve is an insurance agent in Modesto, California,

and

Curt is a writer living in Canada.

 

Richard Dreyfuss as Curt Henderson

Ron Howard as Steve Bolander

Paul Le Mat as John Milner

Charles Martin Smith as Terry “The Toad” Fields

Cindy Williams as Laurie Henderson

Candy Clark as Debbie Dunham

Mackenzie Phillips as Carol Morrison

Wolfman Jack as himself

Bo Hopkins as Joe Young

Manuel Padilla, Jr. as Carlos

Harrison Ford as Bob Falfa

Lynne Marie Stewart as Bobbie Tucker

Terry McGovern as Mr. Wolfe

Kathleen Quinlan as Peg

Scott Beach as Mr. Gordon

Susan Richardson as Judy

Kay Lenz as Jane

Joe Spano as Vic

Debralee Scott as Falfa’s Girl

Suzanne Somers as “The Blonde” in T-Bird

American Graffiti

 

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Sources : Wikipedia / YouTube/Pinterest/Google/Tumblr/various

CARY GRANT : On PARAMOUNT CHANNEL


PARAMOUNT CHANNEL : CARY GRANT 聽 聽 聽 Wikipedia sources:聽 Cary Grant聽(born聽Archibald Alexander Leach; January 18, 1904 鈥 November 29, 1986) was an English stage and Hollywood film actor who became an American citizen in 1942. Known for his聽transatlantic accent, debonair demeanor and “dashing good looks”, Grant is considered one of聽classic Hollywood’s definitive聽leading men. Notorious聽(1946),聽The鈥

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