SOPHIA LOREN ( English/ French/ Italian)


Dans le cadre des articles que nous écrivons ou retranscrivons à partir de sources connues ( comme Wikipedia ), nous avons choisi de reprendre la carrière artistique et la vie d’une actrice, d’une star italienne qui a crevé les écrans de Hollywood les années 50 60 et au delà… SOPHIA LOREN

Une actrice italienne qui parle aussi bien la langue anglaise/ américaine que la langue française.

La beauté, le talent artistique n’a jamais empêché qu’elle ait aussi une culture, éducation et richesse linguistique.

La vie de Sophia Loren , des photos, des vidéos ( en langue italienne, Anglaise et interviews en langue Française ) plus bas dans cet article.

Sachez que vous pouvez traduire aussi bien le site , que les articles via les applications et boutons sur notre site, pour un meilleur confort de lecture
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As part of articles we write or retranscribe from known sources (as Wikipedia), we chose to “talke” about  the artistic career and the life of an actress, an Italian star , a Hollywood star also of the 50s, 60s and 70s . Still star today and a Hollywood Icon

An Italian actress who speaks English and American as well as French.

The beauty mixed to the artistic talent added to her culture, education and linguistic skills.

The life of Sophia Loren, photos, videos (in Italian, English and French language interviews) further down in this article.

To precise :  that you can translate the website as well as  the articles via the applications and buttons on our website, for a better  comfort in the language you prefer.


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Sofia Villani Scicolone born 20 September 1934), known professionally as Sophia Loren is an Italian film actress and singer. She is one of the last surviving stars from the Golden Age of Hollywood.

Encouraged to enroll in acting lessons after entering a beauty pageant, Loren began her film career at age 16 in 1950. She appeared in several bit parts and minor roles in the early part of the decade, until her five-picture contract with Paramount in 1956 launched her international career. Notable film appearances around this time include The Pride and the Passion, Houseboat, and It Started in Naples.

Her talents as an actress were not recognized until her performance as Cesira in Vittorio De Sica’s Two Women (1961); Loren’s performance earned her the Academy Award for Best Actress, making her the first thespian to win an Oscar for a foreign-language performance.

She holds the record for having earned six David di Donatello Awards for Best Actress: Two Women; Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1963); Marriage Italian Style (1964) (for which she was nominated for a second Oscar); Sunflower (1970); The Voyage (1974); and A Special Day (1977).

After starting a family in the early 1970s, Loren chose to make only occasional film appearances. Most recently, she has appeared in American films such as Grumpier Old Men (1995) and Nine (2009).

Aside from the Academy Award, she has won a Grammy Award, five special Golden Globes (including the Cecil B. DeMille Award), a BAFTA Award, a Laurel Award, the Volpi Cup for Best Actress at the Venice Film Festival, the Best Actress Award at the Cannes Film Festival and the Honorary Academy Award in 1991.

In 1995, she received the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievements, one of many such awards. In 1999, Loren was named by the American Film Institute the 21st greatest female star of Classic Hollywood Cinema, and she is currently the only living actress on the list.

Sofia Villani Scicolone was born on 20 September 1934 in the Clinica Regina Margherita in Rome, Italy,  the daughter of Romilda Villani (1910–1991) and Riccardo Scicolone, a construction engineer of noble descent (Loren wrote in her autobiography that she is entitled to call herself the Marquess of Licata Scicolone Murillo).

Loren’s father Riccardo Scicolone refused to marry Villani,  leaving the piano teacher and aspiring actress without financial support. Loren met with her father three times, at age five, age seventeen and in 1976 at his deathbed, citing that she forgave him but had never forgotten the abandonment of her mother.

Loren’s parents had another child together, her sister Maria, in 1938. Loren has two younger paternal half-brothers, Giuliano and Giuseppe. Romilda, Sofia, and Maria lived with Loren’s grandmother in Pozzuoli, near Naples.

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During the Second World War, the harbour and munitions plant in Pozzuoli was a frequent bombing target of the Allies. During one raid, as Loren ran to the shelter, she was struck by shrapnel and wounded in the chin. After that, the family moved to Naples, where they were taken in by distant relatives.

After the war, Loren and her family returned to Pozzuoli. Loren’s grandmother Luisa opened a pub in their living room, selling homemade cherry liquor. Romilda Villani played the piano, Maria sang, and Loren waited on tables and washed dishes. The place was popular with the American GIs stationed nearby.

At age 15, Loren as Sofia Lazzaro entered the Miss Italia 1950 beauty pageant and was assigned as Candidate #2, being one to the four sharing contestants representing the Lazio region.

She was selected as one of the last three finalists and won the title of “Miss Elegance 1950” , while Liliana Cardinale won the title of “Miss Cinema” and Anna Maria Bugliari won the grand title of Miss Italia. She returned in 2001 as president of the jury for the 61st edition of the pageant. In 2010, Loren crowned the 71st Miss Italia pageant winner.

1951–1953 as Sofia Scicolone, and as Sofia Lazzaro

At age 17, as Sofia Lazzaro, she enrolled in acting class and was selected as an uncredited extra in Mervyn LeRoy’s 1951 film Quo Vadis (1951), filmed when she was 17 years old.

That same year, she appeared in Italian film Era lui… sì! sì!, where she played an odalisque, and was credited as Sofia Lazzaro. She appeared in several bit parts and minor roles in the early part of the decade, including the La Favorita (1952).

1953–1970 as Sophia Loren

Carlo Ponti changed her name and public image to appeal to a wider audience as Sophia Loren, being a twist on the name of the Swedish actress Märta Torén and suggested by Goffredo Lombardo. Her first starring role was in Aida (1953), for which she received critical acclaim.

After playing the lead role in Two Nights with Cleopatra (1953), her breakthrough role was in The Gold of Naples (1954), directed by Vittorio De Sica. Too Bad She’s Bad, also released in 1954, and (La Bella Mugnaia) (1955) became the first of many films in which Loren co-starred with Marcello Mastroianni.

Over the next three years, she acted in many films, including Scandal in Sorrento, Lucky to Be a Woman, Boy on a Dolphin, Legend of the Lost and The Pride and the Passion.

Loren became an international film star following her five-picture contract with Paramount Pictures in 1958.

Among her films at this time were Desire Under the Elms with Anthony Perkins, based upon the Eugene O’Neill play; Houseboat, a romantic comedy co-starring Cary Grant; and George Cukor’s Heller in Pink Tights, in which she appeared as a blonde for the first time.

In 1960, she starred in Vittorio De Sica’s Two Women, a stark, gritty story of a mother who is trying to protect her 12-year-old daughter in war-torn Italy.

The two end up gang-raped inside a church as they travel back to their home city following cessation of bombings there.

Originally cast as the daughter, Loren fought against type and was eventually cast as the mother (actress Eleonora Brown would portray the daughter). Loren’s performance earned her many awards, including the Cannes Film Festival’s best performance prize, and an Academy Award for Best Actress, the first major Academy Award for a non-English-language performance or to an Italian actress.

She won 22 international awards for Two Women. The film was extremely well received by critics and a huge commercial success.

Though proud of this accomplishment, Loren did not show up to this award, citing fear of fainting at the award ceremony.

Nevertheless, Cary Grant telephoned her in Rome the next day to inform her of the Oscar award.[citation needed]

During the 1960s, Loren was one of the most popular actresses in the world, and continued to make films in the United States and Europe, starring with prominent leading men. In 1964, her career reached its pinnacle when she received $1 million to appear in The Fall of the Roman Empire.

In 1965, she received a second Academy Award nomination for her performance in Marriage Italian-Style.

Drawing of Loren by Nicholas Volpe after she won an Oscar for Two Women (1961)

Among Loren’s best-known films of this period are Samuel Bronston’s epic production of El Cid (1961) with Charlton Heston, The Millionairess (1960) with Peter Sellers,

It Started in Naples (1960) with Clark Gable, Vittorio De Sica’s triptych Yesterday,

Today and Tomorrow (1963) with Marcello Mastroianni,

Peter Ustinov’s Lady L (1965) with Paul Newman,

the 1966 classic Arabesque with Gregory Peck, and Charlie Chaplin’s final film

, A Countess from Hong Kong (1967) with Marlon Brando.

Loren received four Golden Globe Awards between 1964 and 1977 as “World Film Favorite – Female”

1970–1988

Loren worked less after becoming a mother. During the next decade, most of her roles were in Italian features.

During the 1970s, she was paired with Richard Burton in the last De Sica-directed film, The Voyage (1974), and a remake of the film Brief Encounter (1974).

The film had its premiere on US television on 12 November 1974 as part of the Hallmark Hall of Fame series on NBC. In 1976, she starred in The Cassandra Crossing.

It fared extremely well internationally, and was a respectable box office success in US market.

She co-starred with Marcello Mastroianni in Ettore Scola’s A Special Day (1977). This movie was nominated for 11 international awards such as two Oscars (best actor in leading role, best foreign picture).

It won a Golden Globe Award and a César Award for best foreign movie. Loren’s performance was awarded with a David di Donatello Award, the seventh in her career. The movie was extremely well received by American reviewers and became a box office hit.

Following this success, Loren starred in an American thriller Brass Target.

This movie received mixed reviews, although it was moderately successful in the United States and internationally.

In 1978, she won her fourth Golden Globe for “world film favorite”.

Other movies of this decade were Academy award nominee Sunflower (1970), which was a critical success, and Arthur Hiller’s Man of La Mancha (1972), which was a critical and commercial failure despite being nominated for several awards, including two Golden Globes. O’Toole and James Coco were nominated for two NBR awards, in addition the NBR listed Man of La Mancha in its best ten pictures of 1972 list.

In 1980, after the international success of the biography Sophia Loren: Living and Loving, Her Own Story by A. Hotchner, Loren portrayed herself and her mother in a made-for-television biopic adaptation of her autobiography, Sophia Loren: Her Own Story. Ritza Brown and Chiara Ferrari each portrayed the younger Loren.

In 1981, she became the first female celebrity to launch her own perfume, ‘Sophia’, and a brand of eyewear soon followed.

In 1982, while in Italy, she made headlines after serving an 18-day prison sentence on tax evasion charges – a fact that failed to hamper her popularity or career.

In fact, Bill Moore, then employed at Pickle Packers International advertising department, sent her a pink pickle-shaped trophy for being “the prettiest lady in the prettiest pickle”. In 2013, the supreme court of Italy cleared her of the charges.

She acted infrequently during the 1980s and in 1981 turned down the role of Alexis Carrington in the television series Dynasty.

Although she was set to star in 13 episodes of CBS’s Falcon Crest in 1984 as Angela Channing’s half-sister Francesca Gioberti, negotiations fell through at the last moment and the role went to Gina Lollobrigida instead. Loren preferred devoting more time to raising her sons.

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Later career

In 1991, Loren received the Academy Honorary Award for her contributions to world cinema and was declared “one of the world cinema’s treasures”. In 1995, she received the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award.

She presented Federico Fellini with his honorary Oscar in April 1993. In 2009, Loren stated on Larry King Live that Fellini had planned to direct her in a film shortly before his death in 1993.

Throughout the 1990s and 2000s, Loren was selective about choosing her films and ventured into various areas of business, including cookbooks, eyewear, jewelry, and perfume.

She received a Golden Globe nomination for her performance in Robert Altman’s film Ready to Wear (1994), co-starring Julia Roberts.

In 1994, a Golden Palm Star on the Palm Springs, California Walk of Stars was dedicated to her.

In Grumpier Old Men (1995), Loren played a femme fatale opposite Walter Matthau, Jack Lemmon, and Ann-Margret.

The film was a box-office success and became Loren’s biggest US hit in years.

At the 20th Moscow International Film Festival in 1997, she was awarded an Honorable Prize for contribution to cinema. In 1999, the American Film Institute named Loren among the greatest female stars of Golden Age of Hollywood cinema.

In 2001, Loren received a Special Grand Prix of the Americas Award at the Montreal World Film Festival for her body of work.She filmed two projects in Canada during this time: the independent film Between Strangers (2002), directed by her son Edoardo and co-starring Mira Sorvino, and the television miniseries Lives of the Saints (2004).

In 2009, after five years off the set and 14 years since she starred in a prominent US theatrical film, Loren starred in Rob Marshall’s film version of Nine, based on the Broadway musical that tells the story of a director whose midlife crisis causes him to struggle to complete his latest film;

he is forced to balance the influences of numerous formative women in his life, including his deceased mother. Loren was Marshall’s first and only choice for the role.

The film also stars Daniel Day-Lewis, Penélope Cruz, Kate Hudson, Marion Cotillard, and Nicole Kidman. As a part of the cast, she received her first nomination for a Screen Actors Guild Award.

In 2010, Loren played her own mother in a two-part Italian television miniseries about her early life, directed by Vittorio Sindoni with Margareth Madè as Loren, entitled La Mia Casa È Piena di Specchi , based on the memoir by her sister Maria.

In July 2013, Loren made her film comeback in an Italian adaptation of Jean Cocteau’s 1930 play The Human Voice (La Voce Umana), which charts the breakdown of a woman who is left by her lover – with her youngest son, Edoardo Ponti, as director.

Filming took under a month during July in various locations in Italy, including Rome and Naples. It was Loren’s first significant feature film since Nine.

Loren received a star on 16 November 2017, at Almeria Walk of Fame due to his intervention in Bianco, rosso e…. She received the Almería Tierra de Cine award.

In September 1999, Loren filed a lawsuit against 79 adult websites for posting altered nude photos of her on the internet.

Loren is a Roman Catholic. Her primary residence has been in Geneva, Switzerland, since late 2006. She also owns homes in Naples and Rome.

Loren is an ardent fan of the football club S.S.C. Napoli. In May 2007, when the team was third in Serie B, she (then age 72) told the Gazzetta dello Sport that she would do a striptease if the team won.

HOUSEBOAT MOVIE
HOUSEBOAT MOVIE

Affair with Cary Grant

Loren and Cary Grant co-starred in Houseboat (1958). Grant’s wife Betsy Drake wrote the original script, and Grant originally intended that she would star with him.

After he began an affair with Loren while filming The Pride and the Passion (1957), Grant arranged for Loren to take Drake’s place with a rewritten script for which Drake did not receive credit.

The affair ended in bitterness before The Pride and the Passion’s filming ended, causing problems on the Houseboat set.

Grant hoped to resume the relationship, but Loren agreed to marry Carlo Ponti, instead.

Marriage and family

Loren first met Ponti in 1950, when she was 16 and he was 37.

Though Ponti had been long separated from his first wife, Giuliana, he was not legally divorced when Loren married him by proxy (two male lawyers stood in for them) in Mexico on 17 September 1957.

The couple had their marriage annulled in 1962 to escape bigamy charges, but continued to live together.

In 1965, they became French citizens after their application was approved by then French President Georges Pompidou. Ponti then obtained a divorce from Giuliana in France, allowing him to marry Loren on 9 April 1966.

They had two children, Carlo Ponti Jr., born on 29 December 1968, and Edoardo Ponti, born on 6 January 1973.Loren’s daughters-in-law are Sasha Alexander and Andrea Meszaros. Loren has four grandchildren. Loren remained married to Carlo Ponti until his death on 10 January 2007 of pulmonary complications.

sophia loren and Carlo Ponti

In 1962, Loren’s sister Maria married the youngest son of Benito Mussolini, Romano, with whom she had two daughters, Alessandra, a national conservative Italian politician, and Elisabetta.

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CARY GRANT : On PARAMOUNT CHANNEL


PARAMOUNT CHANNEL : CARY GRANT

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Wikipedia sources: 

Cary Grant (born Archibald Alexander Leach; January 18, 1904 – November 29, 1986) was an English stage and Hollywood film actor who became an American citizen in 1942. Known for his transatlantic accent, debonair demeanor and “dashing good looks”, Grant is considered one of classic Hollywood‘s definitive leading men.

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Notorious (1946), The Bishop’s Wife (1947), To Catch a Thief (1955), An Affair to Remember (1957), North by Northwest (1959), and Charade (1963).

Nominated twice for the Academy Award for Best Actor (Penny Serenade and None But the Lonely Heart) and five times for a Golden Globe Award for Best Actor, Grant was continually passed over. In 1970, he was presented an Honorary Oscar at the 42nd Academy Awards by Frank Sinatra “for his unique mastery of the art of screen acting with the respect and affection of his colleagues

Early life and career

Archibald Alexander Leach was born at 15 Hughenden Road, HorfieldBristolEngland, to Elsie Maria (née Kingdon) Leach (1877–1973) and Elias James Leach (1873–1935). An only child, Leach had an unhappy upbringing, attending Bishop Road Primary School.

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CARY GRANT WITH AUDREY HEPBURN

His mother had suffered from clinical depression since the death of a previous child. Her husband placed her in a mental institution and told his 9-year-old son only that she had gone away on a “long holiday”. Believing she was dead, Leach did not learn otherwise until he was 31 and discovered her alive in a care facility.  When Leach was 10, his father abandoned him after remarrying and having a baby with his new young wife. 

Leach was expelled from the Fairfield Grammar School in Bristol in 1918. After joining the “Bob Pender Stage Troupe”, Leach performed as a stilt walker and traveled with the group to the United States in 1920 at the age of 16 on the RMS Olympic, on a two-year tour of the country. He was processed at Ellis Island on July 28, 1920.

When the troupe returned to the UK, he decided to stay in the U.S. and continue his stage career. During this time, he became a part of thevaudeville world and toured with Parker, Rand, and Leach.

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Still using his birth name, he performed on the stage at The Muny in St. Louis,Missouri, in such shows as Irene (1931), Music in May (1931), Nina Rosa (1931), Rio Rita (1931), Street Singer (1931), The Three Musketeers (1931), and Wonderful Night (1931). Leach’s experience on stage as a stilt walker, acrobat, juggler, and mime taught him “phenomenal physical grace and exquisite comic timing” and the value of teamwork, skills which would benefit him in Hollywood.

Leach became a naturalized United States citizen on June 26, 1942, at which time he also legally changed his name from “Archibald Alexander Leach” to “Cary Grant”.

After appearing in several musicals on Broadway under the name Archie Leach, Leach went to Hollywood in 1931.  When told to change his name, he proposed “Cary Lockwood”, the name of the character he had played in the Broadway show Nikki, based upon the recent film The Last Flight.

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He signed with Paramount Pictures, where studio bosses decided that the name “Cary” was acceptable but that “Lockwood” was too similar to another actor’s surname. Paramount gave their new actor a list of surnames to choose from, and he selected “Grant” because the initials C and G had already proved lucky for Clark Gable and Gary Cooper, two of Hollywood’s biggest film stars.

Grant appeared as a leading man opposite Marlene Dietrich in Blonde Venus (1932), and his stardom was given a further boost by Mae Westwhen she chose him for her leading man in two of her most successful films, She Done Him Wrong and I’m No Angel (both 1933).  

I’m No Angel was a tremendous financial success and, along with She Done Him Wrong, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Picture, saved Paramount from bankruptcy. Paramount put Grant in a series of unsuccessful films until 1936, when he signed with Columbia Pictures. His first major comedy hit was when he was loaned to Hal Roach‘s studio for the 1937 Topper (which was distributed by MGM).

The Awful Truth (1937) was a pivotal film in Grant’s career, establishing for him a screen persona as a sophisticated light comedy leading man. As Grant later wrote, “I pretended to be somebody I wanted to be and I finally became that person. Or he became me. Or we met at some point.”  Grant is said to have based his characterization in The Awful Truth on the mannerisms and intonations of the film’s director, Leo McCarey, whom he resembled physically. As writer/director Peter Bogdanovich noted, “After The Awful Truth, when it came to light comedy, there was Cary Grant and then everyone else was an also-ran.”

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CARY GRANT and GRACE KELLY

The Awful Truth began what The Atlantic later called “the most spectacular run ever for an actor in American pictures”.   During the next four years, Grant appeared in several classic romantic comedies and screwball comedies, including Holiday (1938) and Bringing Up Baby (1938), both opposite Katharine HepburnThe Philadelphia Story (1940) with Hepburn and James StewartHis Girl Friday (1940) with Rosalind Russell; and My Favorite Wife (1940), which reunited him with Irene Dunne, his co-star in The Awful Truth. During this time, he also made the adventure films Gunga Din (1939) with Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. and Only Angels Have Wings (1939) with Jean Arthur and Rita Hayworth and dramas Penny Serenade (1941), also with Dunne, and Suspicion (1941), the first of Grant’s four collaborations with Alfred Hitchcock.

Grant remained one of Hollywood’s top box-office attractions for almost 30 years.  Howard Hawks said that Grant was “so far the best that there isn’t anybody to be compared to him”.[15] David Thomson called him “the best and most important actor in the history of the cinema“.

Grant was a favorite of Hitchcock, who called him “the only actor I ever loved in my whole life”.  

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Besides Suspicion, Grant appeared in the Hitchcock classics Notorious (1946), To Catch a Thief(1955), and North by Northwest (1959). Biographer Patrick McGilligan wrote that in 1965 Hitchcock asked Grant to star in Torn Curtain (1966) only to learn that Grant had decided to retire after making one more film, Walk, Don’t Run (1966); 

Paul Newman was cast instead, oppositeJulie Andrews.   Producers Broccoli and Saltzman originally sought Cary Grant for the role of James Bond in Dr. No but discarded the idea as Grant would be committed to only one feature film and the producers decided to go after someone who could be part of a franchise.

In the mid-1950s, Grant formed his own production company, Granart Productions, and produced a number of films distributed by Universal, such as Operation Petticoat (1959), Indiscreet (1958),That Touch of Mink (co-starring with Doris Day, 1962), and Father Goose (1964). In 1963, he appeared opposite Audrey Hepburn in Charade. His last feature film was Walk, Don’t Run three years later, with Samantha Eggar and Jim Hutton.

Grant was the first actor to “go independent” by not renewing his studio contract, effectively leaving the studio system,  which almost completely controlled what an actor could or could not do. In this way, Grant was able to control every aspect of his career, at the risk of not working because no particular studio had an interest in his career long term.

He decided which films he was going to appear in, often had personal choice of directors and co-stars, and at times even negotiated a share of the gross revenue, something uncommon at the time. Grant received more than $700,000 for his 10% of the gross for To Catch a Thief while Hitchcock received less than $50,000 for directing and producing it.

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Grant was nominated for two Academy Awards, for Penny Serenade (1941) and None But the Lonely Heart (1944), but never won a competitive Oscar; he received a special Academy Award for Lifetime Achievement in 1970. Accepting the Best Original Screenplay Oscar in 1965, Father Goose co-writer Peter Stone had quipped, “My thanks to Cary Grant, who keeps winning these things for other people.” In 1981, Grant was accorded the Kennedy Center Honors.

Grant poked fun at himself with statements such as “Everyone wants to be Cary Grant—even I want to be Cary Grant”, and in ad-lib lines—such as in the film His Girl Friday, saying, “I never had so much fun since Archie Leach died”. In Arsenic and Old Lace (1944), a gravestone is seen bearing the name Archie Leach. According to a famous story now believed to be apocryphal, after seeing a telegram from a magazine editor to his agent asking “How old Cary Grant?” Grant reportedly responded with “Old Cary Grant fine. How you?

Cary Grant retired from the screen at 62 when his daughter Jennifer was born, in order to focus on bringing her up and to provide a sense of permanency and stability in her life.

While bringing up his daughter, he archived artifacts of her childhood and adolescence in a bank-quality room-sized vault he had installed in the house.

His daughter attributed this meticulous collection to the fact that artifacts of his own childhood had been destroyed during the Luftwaffe’s bombing of Bristol in the Second World War (an event that also claimed the lives of his uncle, aunt, and cousin as well as the cousin’s husband and grandson), and he may have wanted to prevent her from experiencing a similar loss.

Although Grant had retired from the screen, he remained active.

CARY GRANT - MARTIN LANDAU

CARY GRANT – MARTIN LANDAU

In the late 1960s, he accepted a position on the board of directors at Fabergé. By all accounts this position was not honorary, as some had assumed; Grant regularly attended meetings and his mere appearance at a product launch would almost certainly guarantee its success. The position also permitted use of a private plane, which Grant could use to fly to see his daughter wherever her mother, Dyan Cannon, was working.

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He later joined the boards of Hollywood Park, the Academy of Magical Arts (The Magic Castle, Hollywood, California), Western Airlines (now Delta Air Lines), andMGM.

He was a keen motoring enthusiast and, like many other Hollywood stars of the era, owned many notable cars. One of the first he owned was a 1929 Cadillac Cabriolet. His love of Cadillacs never waned and he later purchased a Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz. Other cars that he owned included an MG Magnette and a Sunbeam Alpine series one roadster.

In the last few years of his life, Grant undertook tours of the United States in a one-man show, A Conversation with Cary Grant, in which he would show clips from his films and answer audience questions. Grant was preparing for a performance at the Adler Theatre in DavenportIowa, on the afternoon of November 29, 1986, when he sustained a cerebral hemorrhage (he had previously suffered a stroke in October 1984). His wife did not know what was going on and she went to a local pharmacy to get aspirin. He died at 11:22 p.m.  in St. Luke’s Hospital at the age of 82.

The bulk of his estate, worth millions of dollars, went to his fifth wife, Barbara Harris, and his daughter, Jennifer Grant

In 2001, a statue of Grant was erected in Millennium Square, a regenerated area next to Bristol Harbour in his city of birth, Bristol.

In November 2005, Grant came in first in the “The 50 Greatest Movie Stars of All Time” list by Premiere magazine.  Richard Schickel, the film critic, said about Grant: “He’s the best star actor there ever was in the movies.

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CARY GRANT – ROGER MOORE

Filmography[edit]

Year Film Role Notes
1932 This Is the Night Stephen With Lili DamitaCharles Ruggles, and Thelma Todd
Sinners in the Sun Ridgeway With Carole Lombard and Chester Morris
Singapore Sue First Sailor Musical Comedy short subject
Merrily We Go to Hell Charlie Baxter UK title: Merrily We Go to _____With Sylvia Sidney and Fredric March
Devil and the Deep Lieutenant Jaeckel With Tallulah Bankhead and Gary Cooper
Blonde Venus Nick Townsend With Marlene Dietrich
Hot Saturday Romer Sheffield With Nancy Carroll and Edward Woods
Madame Butterfly Lieutenant B.F. Pinkerton With Sylvia Sidney and Charles Ruggles
1933 She Done Him Wrong Capt. Cummings With Mae West and Noah Beery, Sr.
The Woman Accused Jeffrey Baxter With Nancy Carroll
The Eagle and the Hawk Henry Crocker With Fredric March and Carole Lombard
Gambling Ship Ace Corbin With Jack La Rue and Glenda Farrell
I’m No Angel Jack Clayton With Mae West
Alice in Wonderland The Mock Turtle With W. C. Fields and Gary Cooper
1934 Thirty-Day Princess Porter Madison III With Sylvia Sidney and Edward Arnold
Born to Be Bad Malcolm Trevor With Loretta Young(Heavily censored by the Hayes Office)
Kiss and Make-Up Dr. Maurice Lamar With Helen Mack and the WAMPAS Baby Stars of 1934
Ladies Should Listen Julian De Lussac With Frances Drake and Edward Everett Horton
1935 Enter Madame Gerald Fitzgerald With top-billed Elissa Landi
Wings in the Dark Ken Gordon With top-billed Myrna Loy
The Last Outpost Michael Andrews With Claude Rains
Sylvia Scarlett Jimmy Monkley Directed by George CukorWith Katharine Hepburn
1936 Big Brown Eyes Det. Sgt. Danny Barr With Joan Bennett and Walter Pidgeon
Suzy Andre With Jean Harlow and Franchot Tone
The Amazing Quest of Ernest Bliss Ernest Bliss US title: Romance and RichesAlt title: The Amazing Adventure
Wedding Present Charlie With Joan Bennett
1937 When You’re in Love Jimmy Hudson UK title: For You AloneWith Grace Moore
Topper George Kerby With Constance Bennett
The Toast of New York Nicholas “Nick” Boyd With Edward Arnold and Jack Oakie
The Awful Truth Jerry Warriner Directed by Leo McCarey
With Irene Dunne and Ralph Bellamy
Introduced the “Cary Grant persona”
1938 Bringing up Baby Dr. David Huxley Directed by Howard Hawks
With Katharine Hepburn and Charles Ruggles
Holiday John “Johnny” Case Directed by George Cukor
With Katharine Hepburn
UK title: Free to Live
1939 Gunga Din Sgt. Archibald Cutter Directed by George Stevens
With Victor McLaglen and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.
Only Angels Have Wings Geoff Carter Directed by Howard Hawks
With Jean ArthurThomas Mitchell and Rita Hayworth
In Name Only Alec Walker With Carole Lombard and Charles Coburn
1940 His Girl Friday Walter Burns Directed by Howard Hawks
Remake of The Front Page
With Rosalind Russell and Ralph Bellamy
My Favorite Wife Nick Co-written by Leo McCarey
Directed by Garson Kanin
With Irene Dunne and Gail Patrick
The Howards of Virginia Matt Howard UK title: The Tree of Liberty
With Martha Scott
The Philadelphia Story C.K. Dexter Haven With Katharine Hepburn and James Stewart
1941 Penny Serenade Roger Adams Nominated—Academy Award for Best Actor
Directed by George Stevens
With Irene Dunne and Edgar Buchanan
Suspicion Johnnie Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
With Joan Fontaine
1942 The Talk of the Town Leopold Dilg aka Joseph With Ronald Colman and Jean Arthur
Once Upon a Honeymoon Patrick “Pat” O’Toole Directed by Leo McCarey
With Ginger Rogers
1943 Mr. Lucky Joe Adams/Joe Bascopolous With Laraine Day and Charles Bickford
Destination Tokyo Capt. Cassidy With John Garfield and Dane Clark
1944 Once Upon a Time Jerry Flynn With Janet Blair
Arsenic and Old Lace Mortimer Brewster With Priscilla Lane and Peter Lorre
None But the Lonely Heart Ernie Mott Nominated—Academy Award for Best ActorWritten and directed by Clifford Odets
With Ethel Barrymore
1946 Without Reservations Himself (cameo) With Claudette Colbert and John Wayne
Night and Day Cole Porter Directed by Michael Curtiz
Notorious T.R. Devlin Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
With Ingrid Bergman and Claude Rains
1947 The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer Dick UK title: Bachelor KnightWith Myrna Loy and Shirley Temple
The Bishop’s Wife Dudley With Loretta Young and David Niven
1948 Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House Jim Blandings With Myrna Loy and Melvyn Douglas
Every Girl Should Be Married Dr. Madison W. Brown With Betsy Drake
1949 I Was a Male War Bride Capt. Henri Rochard UK title: You Can’t Sleep Here
With Ann Sheridan
1950 Crisis Dr. Eugene Norland Ferguson With Jose Ferrer
1951 People Will Talk Dr. Noah Praetorius With Jeanne Crain
1952 Room for One More George “Poppy” Rose With Betsy Drake
Monkey Business Dr. Barnaby Fulton Directed by Howard Hawks
With Ginger Rogers and Marilyn Monroe
1953 Dream Wife Clemson Reade With Deborah Kerr and Walter Pidgeon
1955 To Catch a Thief John Robie Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
With Grace Kelly
1957 The Pride and the Passion Anthony With Frank Sinatra and Sophia Loren
An Affair to Remember Nickie Ferrante A same-script remake of Love Affair (1939 film), both directed by Leo McCareyWith Deborah Kerr
Kiss Them for Me Cmdr. Andy Crewson Directed by Stanley Donen
With Jayne Mansfield and Suzy Parker
1958 Indiscreet Philip Adams Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Directed by Stanley Donen
With Ingrid Bergman
Houseboat Tom Winters With Sophia Loren
1959 North by Northwest Roger O. Thornhill Directed by Alfred HitchcockWith Eva Marie SaintJames Mason and Martin Landau
Famous scene of Grant being chased by a biplane
Operation Petticoat Lt. Cmdr. Matt T. Sherman Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
With Dina Merrill and Arthur O’Connell
1960 The Grass Is Greener Victor Rhyall, Earl Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or ComedyDirected by Stanley Donen
With Deborah KerrRobert Mitchum and Jean Simmons
1962 That Touch of Mink Philip Shayne Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Directed by Delbert Mann
With Doris Day and Gig Young
1963 Charade Peter Joshua / Alexander Dyle / Adam Canfield / Brian Cruikshank Nominated—BAFTA Award for Best Foreign Actor
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Directed by Stanley Donen
With Audrey HepburnWalter Matthau and James Coburn
1964 Father Goose Walter Christopher Eckland Directed by Ralph Nelson
With Leslie Caron and Trevor Howard
1966 Walk, Don’t Run Sir William Rutland With Samantha EggarRemake of The More the Merrier

 CARY GRANT : Here also another article

A lire aussi ( A french article)

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ERIC CLAPTON

Single Or Married

ANNIVERSARIES : 18th of January


Anniversaires de naissances et décès en ce 18 Janvier
Birthdays and death anniversaries on 18th January

 

 

NAISSANCES      BIRTHDAYS   

18 janvier 1980 ◊ Estelle, chanteuse, rappeuse et productrice britannique (36 ans).
◊ Jason Segel, acteur, scénariste et musicien américain (36 ans).
18 janvier 1965 ◊ Valérie Damidot, animatrice télé française (51 ans).
18 janvier 1956 ◊ Elli Medeiros, chanteuse uruguayenne, carrière en France (60 ans).
18 janvier 1955 ◊ Kevin Costner, acteur et réalisateur américain (61 ans).
18 janvier 1950 ◊ Gilles Villeneuve, coureur automobile québecois (aurait 66 ans).
† 8 mai 1982
18 janvier 1949 ◊ Franz-Olivier Giesbert, journaliste français (67 ans).
◊ Philippe Starck, Designer et architecte français (67 ans).
18 janvier 1933 ◊ Jean Vuarnet, skieur français (83 ans).
18 janvier 1913 ◊ Danny Kaye, acteur américain (aurait 103 ans).
† 3 mars 1987
18 janvier 1904 ◊ Cary Grant, acteur américain (aurait 112 ans).
† 29 novembre 1986
18 janvier 1892 ◊ Oliver Hardy, acteur américain, Laurel & Hardy (aurait 124 ans).
† 7 août 1957
18 janvier 1881 ◊ Gaston Gallimard, éditeur français (aurait 135 ans).
† 25 décembre 1975
18 janvier 1689 ◊ Montesquieu, écrivain philosophe français (aurait 327 ans).
† 10 février 1755

 

 

danny kaye

Danny Kaye

 

CARY GRANT : here also another article / Voici un autre article

OLIVER HARDY : here also another article / Voici un autre article

 

Décès   Death   18 Janvier 

18 janvier 1988
Il y a 28 ans
† Jean Mitry, co-fondateur de la cinémathèque française (à 81 ans).
né le 7 novembre 1907
18 janvier 1986
Il y a 30 ans
† Jean Cassou, écrivain et résistant français (à 88 ans).
né le 9 juillet 1897
18 janvier 1977
Il y a 60 ans
† Yvonne Printemps, actrice française (à 82 ans).
née le 25 juillet 1894
18 janvier 1936
Il y a 80 ans
† Rudyard Kipling, écrivain britannique (à 71 ans).
né le 30 décembre 1865

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CARY GRANT : On PARAMOUNT CHANNEL


PARAMOUNT CHANNEL : CARY GRANT

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Wikipedia sources: 

Cary Grant (born Archibald Alexander Leach; January 18, 1904 – November 29, 1986) was an English stage and Hollywood film actor who became an American citizen in 1942. Known for his transatlantic accent, debonair demeanor and “dashing good looks”, Grant is considered one of classic Hollywood‘s definitive leading men.

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Notorious (1946), The Bishop’s Wife (1947), To Catch a Thief (1955), An Affair to Remember (1957), North by Northwest (1959), and Charade (1963).

Nominated twice for the Academy Award for Best Actor (Penny Serenade and None But the Lonely Heart) and five times for a Golden Globe Award for Best Actor, Grant was continually passed over. In 1970, he was presented an Honorary Oscar at the 42nd Academy Awards by Frank Sinatra “for his unique mastery of the art of screen acting with the respect and affection of his colleagues

Early life and career

Archibald Alexander Leach was born at 15 Hughenden Road, HorfieldBristolEngland, to Elsie Maria (née Kingdon) Leach (1877–1973) and Elias James Leach (1873–1935). An only child, Leach had an unhappy upbringing, attending Bishop Road Primary School.

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CARY GRANT WITH AUDREY HEPBURN

His mother had suffered from clinical depression since the death of a previous child. Her husband placed her in a mental institution and told his 9-year-old son only that she had gone away on a “long holiday”. Believing she was dead, Leach did not learn otherwise until he was 31 and discovered her alive in a care facility.  When Leach was 10, his father abandoned him after remarrying and having a baby with his new young wife. 

Leach was expelled from the Fairfield Grammar School in Bristol in 1918. After joining the “Bob Pender Stage Troupe”, Leach performed as a stilt walker and traveled with the group to the United States in 1920 at the age of 16 on the RMS Olympic, on a two-year tour of the country. He was processed at Ellis Island on July 28, 1920.

When the troupe returned to the UK, he decided to stay in the U.S. and continue his stage career. During this time, he became a part of thevaudeville world and toured with Parker, Rand, and Leach.

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Still using his birth name, he performed on the stage at The Muny in St. Louis,Missouri, in such shows as Irene (1931), Music in May (1931), Nina Rosa (1931), Rio Rita (1931), Street Singer (1931), The Three Musketeers (1931), and Wonderful Night (1931). Leach’s experience on stage as a stilt walker, acrobat, juggler, and mime taught him “phenomenal physical grace and exquisite comic timing” and the value of teamwork, skills which would benefit him in Hollywood.

Leach became a naturalized United States citizen on June 26, 1942, at which time he also legally changed his name from “Archibald Alexander Leach” to “Cary Grant”.

After appearing in several musicals on Broadway under the name Archie Leach, Leach went to Hollywood in 1931.  When told to change his name, he proposed “Cary Lockwood”, the name of the character he had played in the Broadway show Nikki, based upon the recent film The Last Flight.

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He signed with Paramount Pictures, where studio bosses decided that the name “Cary” was acceptable but that “Lockwood” was too similar to another actor’s surname. Paramount gave their new actor a list of surnames to choose from, and he selected “Grant” because the initials C and G had already proved lucky for Clark Gable and Gary Cooper, two of Hollywood’s biggest film stars.

Grant appeared as a leading man opposite Marlene Dietrich in Blonde Venus (1932), and his stardom was given a further boost by Mae Westwhen she chose him for her leading man in two of her most successful films, She Done Him Wrong and I’m No Angel (both 1933).  

I’m No Angel was a tremendous financial success and, along with She Done Him Wrong, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Picture, saved Paramount from bankruptcy. Paramount put Grant in a series of unsuccessful films until 1936, when he signed with Columbia Pictures. His first major comedy hit was when he was loaned to Hal Roach‘s studio for the 1937 Topper (which was distributed by MGM).

The Awful Truth (1937) was a pivotal film in Grant’s career, establishing for him a screen persona as a sophisticated light comedy leading man. As Grant later wrote, “I pretended to be somebody I wanted to be and I finally became that person. Or he became me. Or we met at some point.”  Grant is said to have based his characterization in The Awful Truth on the mannerisms and intonations of the film’s director, Leo McCarey, whom he resembled physically. As writer/director Peter Bogdanovich noted, “After The Awful Truth, when it came to light comedy, there was Cary Grant and then everyone else was an also-ran.”

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CARY GRANT and GRACE KELLY

The Awful Truth began what The Atlantic later called “the most spectacular run ever for an actor in American pictures”.   During the next four years, Grant appeared in several classic romantic comedies and screwball comedies, including Holiday (1938) and Bringing Up Baby (1938), both opposite Katharine HepburnThe Philadelphia Story (1940) with Hepburn and James StewartHis Girl Friday (1940) with Rosalind Russell; and My Favorite Wife (1940), which reunited him with Irene Dunne, his co-star in The Awful Truth. During this time, he also made the adventure films Gunga Din (1939) with Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. and Only Angels Have Wings (1939) with Jean Arthur and Rita Hayworth and dramas Penny Serenade (1941), also with Dunne, and Suspicion (1941), the first of Grant’s four collaborations with Alfred Hitchcock.

Grant remained one of Hollywood’s top box-office attractions for almost 30 years.  Howard Hawks said that Grant was “so far the best that there isn’t anybody to be compared to him”.[15] David Thomson called him “the best and most important actor in the history of the cinema“.

Grant was a favorite of Hitchcock, who called him “the only actor I ever loved in my whole life”.  

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Besides Suspicion, Grant appeared in the Hitchcock classics Notorious (1946), To Catch a Thief(1955), and North by Northwest (1959). Biographer Patrick McGilligan wrote that in 1965 Hitchcock asked Grant to star in Torn Curtain (1966) only to learn that Grant had decided to retire after making one more film, Walk, Don’t Run (1966); 

Paul Newman was cast instead, oppositeJulie Andrews.   Producers Broccoli and Saltzman originally sought Cary Grant for the role of James Bond in Dr. No but discarded the idea as Grant would be committed to only one feature film and the producers decided to go after someone who could be part of a franchise.

In the mid-1950s, Grant formed his own production company, Granart Productions, and produced a number of films distributed by Universal, such as Operation Petticoat (1959), Indiscreet (1958),That Touch of Mink (co-starring with Doris Day, 1962), and Father Goose (1964). In 1963, he appeared opposite Audrey Hepburn in Charade. His last feature film was Walk, Don’t Run three years later, with Samantha Eggar and Jim Hutton.

Grant was the first actor to “go independent” by not renewing his studio contract, effectively leaving the studio system,  which almost completely controlled what an actor could or could not do. In this way, Grant was able to control every aspect of his career, at the risk of not working because no particular studio had an interest in his career long term.

He decided which films he was going to appear in, often had personal choice of directors and co-stars, and at times even negotiated a share of the gross revenue, something uncommon at the time. Grant received more than $700,000 for his 10% of the gross for To Catch a Thief while Hitchcock received less than $50,000 for directing and producing it.

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Grant was nominated for two Academy Awards, for Penny Serenade (1941) and None But the Lonely Heart (1944), but never won a competitive Oscar; he received a special Academy Award for Lifetime Achievement in 1970. Accepting the Best Original Screenplay Oscar in 1965, Father Goose co-writer Peter Stone had quipped, “My thanks to Cary Grant, who keeps winning these things for other people.” In 1981, Grant was accorded the Kennedy Center Honors.

Grant poked fun at himself with statements such as “Everyone wants to be Cary Grant—even I want to be Cary Grant”, and in ad-lib lines—such as in the film His Girl Friday, saying, “I never had so much fun since Archie Leach died”. In Arsenic and Old Lace (1944), a gravestone is seen bearing the name Archie Leach. According to a famous story now believed to be apocryphal, after seeing a telegram from a magazine editor to his agent asking “How old Cary Grant?” Grant reportedly responded with “Old Cary Grant fine. How you?

Cary Grant retired from the screen at 62 when his daughter Jennifer was born, in order to focus on bringing her up and to provide a sense of permanency and stability in her life.

While bringing up his daughter, he archived artifacts of her childhood and adolescence in a bank-quality room-sized vault he had installed in the house.

His daughter attributed this meticulous collection to the fact that artifacts of his own childhood had been destroyed during the Luftwaffe’s bombing of Bristol in the Second World War (an event that also claimed the lives of his uncle, aunt, and cousin as well as the cousin’s husband and grandson), and he may have wanted to prevent her from experiencing a similar loss.

Although Grant had retired from the screen, he remained active.

CARY GRANT - MARTIN LANDAU

CARY GRANT – MARTIN LANDAU

In the late 1960s, he accepted a position on the board of directors at Fabergé. By all accounts this position was not honorary, as some had assumed; Grant regularly attended meetings and his mere appearance at a product launch would almost certainly guarantee its success. The position also permitted use of a private plane, which Grant could use to fly to see his daughter wherever her mother, Dyan Cannon, was working.

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He later joined the boards of Hollywood Park, the Academy of Magical Arts (The Magic Castle, Hollywood, California), Western Airlines (now Delta Air Lines), andMGM.

He was a keen motoring enthusiast and, like many other Hollywood stars of the era, owned many notable cars. One of the first he owned was a 1929 Cadillac Cabriolet. His love of Cadillacs never waned and he later purchased a Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz. Other cars that he owned included an MG Magnette and a Sunbeam Alpine series one roadster.

In the last few years of his life, Grant undertook tours of the United States in a one-man show, A Conversation with Cary Grant, in which he would show clips from his films and answer audience questions. Grant was preparing for a performance at the Adler Theatre in DavenportIowa, on the afternoon of November 29, 1986, when he sustained a cerebral hemorrhage (he had previously suffered a stroke in October 1984). His wife did not know what was going on and she went to a local pharmacy to get aspirin. He died at 11:22 p.m.  in St. Luke’s Hospital at the age of 82.

The bulk of his estate, worth millions of dollars, went to his fifth wife, Barbara Harris, and his daughter, Jennifer Grant

In 2001, a statue of Grant was erected in Millennium Square, a regenerated area next to Bristol Harbour in his city of birth, Bristol.

In November 2005, Grant came in first in the “The 50 Greatest Movie Stars of All Time” list by Premiere magazine.  Richard Schickel, the film critic, said about Grant: “He’s the best star actor there ever was in the movies.

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CARY GRANT – ROGER MOORE

Filmography[edit]

Year Film Role Notes
1932 This Is the Night Stephen With Lili DamitaCharles Ruggles, and Thelma Todd
Sinners in the Sun Ridgeway With Carole Lombard and Chester Morris
Singapore Sue First Sailor Musical Comedy short subject
Merrily We Go to Hell Charlie Baxter UK title: Merrily We Go to _____With Sylvia Sidney and Fredric March
Devil and the Deep Lieutenant Jaeckel With Tallulah Bankhead and Gary Cooper
Blonde Venus Nick Townsend With Marlene Dietrich
Hot Saturday Romer Sheffield With Nancy Carroll and Edward Woods
Madame Butterfly Lieutenant B.F. Pinkerton With Sylvia Sidney and Charles Ruggles
1933 She Done Him Wrong Capt. Cummings With Mae West and Noah Beery, Sr.
The Woman Accused Jeffrey Baxter With Nancy Carroll
The Eagle and the Hawk Henry Crocker With Fredric March and Carole Lombard
Gambling Ship Ace Corbin With Jack La Rue and Glenda Farrell
I’m No Angel Jack Clayton With Mae West
Alice in Wonderland The Mock Turtle With W. C. Fields and Gary Cooper
1934 Thirty-Day Princess Porter Madison III With Sylvia Sidney and Edward Arnold
Born to Be Bad Malcolm Trevor With Loretta Young(Heavily censored by the Hayes Office)
Kiss and Make-Up Dr. Maurice Lamar With Helen Mack and the WAMPAS Baby Stars of 1934
Ladies Should Listen Julian De Lussac With Frances Drake and Edward Everett Horton
1935 Enter Madame Gerald Fitzgerald With top-billed Elissa Landi
Wings in the Dark Ken Gordon With top-billed Myrna Loy
The Last Outpost Michael Andrews With Claude Rains
Sylvia Scarlett Jimmy Monkley Directed by George CukorWith Katharine Hepburn
1936 Big Brown Eyes Det. Sgt. Danny Barr With Joan Bennett and Walter Pidgeon
Suzy Andre With Jean Harlow and Franchot Tone
The Amazing Quest of Ernest Bliss Ernest Bliss US title: Romance and RichesAlt title: The Amazing Adventure
Wedding Present Charlie With Joan Bennett
1937 When You’re in Love Jimmy Hudson UK title: For You AloneWith Grace Moore
Topper George Kerby With Constance Bennett
The Toast of New York Nicholas “Nick” Boyd With Edward Arnold and Jack Oakie
The Awful Truth Jerry Warriner Directed by Leo McCarey
With Irene Dunne and Ralph Bellamy
Introduced the “Cary Grant persona”
1938 Bringing up Baby Dr. David Huxley Directed by Howard Hawks
With Katharine Hepburn and Charles Ruggles
Holiday John “Johnny” Case Directed by George Cukor
With Katharine Hepburn
UK title: Free to Live
1939 Gunga Din Sgt. Archibald Cutter Directed by George Stevens
With Victor McLaglen and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.
Only Angels Have Wings Geoff Carter Directed by Howard Hawks
With Jean ArthurThomas Mitchell and Rita Hayworth
In Name Only Alec Walker With Carole Lombard and Charles Coburn
1940 His Girl Friday Walter Burns Directed by Howard Hawks
Remake of The Front Page
With Rosalind Russell and Ralph Bellamy
My Favorite Wife Nick Co-written by Leo McCarey
Directed by Garson Kanin
With Irene Dunne and Gail Patrick
The Howards of Virginia Matt Howard UK title: The Tree of Liberty
With Martha Scott
The Philadelphia Story C.K. Dexter Haven With Katharine Hepburn and James Stewart
1941 Penny Serenade Roger Adams Nominated—Academy Award for Best Actor
Directed by George Stevens
With Irene Dunne and Edgar Buchanan
Suspicion Johnnie Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
With Joan Fontaine
1942 The Talk of the Town Leopold Dilg aka Joseph With Ronald Colman and Jean Arthur
Once Upon a Honeymoon Patrick “Pat” O’Toole Directed by Leo McCarey
With Ginger Rogers
1943 Mr. Lucky Joe Adams/Joe Bascopolous With Laraine Day and Charles Bickford
Destination Tokyo Capt. Cassidy With John Garfield and Dane Clark
1944 Once Upon a Time Jerry Flynn With Janet Blair
Arsenic and Old Lace Mortimer Brewster With Priscilla Lane and Peter Lorre
None But the Lonely Heart Ernie Mott Nominated—Academy Award for Best ActorWritten and directed by Clifford Odets
With Ethel Barrymore
1946 Without Reservations Himself (cameo) With Claudette Colbert and John Wayne
Night and Day Cole Porter Directed by Michael Curtiz
Notorious T.R. Devlin Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
With Ingrid Bergman and Claude Rains
1947 The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer Dick UK title: Bachelor KnightWith Myrna Loy and Shirley Temple
The Bishop’s Wife Dudley With Loretta Young and David Niven
1948 Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House Jim Blandings With Myrna Loy and Melvyn Douglas
Every Girl Should Be Married Dr. Madison W. Brown With Betsy Drake
1949 I Was a Male War Bride Capt. Henri Rochard UK title: You Can’t Sleep Here
With Ann Sheridan
1950 Crisis Dr. Eugene Norland Ferguson With Jose Ferrer
1951 People Will Talk Dr. Noah Praetorius With Jeanne Crain
1952 Room for One More George “Poppy” Rose With Betsy Drake
Monkey Business Dr. Barnaby Fulton Directed by Howard Hawks
With Ginger Rogers and Marilyn Monroe
1953 Dream Wife Clemson Reade With Deborah Kerr and Walter Pidgeon
1955 To Catch a Thief John Robie Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
With Grace Kelly
1957 The Pride and the Passion Anthony With Frank Sinatra and Sophia Loren
An Affair to Remember Nickie Ferrante A same-script remake of Love Affair (1939 film), both directed by Leo McCareyWith Deborah Kerr
Kiss Them for Me Cmdr. Andy Crewson Directed by Stanley Donen
With Jayne Mansfield and Suzy Parker
1958 Indiscreet Philip Adams Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Directed by Stanley Donen
With Ingrid Bergman
Houseboat Tom Winters With Sophia Loren
1959 North by Northwest Roger O. Thornhill Directed by Alfred HitchcockWith Eva Marie SaintJames Mason and Martin Landau
Famous scene of Grant being chased by a biplane
Operation Petticoat Lt. Cmdr. Matt T. Sherman Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
With Dina Merrill and Arthur O’Connell
1960 The Grass Is Greener Victor Rhyall, Earl Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or ComedyDirected by Stanley Donen
With Deborah KerrRobert Mitchum and Jean Simmons
1962 That Touch of Mink Philip Shayne Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Directed by Delbert Mann
With Doris Day and Gig Young
1963 Charade Peter Joshua / Alexander Dyle / Adam Canfield / Brian Cruikshank Nominated—BAFTA Award for Best Foreign Actor
Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Directed by Stanley Donen
With Audrey HepburnWalter Matthau and James Coburn
1964 Father Goose Walter Christopher Eckland Directed by Ralph Nelson
With Leslie Caron and Trevor Howard
1966 Walk, Don’t Run Sir William Rutland With Samantha EggarRemake of The More the Merrier

 CARY GRANT : Here also another article

A lire aussi ( A french article)

http://www.radiosatellite2.com/archives/2014/07/06/30199855.html

 

GOOGLE SEARCH OF FUTURE

ERIC CLAPTON

Single Or Married